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Discussion Starter #1
I drove a hire car for work today and got given a Ford Fiesta with their new 1 litre, 3 cylinder engine. The 'rorty' noise and lack of punch for overtaking at high speed reminded me of our first generation Insight engine that won International Engine of the Year in its class for seven years in a row.

It occurred to me that Ford has a new 1 litre, 3 cylinder engine for its Fiesta, Focus and B-Max. As does Peugeot in their 208 model and VW with their Up! etc etc

See:
Ford Fiesta 1 0t 100 Ecoboost Zetec S S 5dr Review | What Car?
Full review of Peugeot 208 Hatchback What Car?
Full review of Volkswagen Up Hatchback What Car?

Of course all these car manufacturers are now trying to produce economical cars and reduce their average fleet CO2 emissions to meet regulations. However it occurs to me that the patents may now have expired on the Insight engine design? It is just the number of 1 litre, 3 cylinder engines that are suddenly available...any patent lawyers or car industry experts able to back up my hunch?

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Maybe they have been following the history of the LITTLE RED ROCKET.

The Ford engine has a lot of the same things the G1 has. Ultra low friction, offset cylinders, etc. I think I read somewhere that it has Direct Injection.

Unfortunately I don't think it will ever appear in the USA, due to the Govt. crash test standards.

I said some years back that eventually we would see smaller engines produced.....with turbos.

Willie
 

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Unfortunately I don't think it will ever appear in the USA, due to the Govt. crash test standards.

I said some years back that eventually we would see smaller engines produced.....with turbos.

Willie
Isn't the new fiesta already sold here? Why would the 3 cylinder do differently in the crash tests?
 

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Yes it is as I can attest to one sitting in my garage. Right now the 3 cylinder 1 liter turbo charged engines are not sold in the US but I'm guessing we'll see them in another year or two.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ford are using the engine across a few models - I thought you guys get the Focus across the pond? They sell the 1 litre version in Europe.
 

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the first thing I thought was how long it takes to develop an engine.
then how long to create the production line.
5 or so years does not seem unreasonable.

I am not sure what was the first 3 cylinder gasoline
but Good Ideas are often copied quickly.

victor
 

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Ford engines by Yamaha?

I believe Yamaha have been doing the design and development work for Ford for the last twenty years, taking over the reins after Ford Engineers lost the plot with the Sachs 2 stroke and the lean-burn engines which all failed Nox standards.

As you can guess I am not a fan of Ford products, although I acknowledge their major strides in improvement since the 1990s.

3000 components all from the lowest price bidder, describes the typical Ford in my ownership experience.
 

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Three cylinders

I do not think you can patent "three cylinders".

The benefit of three cylinders is a reduction in engine friction and fewer parts but with the disadvantage of greater vibration and torque fluctuation than a four.

Honda have an ace up the sleeve in the IMA system. The IMA motor serves as a clever electrical balancer system, the IMA motor generator loads and unloads in synchronisation with compression and ignition strokes of the Insight engine, reducing vibration and harshness. That is very patentable being one of the many Honda lodged for the car, I think any competitors would have a hard time getting around the Honda patent if they tried a similar idea
 

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Smug, me?

Hi all.

I posted this on 21st feb 2012:

"I was struck by an odd sense of deja-vu recently when reading about developments in engine design at Peugeot and Ford. Peugeot describe this as 'a gamechanger' and Ford as "the freshest powertrain lineup in the industry". These engines will be produced in large volumes, powering the Peugeot 208 and Ford Ka, Fiesta, Focus, C-Max etc.

Both claim that they are introducing many new technologies. So what makes these new engines so innovative?

The Ford 1.0 litre Ecoboost features:
- three cylinders 999cc
- direct injection
- offset crankshaft to reduce friction
- exhaust manifold integrated in the cylinder head
- no balancer shaft
- variable valve timing
- low friction coatings to reduce loses
- less than 120g/km CO2

The Peugeot engine family will include:
- three cylinders 1.0 and 1.2l
- exhaust manifold integrated in the cylinder head
- variable valve timing system
- 'innovative' micro-hybrid Stop & Start System
- 99g/km and 104g/km CO2

So how can smaller, less powerful (but more efficient) engines provide adequate performance in mass market cars, even when turbocharged?

Ford say that the next stage is downsizing of the cars themselves to reduce weight, and less drag. There is a tantalizing mention of adding mild hybrid systems recovering energy when the car decelerates too.

Peugeot's new 208 is claimed to be shorter and lower than the 207 it replaces, weighing "a commendable" 110kg less. Cd of 0.29, CdA of 0.61 are also claimed.

Have we just seen the corner being turned here? Given the massive investment needed in new engine production, there must be real commitment to a future that looks just a little like the one Honda's engineers saw at the turn of the last century..."
 

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EU6 emissions are a pain to implement in smaller cars with the packaging constraints and cost increase of a urea aftertreatment, dosing module, fill point and additional servicing costs.

So now its time for the petrol to play catchup with downsizing, turbocharging and often direct injection.Still quite a cost jump from a 1.6 NA to the 1.0 EcoBoost Ford Focus but even then the lighter mass is noted by drivers and that drives weight refinement on things like brakes and suspension items.

Alot of OEM are also jumping into the market the 107/c1 and Aygo occupied with the 1.0 engine but offering more of a premium car as consumers are starting to desire smaller cars. VW Up, Vauxhall Adam, etc.
 

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Such as "tightening up the nut on the steering wheel."

Sorry, I couldn't resist.

Willie
 

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I suspect that to pull good numbers on the motorway, you would need to stay off boost and basically drive with load (or just drive slower).

Most British drivers will just be keeping their foot down, using the turbo to maintain 70+ mph on the motorway.

Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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Exactly, Willie. Smaller engines with turbos make their economy at light load where they are out of the boost and the ECU maxes out the spark timing. During acceleration they are making virtually the same mileage as a bigger engine gulping the same amount of air and fuel. The problem is at throttle tip in. Even DI turbos have lag compared to an NA or supercharged engine, so many drivers gas it harder to offset. In order to get better mileage, one has to maximize the advantage and minimize the disadvantage. Most drivers don't pay any attention to either. In theory, they could hopefully see a weight advantage from the smaller engine, but large displacement engines like the latest small block Chevys can be both small and lightweight relative to their output. I guarantee you it weighs less and takes up less space than anything else in its power range. Unless you tighten the nut behind the wheel as Willie says, the only tech gains to be had are in the fuel injection system and/or hybrids.
 
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