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Discussion Starter #1
I am just finishing up a grid charge after my second discharge cycle with a Prolong smart discharger. The model I have has 96v, 60v, and 12v options.

My first discharge was to 96v, second was to 60v. My goal with all of this is to hopefully recover some usable capacity and cut down on time needed between grid charges/maintenance of the battery. I'm under no illusions I'll experience any miracles - incremental improvement is all I'm after.

I have read tons of opinions on termination voltages and discharge regiments, but many of those threads are 5-10 years old at this point, and I know that thinking on these things continues to evolve. Looking for a quick read some current opinions.

Should I:

-Proceed on to the 12v discharge / grid charge cycle?
-Do another discharge to 60v?
-Finish up this charge and just go drive and not worry about a third discharge?

I don't have much information to share about the battery - so really just looking for general opinions from folks that have messed around with a lot of batteries. It's presumed to be either the original battery or a warranty replacement. The sticks look original peering through the fan. There was no evidence of a charger or discharger ever having been installed in the car before I bought it. I haven't gotten into measuring tap voltages or any of that, it's all a little over my head and more than I care to take on.
 

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I typically do one charge-discharge-charge cycle to below 15 volts. I may try two discharge cycles next time as my Honda warranty replacement battery is now 7 years old.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, I finished up the grid charge and have decided to give the 12v discharge a go. I know there's a small risk of damaging the weaker cells, but the risk/reward equation seems good enough to place a bet on. I will report back on results in a couple days!
 

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I would not discharge that low with the light bulb set up..stay with a good charge and see where your at. Than go to a slow discharge method. Post 1449 read up and get more opinions.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I would not discharge that low with the light bulb set up..stay with a good charge and see where your at. Than go to a slow discharge method. Post 1449 read up and get more opinions.
I’m not using a lightbulb, I’m using the prolong smart discharger. And I have searched and read extensively... was just looking for a few current thoughts, as a lot of the more in depth threads on discharging are from the mid 2010s and I wasn't sure if the consensus thinking had evolved since then.

In any event, the deed is done and the car is on the final long grid charge of the cycle now. Should be ready to drive tomorrow.
 

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Is the discharger with a light bulb, did you swap out to a lower watt bulb. If so what was the the last lowest volt you took it down to.
 

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This addresses OP's original question

I don't know what the 'smart' discharger does - does it do something special, like have slope detection?

I'll assume it doesn't and I'll add my 2 cents in the interest of informing potential future readers. What I would have suggested to help determine whether to go for the deeper 12V discharge is this: Use the pack in the car, let it charge to 'full' ('pos-recal') and then drain it to 'empty' ('neg recal'). Did your BAT gauge bars ever drop from an intermediate position to 1-3 bars while you were draining? Or did you get 'all the bars' of assist/discharge and then got your neg recal?

If it's the former, then I'd suggest NOT doing the 12V full pack deep discharge. The premature neg recal (empty) indicates that the monitored pairs of battery sticks are still very imbalanced, so if you were to do a full pack very deep discharge, it's almost certain that some cells in those early-empty sticks are going to be reversed for a relatively long period at relatively high discharge current. Cells have been known to fail from this - and that means the pack would really be done.

In such a case I'd recommend tap discharges, you can drain each stick-pair separately, without pulling the pack. You just have to short some terminals on the voltage tap connector.

If you're able to get 'full bars' of assist/discharge when you drain from full to empty, then I'm thinking the stick-pairs are probably balanced enough that a very low current full pack discharge would be OK, or at least relatively low/er risk.
 
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