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Some spy shot are coming out of the new Prius with an interesting gas door that looks big enough to have plug-in potential. The 2010 Prius is not due out until Jan 09 at NAIAS, so these shots may be the 2009 facelifted Prius. The much larger front end makes me wonder if they bumped the 1.5 to a turbo 1.8L like earlier reports claimed. While in camo this looks like a mildly facelifted Prius, but if you look closely at the details there are some extensive differences throughout the entire car... Not going to replace my Insight anytime soon though...


http://www.autounleashed.com/images/toy ... elift8.jpg
 

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The current front end looks better than this one,this is less distinctive.
I also noticed the large fuel flap seems to be partially covering the original one which can just be seen slightly on the left side. Does not look like a factory mod but a tack on one by someone that has modded into a PHEV and probably where the plug goes. Maybe they had a go at the front as well to customise it.

I think the new Prius will be noticeably different from the current one,this car is not.


DGate
 

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Plug in? What is the benefit of the plug in? Isn't the distance on electric only very short? How much power would be sucked into the battery to go that short distance?
 

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I have been charging my Insight nightly to roughly 8 - 10 Ah's. For the first 10 - 12 miles I can get 85 - 135 mpg, consider this is stop and go driving where I would be lucky to get 55ish mpg before. An 8 - 10Ah charge equates to about 1700 - 2000 Watt hours, or a 12 - 15 cent electric bill nightly. Consider gas costs about 7 cents a mile for 55mpg @ $3.80 / gallon.
 

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Plug in allows you to store more energy in hopefully a larger battery. Early reports indicate Toyota is shooting for up to 8 miles of electric only and up to 62 mph.
 

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That 8 miles is tops... or could you ween more out of it?
uhtrinity said:
I have been charging my Insight nightly to roughly 8 - 10 Ah's. For the first 10 - 12 miles I can get 85 - 135 mpg, consider this is stop and go driving where I would be lucky to get 55ish mpg before. An 8 - 10Ah charge equates to about 1700 - 2000 Watt hours, or a 12 - 15 cent electric bill nightly. Consider gas costs about 7 cents a mile for 55mpg @ $3.80 / gallon.
So at 8 miles (the max distance), we'd be seeing roughly 7 cents * 8 miles = 56 cents. Cost is 12 to 15 cents a night... or saving about 41 cents a day. Saving $2.05 a week... or just less than $110 a year. Granted, this would be sweet enough because I have to go uphill about 20% of my commute to work... so doing all electric there would help the mileage a lot.

It'd be nice if they could get 15 miles out of the battery though. 8 miles, it's something, but even where I'm located, in the middle of a bunch of stuff, 15 would get me everywhere. Possibly even back on electric alone. Battery regen work on electric only? I live in a valley and have hills that are good chargers. What'd also be good if the car could go all electric on large downhills.
 

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I run two batteries and charge to roughly 10 Ah, so my heavy assisted range is closer to 12 miles. Luckily my daily commute is under 10 miles, so it works out. This is with my Insight that does not do pure EV like the Prius can.
 

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Dgate said:
The current front end looks better than this one,this is less distinctive.
Yes it's "distinctive" but in a "my girlfriend got run over by an ugly tree" sort of distinctiveness. The large, slanted headlights are extremely ugly in my opinion. I no more like the looks of the Prius II, then I would want to date Ugly Betty.

As for the MPG:

I fully expect, using the U.S. test cycle, the overall MPG will go *down* especially on the interstate (where I spend 99.9% of my time). I think moving too larger engines is a huge mistake. Instead Toyota should be aiming to deliver 70-80 mpg using smaller engines. (Ditto other manufacturers.)
 

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Electric TRoy wrote....Yes it's "distinctive" but in a "my girlfriend got run over by an ugly tree" sort of distinctiveness. The large, slanted headlights are extremely ugly in my opinion. I no more like the looks of the Prius II, then I would want to date Ugly Betty.

Car design/looks has no relation to female's of the human species.....Just because the Prius is different to what you have been conditioned to expect a car to look like is no justification for this kind of remark.
The Prius is attempting to become a one box structure with a slope beginning at the front right up to the top of the windshield and on over to the tail.
Aerodynamic demands have probably dictated a lot of the detailing which you will see more of so get used to it.
Its one of the truely new,distinctive and futuristic looks on the road and will be copied.

DGate
 

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Dgate said:
Car design/looks has no relation to the human female species......
DGate
Though it may not seem so at times, female and male humans are members of one and the same species!! More accurate to phrase it "female of the human species".
 

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Dgate said:
Electric TRoy wrote.... I no more like the looks of the Prius II, then I would want to date Ugly Betty. Car design/looks has no relation to female's of the human species.....Just because the Prius is different to what you have been conditioned to expect a car to look like is no justification for this kind of remark.
My "don't like how it looks" opinion is just as valid as your "it looks good" opinion. I simply don't like the headlights. I think they are ugly.

The Prius is attempting to become a one box structure with a slope beginning at the front right up to the top of the windshield and on over to the tail.
They still could have given it round headlights. Or oval headlights. Neither of those would have affected the aerodynamics.
 

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Yes Troy your remark is a negative and mine is a positive so guess we cancel each other out.

Cars designed for markets other than the USA have for decades used the headlamp as part of the frontal styling even when we required by law round or rectangular lamps. The current Nissan Micra (not avail in US ) has the lamp unit almost up to the windshield.
I have often thought the windshield base should extend down far enough to enclose the headlamps on one box designs putting them behind the windshield glass.
The wipers could even perform a dual purpose keeping them clean without additional units...it would remove the lamps from frontal damage...shorten the wiring harness and take them out of a hostile weather environment. Fiber optics run from the lamps could illuminate areas of the dash.
This would also eliminate any superfluous styling of headlamps and concentrate more on their function.
Virtually every car today has stylised headlamps but the ones that are moving up towards the windshield are setting tomorrows styling trend just because its different if nothing else.We now have rear lamps running the full height of some hatchbacks.

DGate
 

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Re: 2010 Prius... with solar cells...

per a nytimes feed of a reuters clip of a nikkei article:
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/business ... oyota.html

Filed at 7:41 p.m. ET

TOKYO (Reuters) - Toyota Motor Corp plans to install solar panels on its next-generation Prius hybrid cars, becoming the first major automaker to use solar power for a vehicle, the Nikkei business daily reported on Monday.

The paper said Toyota would equip solar panels on the roof of the high-end version of the Prius when it redesigns the gasoline-electric hybrid car early next year, and the power generated by the system would be used for the air conditioning.

Toyota plans to use solar panels made by Kyocera Corp <6971.T>, the Nikkei said.
 

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So, you've got energy & CO2 problems, and a limited worldwide solar cell production capacity, so instead of mounting this limited supply in places (like your roof) where they can collect the maximum amount of solar energy, you stick them on a car which is likely to spend a lot of its life parked in garages or shady spots. Then you use the energy to run A/C even when the car's sitting unused for hours or days... Does this seem like a bright idea to anyone?
 

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On the other hand it might bring further efficiency to solar cells with increased production and development, plus bring the price down.
For every shaded car there's probably many more sitting in the sun and Toyota may use the power for something other than A/C like boost the PHEV side,certainly could in the winter.

DGate
 

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It is just a small step in the direction of solar assisted cars, but it will get the public used to seeing them on cars. The cells neeed not be silicon based and in fact silicon supplies are supposed to loosen up soon anyway with new factories coming on line. :D
 

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james said:
So, you've got energy & CO2 problems, and a limited worldwide solar cell production capacity, so instead of mounting this limited supply in places (like your roof) where they can collect the maximum amount of solar energy, you stick them on a car which is likely to spend a lot of its life parked in garages or shady spots. Then you use the energy to run A/C even when the car's sitting unused for hours or days... Does this seem like a bright idea to anyone?
Hopefully the original press release was a misstatement. Someone here may do the calculation and prove me wrong, but I suspect that the amount of solar energy that could be collected even in full sun would not suffice to run the A/C. And full sun would of course increase the heat load to be cooled! I suspect that what Toyota actually said was that it would run fans which would ventilate the car and keep the battery from getting cooked. Clever people here have rigged up an arrangement like this for the Insight.

On hot summer days I avoid parking on the roof of the parking garage at work because the car does get extremely hot.
 

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james said:
So, you've got energy & CO2 problems, and a limited worldwide solar cell production capacity, so instead of mounting this limited supply in places (like your roof) where they can collect the maximum amount of solar energy, you stick them on a car which is likely to spend a lot of its life parked in garages or shady spots. Then you use the energy to run A/C even when the car's sitting unused for hours or days... Does this seem like a bright idea to anyone?
You probably need a lot less solar power to run the A/C in a car than in a home. Vehicles in the south could benefit greatly from this because A/C often isn't an option, and driving locally just sucks the gasoline out of the car because of the A/C at the 12th stop light. And of course, the benefit of the solar panel is that when you need it most, it should probably be receiving the most energy.
 
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