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I live in Ohio where there are quite a few large hills I cross... I was wondering how much people allow themselves to slow down going up hill and speed up down hill to maintain mpg... since these hills can 'cause you to slow down quite a bit if you don't add gas. Also, if you need to speed up on hills, do you downshift or use assist? Try to add as many details as possible like, if you accelerate before a hill or something. Thanks! :D

-Mike
 

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I allow my speed to drop down to as low as 50 mph on a climb and use assist without downshifting. On the downslope I pick up speed so that the next hill can be climbed at least part of the way up before the speed falls back down to 50. Have fun, RIck
 

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I try to maintain speed, even on hills. I can usually climb hills at about 50 MPG on the instantaneous fuel meter using very little electric motor assist. (Although, I have a feeling you are talking about hills which are a bit more steep than I usually drive up).

On the way down the hill, it always seems I need to push down on the accelerator ever so slightly to get 150 MPG (not quite fuel cut, but the closest I can get to it without loosing speed because of regenerative braking. The car's computers always choose to start regenerative braking instead of coasting in fuel cut mode when gliding down hills...
Does anyone think this is not normal, or do any of you get the same thing?

~Martin
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Motty82, your post is confusing. I see the same thing, only it's not really regen-braking, it's fuel-cut mode... and when that happens I get infinite mpg, not less than 150.

Semi-truck drivers drive like Rick Reece described, and that's about what I try to do. On the highway I try to keep the instantaneous MPG over 75, and keep MPH above 55 (or sometimes faster depending on my mood). If MPH drops, I floor it to get assist, and if MPH exceeds the speed limit too much then I let up on the throttle. Also depends on whether people brake going down the hill... in that case I try to spot them real early and let up the throttle earlier, that way I can charge the battery the whole way down instead of coming up behind them and then being forced to use the physical brakes.
 

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Flooring it vs. downshifting

Does staying in 5th and 'flooring it' to get back to speed on highway driving give better mpg than a brief downshift to 4th?

I am confused as to how the hybrid technology plays against normal gears and efficiency.

If you are in a 'normal' car, and you are coasting in 5th or 6th and get too slow, then you may waste a lot of gas gunning it in the really high gear vs. downshifting to get an efficient acceleration and then dropping back into the cruising gear.

Is the Insight different here?

Help!
 

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Tim,
down the hill, it always seems I need to push down on the accelerator ever so slightly to get 150 MPG (not quite fuel cut, but the closest I can get to it without loosing speed because of regenerative braking.
What I meant by this is that it always seems my engine isn't idling at the high enough level of 1100 rpm to allow fuel cut to take place. It seems that if I let up on the clutch fast, fuel cut starts with regeneration. Although I do notice that sometimes if I let up on the clutch really slowly, it allows me to coast in fuel cut without loosing speed while NOT getting any regen energy in the process. Basically, I tend to try to get this to occur when going down a very slight decline
Reference:
http://www.insightcentral.net/encyclopedia/enfuelcut.html
Sorry it took so long to respond... didn't know how to answer when I read it before and I just came accross the posting again and was capable of thinking how to answer.
P.S. That is a good question Figgy....
~Martin
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Fuel cut without regen?

Is there any way to induce fuel cut mode without also incurring regenerative braking, short of putting the vehicle in neutral and turning off the engine manually? In my CVT, my battery stays fairly close to full most of the time (my commute is like a bowl -- uphill on both ends, so I get a coast when the car is cold, and an uphill to end my commute). I was playing with fuel cut on the trip home today, watching the L/100km display, and it was easy to see when it kicked in. I could get it without the brake being applied, but if I had the air going in auto mode, or if I slipped it into neutral, fuel cut couldn't kick in.

That it can't go into fuel cut mode when you're in neutral makes sense. But I can't maintain speed on the gentle downhills I have at the start of my daily commute each way with the regen kicked in when I'm in-gear. I generally end up slipping it into neutral because I can maintain speed with the engine idling at 1000 rpm, and if I'm feeling particularly peckish, sometimes I'll just turn the motor off entirely manually. Kind of an odd feeling, that. And the brakes are quite stiff when the car is turned off and all those little lights are glowing back at you as if to say "dude, you really shouldn't be driving a car when it's turned off like this". But the extra bump in gas mileage is worth the glove-wearing, coat-turned-up, hat-ears-turned-down action I sometimes suffer on cold mornings coasting down that first hill :)
 

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Is there any way to induce fuel cut mode without also incurring regenerative braking
My car seems to think otherwise... If I release the clutch really slowly, it seems to enter fuel cut while not regenerating any energy and thus slowing the car down. BUT, an other thing I sometimes need to do to get this to work is to take it out of gear and put it back in gear while releasing the clutch very slowly.
 
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