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Hello,
I am a new owner of a 2000 Insight, and would like to change my own oil in an attempt to save some money. Does anyone have specific details on removing the shield to access the drain plug, the tools and wrench/socket sizes for the shield and plug, how tightly the filter and plug should be replaced, how much oil is needed (exactly 3 quarts?), and anything else I should know....
Any assistance is greatly appreciated! Thanks
 

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I believe changing the oil and oil filter uses 2.7 quarts, and just changing the oil uses 2.5 or 2.6 quarts. There has been lots of discussion about this because dealers almost always overfill (well above the top fill line) because they dump in three full quarts, not to mention often using regular bulk oil they have at the shop. Most everyone uses Mobile 1 synthetic, 0W-20 or 5W-20 if your shop is out of 0W-20 which they stopped making recently.
 

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I do this task quite often, every 3750 miles. (I drive ALOT of miles) Here is my step by step procedure. I remove a few extra things so that I can CLEAN and wipe down stuff. (note: removing front tires gives more access and more light under the car, as well as a chance to clean the back side of the wheels and the wheelwell - brake area) step 1: remove center caps from front wheels. 2) loosen all eight lug nuts on the front wheels. 3) raise car with a floor jack, and place a jack stand under all 4 points, so the car is raised and level. 4) remove front wheels and set aside for cleaning 5) open hood and take off the oil fill cap 6) lay down under the car and take off all the required bolts, using a 10 millimeter socket. carefully pry out the forward 2 black plastics clips with a screwdriver, then remove the shiny aluminum guard. 7) Using a 17mm socket, remove the oil drain plug, draining into a suitable catch pan. let it drain for 10 minutes or so, till the drips stop. replace drain plug using a new crush washer, and tighten. 8) reach up and unscrew the oil filter (I can usually do it by hand; otherwise a small "cap" type filter wrench works great) let any excess oil drain out, then screw on the new filter according to the directions. I just install it hand tight. 9) wipe down and clean wherever you can reach, up into the engine bay, and all over the car's underbody. 10) get on your feet again and pour in 2.5 qts of oil. My first choice RED LINE 5-20 My 2nd choice is Mobil 1 0-20 11) start and run the engine for around 30 seconds, then check underneath for leaks, just to make sure. 12) clean all 3 panels you removed, then replace them. Long bolts go into the black resin panels, and the 4 shorter bolts go into the aluminum. 13) after I run the engine again, or take a short trip, I check the dipstick and top it off exactly, with about 1 tenth of a quart more.
The more one learns about the car and does more and more of his own maintenance, the more enjoyable it is!! Billy.......
 

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Thanks for oil change help

Thanks for the oil change at home help! I'm going to have to make do with ramps to start with, but I really appreciate all the specific details walking me through the process!!
Why do you opt for the Red Line 5W20 as opposed to the Mobil 1 0W20? Thanks again!
 

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Mobil 1 is excellent. But it's discontinued in 0-20; I bought 2 cases so I have plenty for now. RED LINE oil, in my opinion, is superior to any other out there. For my airplane I was searching for the best oil, and after over 40 hours of reading and studying, I found that Red Line has the absolute best test results in 7 different categories. They don't have 0-20, so 5-20 is the next best thing. Billy....
 

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"For my airplane I was searching for the best oil..."

You use an automotive oil in your airplane? I've always been told that it's a major no-no. Different additives that aren't compatible with aircraft engines, or something.

Not to mention that the tolerances and general rate of oil leaks & burning I've seen in most aircraft engines make expensive oil sort of pointless. Doesn't stay around long enough to do any good :)
 

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greetings James; I've been around & around with this issue for over 20 years. First, expensive oil? Aeroshell and Phillips Avoil are around 4 bucks per quart. Air cooled engines do have a greater temperature variation through their working cycle; but for many many years automotive oil worked great in VW and Porshce engines. Here is the bottom line and the current thinking: Aviation oil, although it is an "ashless dispersant", is 1940's and 50's technology. Modern Automotive oil is extremely advanced and simply fights friction and protects a whole lot better. Billy.....
 

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FYI

Edwin was up for his first oil change since the turbo, and Bluebelle was about due.

As I was hoping, Bluebelle's filter and drain plug were both just at the correct torque and her filter came off easily by hand. This was because her previous owner had her serviced at Grainger Honda in Savannah, GA were she lived her previous life. Apparently, they were competent. Edwin's oil filter is still there because it was put on by the shop so much overtightened that no amount of manual force will remove it. The drain plug came off, but was overtight as well. I am hoping that a strap wrench will get the filter off and that it is not cross threaded. The moral is that some shops are competetent, and others are not and that you are always better off doing it yourself.

Be prepared and get a wrench so that if your previous guys messed it up, you don't have your car sitting there with no oil in it and the old filter stuck until you can get it off somehow. One wonders how so called professionals can be so incompetent - do it yourself if you ever have the option.
 

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Regarding oil changes, be VERY careful about the oil drain bolt. The pan is made of magnesium, while the drain bolt is made of stainless steel. It is thus VERY easy to strip out the threads in the pan. The resulting repair can either be very cheap (Helicoil insert) or VERY expensive (new pan).

Because of this, I now use only about half the torque specified by Honda. I also wrap the threads of the bolt in Teflon tape, and use a new crush washer every time.
 

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Careful with that strap wrench

Yo, Figgy, be careful with that strap wrench, watch for your oil cooler to move if that goober that put it on with a strap ( or gorilla grip ). You may have to hold the oil cooler in place and grunt with the strap at the same time! And always make sure the old filter's o-ring is still on the old filter before you put on the new filter. Instant leak if you double up o-rings :!:
 

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Billy said:
Mobil 1 is excellent. But it's discontinued in 0-20
5-20W synthetic oil is just fine in the Insight, unless you live in artic conditions. Even then the only mpg hit will be when you start the engine. After a few minutes the oil heats up enough that the oil would be past the 5W rating anyway.
 

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Good advice. I do not think that anything spun other than the filter.

I definitely am careful to clean off the contact surface (and in the process make sure no old O-ring left there) and lube up the new filter O-ring with some fresh oil before putting it on.

I torque the drain plug with a new washer to 29 ft-lb as per the service manual. I haven't used teflon tape. No leaks, so I guess it is fine.
 

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figgy said:
<snip>
I torque the drain plug with a new washer to 29 ft-lb as per the service manual. I haven't used teflon tape. No leaks, so I guess it is fine.
A couple of other members who followed the 29 ft lb found the threads failed prematurely. I'd recomend something lighter.

But BEWARE :!:

Obviously at some point too loose will allow the plug to fall out and your engine will be scrap metal in less that a mile if you drive with insufficent oil pressure.

I'm still keeping my "eye' out for a dial type torque wrench that I can borrow to measure how much force I've been using. I'd _estimate_ around 20 ft lbs. Nor have is seen a beam type accurate enough to meainingfully read in this low a range. And don't forget a new crushwasher on every change :!:

HTH! :)
 
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