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Hi everybody! I Live in Michigan and just started driving my 2002 MT gen 1. I previously drove a '94 Mercury Villager, and it had few problems in the snow, so I am wondering if I could get some advice for my Insight:

-How important would snow/winter tires be?

-Should I remove the skirts to avoid massive snow buildup?

-any other winter tips:)

Thanks!

Greg
 

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Hi gmwnuk,

Winter tires offer a definite advantage.

Don't worry about the skirts, no problems there.

Watch out for wet slushy snow as when it sprays up and back from the front wheels (like a boat's bow wave) it can actually rip the aerodynamic panels away from the bottom of the car. They will peel away from the front and fold under the car where they will drag on the road and make a heck of lot of noise in the car. I thought I'd lost a wheel!

You may have to control the heater fan speed yourself to keep the windows defogged under some weather conditions. The "auto" setting works on interior temperature alone and turns the fan speed down too low to keep the windows clear.

The Insight is not a good car for plowing through snowdrifts! It's so low and light that it will ride up on hard packed drifts like a toboggan. Once your wheels leave the ground your like a turtle on its back. If its a big storm, take the bus or stay home :)


Enjoy,
Bill
 

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One more thing:

If the car is outside when the temp gets down below -20F (I think), you'll get the shock of your life when you turn the key and the car uses the 12V starter motor to crank start rather then the IMA motor.

Every time it happens I immediately release the key wondering what the heck I've done! :)
 

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I guess moving to Ocala is out of the question...? :rolleyes:

Your Insight will do just fine. All the above advice and commentary is spot on. Drive it like a Civic... :D
 

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One more thing:

If the car is outside when the temp gets down below -20F (I think), you'll get the shock of your life when you turn the key and the car uses the 12V starter motor to crank start rather then the IMA motor.

Every time it happens I immediately release the key wondering what the heck I've done! :)
lol...:)...It is funny how we get used to our IMA startup. In New Hampshire, the 12v starter gets used on some of the coldest days and I have the same reaction.

JoeCVT = Just your average CVT owner
 

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If you're looking to hold on to as much of your summer fuel economy as possible, you'll need a hot air intake, a grille block, and a block heater. The hot air intake allows lean burn at low temperatures, and the block heater reduces the amount of time you spend on warm-up.

I already have my lower grille 100% blocked. I'm going to panel the bottom of the engine bay to the firewall, install a radiator fan indicator light, and see if a 100% upper grille block is appropriate.
 

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Robert-

I think it would be easier to get a Scan Gauge and watch the engine temperature, making sure it doesn't go above 204.
 

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Yes, that would be easier, indeed. Is a coolant temperature of 205 a guarantee that the fan is on, and a temperature below that a guarantee that the fan is off?
 

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Yes. 205 is the temp the radiator fan turns on. I've never heard of an exception.

Though, I guess I'm not absolutely certain that if you went above 204 and the fan turned on, that it would immediately turn off once you hit 204 again. I believe it would, but I can't back that up without digging through the forum more. Can anyone else say this with 100% certainty?
 

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We just drove from PA down to Hilton Head Island SC during this weeks Mid-Atlantic snow storm via I-95 with our Insight. We have the Bridgestone snow tires and the Insight handled superbly on the trip while passing many other cars that had spun out. However, we did lose some of our under-body wind shield panel. Was able to reinstall most of it with grap washers and a heat gun to straighten it out. Will replace it come spring.
 

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i would add snow chains but that depends on how much snow there is, but they cant hurt to have with you

maybe a tow rope if you get stuck and others are offering to pull you free

jump leads in the event that the 12V goes flat, but as i know it the HV (highvoltage) is going to keep it charged... but hey just an idea

some say a block heater.. i would go for that, but if you have the money spend them on a fuel driven one, you will loose about 0,5 liters of fuel each hour it runs, but you rarely need it to run for that long, on a 1,4 liters engine half an hours will get the cooling water to 55 degress C.... and added bonus is that you can preheat anyware, not just where there is a plug near by. of course your mpg will drop, but it comes to mind that you will have much less wear on the engine

as for radiator block and hot air i found a very good thread about it:

http://www.insightcentral.net/forum...iator-block-hot-air-intake-modifications.html

somewhere i saw a guy that made a complete fireproof blanket that could be zipped around the engine... then you only need to put the same kind of insulation around the hoses that you put around heating pipes inside a house and you are complete... but use some tool like scangauge to watch for temps

tires... go get a set of real winter tires... not the all year round stuff. i drive bus for a living and the company put all year round stuff on to save money and maxing the profit or the shareholders, but it is just the worst thing to drive with... either we spin to much or cant even leave the stops. or we skid like we are break dancing all over the road. so dont save money on tires

that's about what i can come up with
 
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