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Simple question. What material is needed to seal the holes//clip sockets and any cracks on the roof trim?

We know the answer is NOT GE silicone
We know the answer is NOT 3M urethane

What substance (brand and exact product) is the correct one which will, assuming the surface was adequately cleaned, seal the leak on the first time, and once you've done it you won't have to go back and do it again for at least 10 years?

Like, you have done it, and you've never had the leak return, you got it right on the first try, you've never had to take the pieces off and try again. Ideally you've used it on multiple Insights with 100.00% success rate.
 

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Thank you for asking this. I want to know this answer too.

I ran some experiments on adhesives and though I don't have a solution I do have what is promising, tested by glueing plastic tabs of similar material to a piece of painted Insight.

Roughing up the surface a little is promising. Epoxy was not promising - it delaminated. Loctite super glue (thin cyanoacrylate) was not promising. Gluemasters Thick Viscosity Industrial Strength Cyanoacrylate Adhesive is promising and I now use it on other stuff: when I pried off the plastic piece it was the paint that failed!

Hondabond HT is promising; it adhered well to a scuffed paint surface. The Hondabond itself failed but it took some twisting. I scuffed the plastic piece but I don't recall how I prepped them, that is, did I allow a coat of the thick cyanoacrylate adhesive to dry first as a primer before applying the Hondabond and assembling? I think I did. But on closer examination on the second piece of the photo below, the thick glue stuck to the Hondabond and delaminated from the plastic in a few places.
Shoe Automotive lighting Automotive parking light Hood Motor vehicle

If I were to move forward with this I would test again with either HT or the thick glue alone, then the thick glue as a primer and HT as the adhesive. I do not know if the HT sticks better to the scuffed plastic alone, or if the HT is applied first as a primer then scuffed.

I halted this work before using it on a roof for several reasons. One was, the plastic clips come with gaskets. Should I use them? If so, I can't use the adhesives as pictured. Second, these get assembled without being able to apply glue around the hole after. How then would I seal around the hole? Third: how would you break these apart if glued solidly and you needed to take apart for windshield work? Finally, another member got clever and used toilet hold-down bolts and drilled all the through the car to secure the trim while making it removable. This would certainly provide the force to compress rubber gaskets. I really liked that idea and considered doing it. But the recent post of that old Honda video showing how they built the car highlighted how those pillars are a structural component to keep the roof from folding up the car into the driver like an accordion during a head-on crash. Drilling through those and adding a bit would have an unpredictable effect.

When I asked the same question (which it appears you read) I could not be certain what suggestions people had that actually had stood the test of time. And my tests do not answer the question, but led me to believe that regular epoxy and super glue are not that great (I already knew that silicone glue was not from its use on another car) but Hondabond HT is promising and that thick super glue, found while searching for adhesives for this experiment, has become my go-to adhesive for various things (though I don't know if/how it breaks down over time).
Automotive tire Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Automotive design Car

Above: the plastic pieces using the thick adhesive took more effort than the HT to remove and it was the bond between paint and primer that tended to fail first, though in some places the bond between the thick cyanoacrylate and plastic failed.

PS got the red fender - thank you!!!!
 

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2000 Honda Insight
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I'd like to fix my leaks without removing the pillar covers. Maybe someday I'll feel like I can put the carpet back in. :)
 
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@Natalya - I didn't do dozens of them, but in 2018 I used this stuff on both sides, purchased from the local ACE Hardware, I do believe:
DAP Alex Plus Clear Acrylic Latex All Purpose Caulk 10.1 oz - Ace Hardware

@jcburk, the present owner is on the forum. Maybe he can attest to its non-leakiness.

@Gasoline Fumes - my car had caulking between the garnishes from the windshield to where they ended. They leaked, anyway. Good luck finding an exterior solution. It's not that difficult a job. Here's my description, starting on post #25 of this: Any secrets for wet seatbelt fix to Save $$$ | Page 2 | Honda Insight Forum (insightcentral.net)
 

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For the wet seat belt fix I used windshield flowable silicone on that rear plastic clip. Filled in that entire area with a pool around the clip. Let it fully dry, then painted over it. All the other clips I dabbed some around the hole and rubber seal before pushing in the clips. Also used it for the small plastic trim between that rear plastic clip and hatch. Didn't have to dig out the old sealant. Leak free since 2015. Recently I used it on my passenger head light and fixed that leak without even taking it out of the car.
 

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If you want overkill and don't mind spending a bit extra, I'd suggest aerospace grade sealant meeting or exceeding spec MIL-PRF-81733. Working as a mechanic for an airline, you see this stuff all over the fuselage including pressurized areas. Whether you are working on Boeing, Airbus, Embraer, whatever, or whichever airline, they all agree on this stuff.
Once it's on there, it will be on there for life. Fuel resistant (used inside fuel tanks), oil resistant, prevents corrosion, endures extreme temps (-65*F - +250*F), and is tough as nails. It sucks to remove and don't get it on your clothes.

Next question- is this needed?
Probably not. If Jue is using Hondabond and has been for years w/o issues, that's good enough for me.

I did this job (A-pillar trim and rear roof seams) about a year ago with Permatex Ultra Grey, kinda similar to Hondabond. I can't swipe these Semkits from work unless it's "expired" and I didn't want to spend the big $. But if my repair with the cheap stuff fails, i'll probably try again with the fancy stuff.

 

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I've done 3 different cars and none have leaked after heavy rains. I use DAP silicone exterior door/window sealant. It's made for exterior weather and allows some flexing once dried while still maintaining a seal. It's available at Home Depot, Lowe's, etc. Good construction stuff, inexpensive.

I wonder if the bigger issue is prep/application...getting the area clean, stuffing the product under the main leak tab up top and also generously around the other clip holes before install. Then when the A pillar trim is reinstalled, one firm push with no bounce that could mess up the seal. Just push on, then leave alone for a day so it can seal without being disturbed.
 

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@jcburk, the present owner is on the forum. Maybe he can attest to its non-leakiness.
bad news - It's started leaking again. Driver's side isn't so bad, passenger side gets the seat wet in the event of a torrential downpour. It's on my to-do list.

I plan on going back in with Hondabond to see if I can get it to stop for good.
 

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2001 CVT 鈥淐herry Bomb鈥 338K+ Miles
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I鈥檓 glad this was brought up. I鈥檝e been wanting to ask as I鈥檓 leaking everywhere! If my Insight was a boat, I鈥檇 be sinking鈥
 
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bad news - It's started leaking again. Driver's side isn't so bad, passenger side gets the seat wet in the event of a torrential downpour. It's on my to-do list.

I plan on going back in with Hondabond to see if I can get it to stop for good.
@jcburk - P.O.s are always incompetent doofs, aren't they?
I was hoping to be an exception. Apparently not!
Let's hope you're smarter than I was. Have fun with the clippy-things!
 
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@jcburk - P.O.s are always incompetent doofs, aren't they?
I was hoping to be an exception. Apparently not!
Let's hope you're smarter than I was. Have fun with the clippy-things!
馃ぃ 馃ぃ 馃ぃ 馃ぃ 馃ぃ 馃ぃ 馃ぃ 馃ぃ 馃ぃ 馃ぃ
 
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I have found hands down the best sealant/caulking ever. It seals everything 100%, every time and it鈥檚 only $100.00 a tube.

Scott
 

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What happens if you don鈥檛 get it in the exact right place and it still leaks?

Sam
 

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Simple question. What material is needed to seal the holes//clip sockets and any cracks on the roof trim?

We know the answer is NOT GE silicone
We know the answer is NOT 3M urethane

What substance (brand and exact product) is the correct one which will, assuming the surface was adequately cleaned, seal the leak on the first time, and once you've done it you won't have to go back and do it again for at least 10 years?

Like, you have done it, and you've never had the leak return, you got it right on the first try, you've never had to take the pieces off and try again. Ideally you've used it on multiple Insights with 100.00% success rate.
Try Marine tex it will bond anything to anything
 

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So of course you have to take it apart again. Or is this covered by warranty on the product?
Sam
 

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Have you considered using transparent T-7000 glue to seal off? This is the stuff that gets used to provide water tight seal for mobile phone back covers and displays and it is super cheap.
 
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