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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering... especially when I opened the driver door and saw the warning about heat next to the label that says what the proper tire pressure is, if the batteries could be damaged by hot summers like in Texas.

They say it can get over 160 degrees F inside a car and the lithium ion batteries which are under the back seat could get that hot, no?

Is that a problem?

Of course I will be trying to keep my car cooler by using a solar shade and cracking the windows.
 

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I was wondering... especially when I opened the driver door and saw the warning about heat next to the label that says what the proper tire pressure is, if the batteries could be damaged by hot summers like in Texas.

They say it can get over 160 degrees F inside a car and the lithium ion batteries which are under the back seat could get that hot, no?

Is that a problem?

Of course I will be trying to keep my car cooler by using a solar shade and cracking the windows.
3rd gen forum already? Wow.

As a Phoenix resident, I scoff at your notion of heat... :)

Though you have us beat on misery index... your temperature + humidity makes one question life itself. Fortunately, the higher humidity doesn't matter to the battery.

Anyway, yes and no.

Interior temperatures generally don't hit 160°F unless it's a black car with no tint, a black interior, and it's continually turned to ensure it gets maximum sun exposure. Even then, probably not much more than 140°F interior air temperature.

Furthermore, the lithium battery is an insulated mass that doesn't absorb/dissipate heat quickly except through operation and its cooling system. Here in AZ in my Black Prius, if I DON'T use a sunshade or crack my windows, my afternoon NiMH battery temp peaks at about 120°F when it's 110°F outside.

Simply using a sunshade and cracking your windows should ensure that you never come anywhere close to 160°F. If you want to take it another step, drop the windows about 4" with the A/C set to full blast for the first 1/2 mile to purge most of the heated air from the car.
 

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I went to high school in Las Vegas. It got so hot, that when it went way down to 75 at night, I felt really cold enough to wear a jacket. I gave all that up to live here on the Oregon coast, where 75 is a really hot day in the summer.

But heat and lithium ion batteries is a problem. Awhile back I read a news story about the temporary grounding of the Boeing 767 due to fire in the Li battery compartment. Later fixed by better ventilation. Happily the 19 Insight solves this with a fan system and with vents beneath the rear seat.

My thanks to Samwhichse for posting a link to the press kit which has loads of interesting technical information (2019 Honda Insight Press Kit - Honda News), where it says:

"...Battery temperature is controlled by a fan system that pulls air from the interior of the vehicle via vents located beneath the rear seat bottom. The battery pack is covered by a special warranty that covers defects in material and workmanship for eight-years/100,000-miles or ten-year/150,000 miles depending on the state of purchase/registration."
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
But heat and lithium ion batteries is a problem. Awhile back I read a news story about the temporary grounding of the Boeing 767 due to fire in the Li battery compartment. Later fixed by better ventilation. Happily the 19 Insight solves this with a fan system and with vents beneath the rear seat.

My thanks to Samwhichse for posting a link to the press kit which has loads of interesting technical information (2019 Honda Insight Press Kit - Honda News), where it says:

"...Battery temperature is controlled by a fan system that pulls air from the interior of the vehicle via vents located beneath the rear seat bottom. The battery pack is covered by a special warranty that covers defects in material and workmanship for eight-years/100,000-miles or ten-year/150,000 miles depending on the state of purchase/registration."
Thanks. Nice Honda News link... but the battery temperature control is during operation, is it not? What if the car is just sitting there in the hot sun and the temp inside the car gets above 150 degrees? Is there a fan that turns on when the car is not in use to cool the battery? In that case it would seem to need to pull in outside air rather than interior air that might be 150+ degrees.

I'll be sure to use a solar shield and crack my windows when possible... and my windows are tinted so hopefully it will never get that hot in the car (although the interior is black and the exterior is a dark (modern steel))... but I'm still curious as to how "dangerous" the heat might be for the battery if the battery did get to 150 degrees or above.
 

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I "assume" the G2 is like the G1. If high temps are detected in the IMA battery. The system will "shut down" both in assist and regen. IIRR the G1 is around 140-160 F.

HTH
Willie
 

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Thanks. Nice Honda News link... but the battery temperature control is during operation, is it not? What if the car is just sitting there in the hot sun and the temp inside the car gets above 150 degrees? Is there a fan that turns on when the car is not in use to cool the battery? In that case it would seem to need to pull in outside air rather than interior air that might be 150+ degrees.
When I was in Las Vegas heat was never a problem for under the hood batteries, though it was for radiators and engine overheating. AC was not common then and windows were down most of the time. Leaving the windows up on the hottest days (125+) can get ya some serious pet or baby killing heat in the interior of a car. But all it took to prevent it, is to lock the car with all 4 windows opened a little at the top. This gave enough flow through to prevent the worst interior heat problems.

Of course the '19 Insight Touring trim includes a remote engine warmup feature that allows you to remotely run the engine and cool down the interior before you open the door :).

I'll be sure to use a solar shield and crack my windows when possible... and my windows are tinted so hopefully it will never get that hot in the car (although the interior is black and the exterior is a dark (modern steel))... but I'm still curious as to how "dangerous" the heat might be for the battery if the battery did get to 150 degrees or above.
When I was in the USAF I was responsible for "battery maintenance" for a bank of nickel hydride batteries. "Maintenance" meant keeping air flowing through the battery room and keeping the cells filled with water. If the water dried up, first they'll start to smell, then they'll burn, perhaps igniting other stuff and burning down the building. I know that Li batteries more easily burn than nickel hydride, but I don't know at what temperature or if they give off a warning smell or not. I also know that the introduction of Li batteries into the mass car market has been delayed several years, until now, because of this problem.

So I wouldn't worry about it. I'll assume that the battery pack heat can escape under the car (though I may check after I buy one), and some cracked windows on the hottest days can provide any added insurance I may need in order to be at ease. Finally, I suspect the reduced battery warranty, down to 100,000 miles, may address long term heat effects on the battery.
 
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