Honda Insight Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,541 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My local supermarket chain has a recycle container for batteries. Buy your new ones and drop off your old ones at the same time.

One day, Alexander (my 12 year old son) and I had an idea: how many batteries that people throw away are actually still good?

We asked - and were allowed - to collect the contents of the recycle box. The contents comprised AA, AAA, C, D, 9V and assorted button cells.

We tested the batteries with a multimeter, and found that:

- about 1/3rd were dead flat (eg 1.2V) or were leaking

- about 1/3rd were still useable in applications where a slightly lower voltage didn't matter (electric motor toys, LED torches that use a regulator, etc) - these were typically about 1.4V

- about 1/3rd were as-new - 1.5V plus.. some even 1.6V!

Pictured below is our current collection. It goes down as Alexander uses them up (mostly in toys); it goes up after we collect more from the recycle bin.

 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,702 Posts
Juice extractor

I wonder if you built a simple clip system to attach cells type batteries into a huge parallel store how much energy you could extract from them.

I have no idea on the energy levels in typical dry cell batteries non rechargeable.
I'm sure it wont be worth the effort... (Note this is not a serious idea) :)

Someone sitting there constantly swapping batteries as your magic box sucks them dry into some alternative store..
Sounds like a terrible minimum wage job..

I think just using them in less demanding applications to extract maximum energy is easiest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,007 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,558 Posts
Seems like the results from EEVblog are negative for this product as installed on brand new cells,
Batteroo testing - Page 1
but, ...there's a potential benefit to extending capacity in 'dead' cells [as seen from a google spreadsheet of test results derived from EEVblog members. ]
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/18K9c2YAT0d0QABGYGpzItbvDcgfAQCRUtloEzzfXADU/edit#gid=0

The product appeared not up to marketing claims [touting up to 8x life] as noted , and this was challenged in several YT videos, but, ... results for the Batterizer installed on a "dead" battery allowed ~1hr more time in a couple AAA name-brand batteries tested. That worked out to about 14% more use of the dead cells using the device.
______________________________________

fwiw: A home-built Joule Thief project could be instructive in understanding. :)

"How to make an authentic Joule Thief. - by bigclivedotcom on YT.
, and
from another interesting site :
Supercapacitor Joule Thief - GreatScott!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,421 Posts
I think curves like this kinda tell you how much there is to be gained:

Discharge tests of Alkaline AA batteries

The area under the curve is analogous to the energy storage. When you substitute time on the horizontal axis for Ah, you get current at a voltage over time... which is EXACTLY the energy content of the cell.

As you can see, the area under the curve between 1.0V and 0.7V tends to be small compared to the area to the left of 1.0V.

For devices that cut off at > 1V, then there's more potential.

It depends a lot on the discharge current. In higher drain applications of lower drain cells, a near 100% increase in usable energy is possible; however, the 14% number is more likely to be the case most of the time as most alkaline cell applications are not particularly high drain.

Julian's method was WAY cheaper and more effective with a consistent 100% improvement in comparison to the total capacity prior to the exercise... :)
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top