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Discussion Starter #1
I'm a new owner with 2,500 miles racked up. I know the official engine break in period is 600 mi, if I remember correctly from the owners manual. I'm curious what other owners are experiencing with regard to changes in mileage trend up to 10,000 mi. or so. I think the fluctuation I'm seeing right now is probably weather related since we're in the middle of summer here.

With modest care for achieving good mileage, I'm seeing 44 MPG consistently in mixed driving using ECON w/AC; resetting the mileage computer daily.

Also, I'm inclined to keep a 3k mi oil changing regiment, particularly for at least the first few oil changes to remove any possible metal particulate shed during the break in period. Even if this isn't needed, which it may not be on a modern engine, it can't hurt.
 

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"Also, I'm inclined to keep a 3k mi oil changing regiment, particularly for at least the first few oil changes to remove any possible metal particulate shed during the break in period. Even if this isn't needed, which it may not be on a modern engine, it can't hurt."

I would wait on changing the oil when the car tells you to. There are specific reasons and years of Honda experience that will get you 10,000 - 11,500 miles per oil change. Their designs are much smarter than you or I. Why fight it. The engine needs these particles to break in the engine. Wait. I know it's hard, but wait. My first oil change was at 10,800 miles and now I'm averaging over 50 MPG per tank!
 

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I didnt see an increase or more torque til 10 thousand miles. I think the computer issetup to limit performance til you travel soo many miles.

Changing oil early just wastes filters and oil.
 

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That is fantastic and very helpful news... I'm up to about 4K on mine now and very eager to change the oil, but the longer i drive it and the longer I seem to wait, the better my MPG is getting... This is really really great! Who'd a thunk it 10000 miles between oil changes, that can only mean so much more for the life of the drivetrain.

Cobb, you really think that the computer is holding out? That would be very interesting.
 

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I just got mine about 3 days ago and my worst trip so far was 56mpg....the rest were between 58 and 60....going off the A B and C trips.....I'm doing everything to try to improve mpg..no a/c...slow take offs...coasting to lights....I have 250 miles total on the car... these are about 70% hwy 30 city....so far very happy with my purchase
 

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Approaching 7K miles

....and now consistently getting 45-46 mpg in mixed driving. On two longer trips, have hit 50-51 mpg. First several tankfuls when new were at 40-42 mpg.

I not gonna demand that it gets better than that in the future; those mpg figures are already over the EPA estimates for the car (41city/43hwy).
 

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Discussion Starter #7
update @ 4k miles

Mileage results are fairly consistent. I do notice that high mileage numbers become _really_ sensitive to various factors. I'm easily seeing a 8mpg+/16% penalty for running A/C in economy mode. Morning commute w/o A/C, I can usually hit 48-52mpg.
 

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Why low mileage?

I've had my Insight EX for less than two weeks, but I really am worried about the low mileage. Yesterday, it was down to 34 mpg average. Down from 37+ mpg.

Also, after the first day, the engine seldom auto stops at stop lights, full stops. I was told 1) the engine has to warm up and 2) the battery has to be "quite" full. My battery usually has one slim dark space at the top. I don't recall it ever being absolutely full.

What is normal for this battery image? My recollection is that it was not competely full when I got the car. It did get down to about a third showing dark (meaning incomplete charge, right?), after I drove about 5 miles to a destination during rain at night, so the wipers were in use and lights were on, and heatalso as it was cold (low 40's). The tire pressure warning was also on.

I was going to the dealer the next day anyway (day 3 of driving the Insight), and they found the tires were all below 30psi (and they were not cold, as I'd driven about 20 miles) and inflated them all to 33. I managed to leave my good tire gauge in my old car, so have to buy another to be able to check for myself what the cold psi actually is.

The service manager told me that the auto stop wasn't working due to a low battery. There are steepish, longish hills on the way to the dealership, so even though I'd driven almost 20 miles, that was not enough, apparently, to get the battery up. Also, at that point, I hadn't been lightly riding the brake pedal to increase charging (that is what I need to do, right?).

I also have slight inclines on the final two miles to my house, so I don't have a way to charge up the battery to have it fuller on that part of my driving.

Would inflating the tires to a higher psi help?

I've picked up from reading here and on other Insight blogs that I should be using the brake, lightly, to get a higher recharge rate to the battery. I also read that in city driving I should get up to the posted speed quickly, then back off to allow regeneration. But I also watched videos which seemed to indicate I should accelerating more slowly. Should I be sort of feathering my gas pedal pressure? Seems tiresome and annoying, but how do I get better regeneration?

I seldom place my full foot on the gas pedal, just the ball of my foot, but I suppose one could lead foot it that way also, eh? But I haven't been doing that. Actually, I've been worried about not getting up to freeway speed fast enough and worry about causing irritation or problems for other drivers.

I'm still trying to remember to turn off the radio, so it's not on when I start the car. That's kind of annoying, but I can live with it...when I finally make it a habit. I also read the heat/fan should be turned off as well? If this is so important to good mileage why didn't Honda make it an option so it would be automatic?

I'm also having to learn that the bright dashboard lights do not mean I've turned the headlights on! In my other cars, the dash didn't get really bright unless the headlights were on. I've driven farther that I thought possible with the daytime safety lights on.

But the mileage is the big issue: What to do?

I'm beginning to think my driving patterns mean I should not have gone with the Insight, but the Prius, which gets better mileage in city driving. I've been getting a sick feeling in my stomach about my decision....

Any suggestions? :-?

Help!!
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
The biggest lesson I've learned thus far is that mileage above the EPA estimate of 41/43 is really sensitive to anything that may throw it off. I _really_ like the car; everything about it. For me the potential for great mileage is just a bonus. (I'm in the camp that thinks catastrophic global warming is BS and is more politics than science). I realize others may have bought an Insight primarily for mileage though.

First off make sure you're not running it in 'sport' mode, S position on the shifter. Could explain your auto-stop problem. Econ mode also makes heavier use of auto-stop.

Low tire pressure will definitely drop your mileage. With the onset of cold weather and 8 weeks of not checking it, mine dropped to 27.5 psi and mileage was frequently around 32mpg. The recommended PSI should get you around the EPA estimate of 41/43. I've frequently run my tires around 10% over spec, 3 psi (36 total) in the case of the Insight. For safety reasons I cannot recommend that you ever over inflate your tires. It can negatively affect traction and handling and in the end be dangerous.

Some say cold weather can negatively affect combustion efficiency; i.e. cold intake air, longer warm up periods, etc.

RE: battery, I wouldn't worry about the battery state too much. In the end, the energy all ultimately comes from the same place, the gas tank. I've seen the engine will actually charge the battery on level terrain at cruising speed if the battery is low. It's not up to you to charge it.

RE: regen-braking, sane driving first, efficiency second. Light longer braking will probably store more energy. I try not to bury the charge needle. If you brake too hard your heads up display will glow blue. Feathering can convince the engine to switch to battery only for brief periods. But eventually, all of that energy comes from using gasoline.

RE: radio off when the car starts, my un-qualified opinion is that's bunk. It's not that much power.

If mileage is _the_ most important thing to you then maybe a Prius is a better choice. Personally, for me, the handling, looks and character of the Insight and the fact that it's a Honda are the most important, great mileage is just a bonus.

These are my observations. While my driving habits may not be the absolute most efficient (i.e. I like to listen to the radio which does technically use energy), they're good enough to consistently get 42-50mpg with some effort when not in stop and go traffic. I'm coming from driving a truck getting 16mpg. Even 32mpg in stop and go traffic is a win for me.

I hope you enjoy your new car.
 

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catsight, good advice above. There are lots of factors that effect fuel economy and a 5 mile trip between the 2 cars will give misleading information,. The insight system just helps out where as the prius can travel in ev mode for a few miles up to 35mph. True during a 5mile run it may beat the Honda, however somewhere later on that energy needs to be put back and the prius will loose its gain over the Honda.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
One other thing occurred to me while thinking about another thread on the forum. Ethanol. My mileage is a little off lately. It could be the fact that I'm approaching my first oil change (15% on the MID). In the past, ethanol began life as a winter fuel additive. There is likely some amount of ethanol the in fuel supply year round these days. What I don't know is whether the ethanol % is still increased in the winter time. In the end, the impact is no more than 3.5% for fully 10% ethanol). E10 is "up to 10% ethanol". I don't know how much the percentage varies over the course of the year.

Probably not the sole culprit; just another factor in winter mileage.
 

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Everything effects fuel economy. I travel rural and the city of Richmond, VA. I try to buy gas in the rural area as it has less ethanol and less effect on mpg. Also winter vs summer grade makes a difference.

Also the car uses more gas to maintain operating temp as well as heat for its passenger. In many cases with the heat set to a moderate temp or blower speed will cancel auto stop and fuel cut.
 

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everything you guys have mentioned has an impact on MPG's. You did miss one thing though .. Winter fuel blends, depending on your location and as early as september the unleaded fuel is changed for winter use to resist freezing. This winter blend have impacted my mpg's in other car by as much as 7mpg. I have over 200 tank fulls in other vehicles logged through fuelly.com that show the down trend during fall and winter and back up in late spring summer.

So reach a stable number for this time, track it, and watch it rise in the summer.

Currently my insight averaged 48mpg with winter blend. I am in florida where we have no noticeable winter, but still get the fuel blend. I can't wait to get more practice to sustain averages above 50mpg.
 

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Thanks for the thoughtful, info packed replies re: mileage

I'm looking forward to some longer drives and hope to see an improvement.
 

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My wife is averaging 47 MPG in the Econ mode. She has less than 1k miles on it and drives on streets and the Interstate. Despite living in the Arizona desert she drove her 2000 Insight, normally with the AC off since she avoided heat of the day driving, and averaged 67 MPG with that car.
 

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We just came back from a trip from Central Florida to Huntsville, Alabama. Have had our Honda Insight 2010 for about 6 months. Well, it was very interesting. Our mileage going to Huntsville was 47 mph. We did have a head wind, and the temp was near freezing. Coming home it was warmer--can't think of anything else different. As we pulled into our drive way from the return trip our mileage read 53. Isn't it interesting our mileage varied 6 mph going and coming.
 

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What speed do you typically drive at on interstate trips that you obtained 47 and 53? I am looking to purchase an Insight someday, but was scared by an article one magazine wrote about the car can loose 15 mpg driving it at highway speed vs 55 mpg. I drive 63 to 65 here in Kentucky even though they raised the speed to 70. I drive during off peak times and i have no problem driving slower speeds. I currently can get 41 on my Yaris during the summer on the highway, i want to feel assured I'll get at least 10 mpg over this to warrant the change in vehicles. Its sounds promising. Ron
 

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What speed do you typically drive at on interstate trips that you obtained 47 and 53? I am looking to purchase an Insight someday, but was scared by an article one magazine wrote about the car can loose 15 mpg driving it at highway speed vs 55 mpg. I drive 63 to 65 here in Kentucky even though they raised the speed to 70. I drive during off peak times and i have no problem driving slower speeds. I currently can get 41 on my Yaris during the summer on the highway, i want to feel assured I'll get at least 10 mpg over this to warrant the change in vehicles. Its sounds promising. Ron
We drive about 60 on the interstate. Drive at an even pace, let cars go around if they wish. I might add we drive 35mph where we live which is the speed limit. We keep our average mileage above 50 mpg.at home. We don't have many hills here in central Florida and again try to drive at an even pace. The nice thing the Insight has is a gauge the lets you know constantly what mileage you are getting. You can see it go down when you climb hills and go up when you are coming downhill.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
update - 12 months and 14,500 miles

Well it's been a year. I'm just coming up on my second oil change (B1).

The good: a moderate upward bias on mileage of maybe 10% to 47-48mpg with some care given to mileage. Many fair weather days I can easily hit 50-52 MPG.

The bad: winter gas. Add in the cold weather factor and you're looking at 38 MPG. With talk floating about of E15 gas coming on the market, and/or E10 becoming a standard year round blend, it's a factor for the foreseeable future. Speeds over 60 MPH will knock you down some (3-4 MPG).

With careful driving habits we see these high mileage numbers over the EPA estimate. The problem is, the higher you reach into the mileage high scores, the easier it is for _anything_ to throw off that number. The EPA estimate is reasonable for your average driver.

More good news: the car is still a joy to drive. I just checked the Kelly Blue Book private party sale value estimate: $22,995, $500 over what I paid for it. Say what you want about KBB's numbers, that's still not bad first year depreciation for any new car.

If you're thinking about buying a new Prius, you'll get consistently higher mileage. If you like Honda's design sensibility and enjoy the Honda driving experience then take a test drive in the Insight or the CRZ.

Thanks Honda.

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Peace_Winds_Japan__English_Edition

This is a Japanese relief organization. This probably gives your donation a higher likelihood of actually going to the relief effort you choose rather than the American Red Cross. Their American partner org is Mercy Corps:

90-Day Report from Japan | Mercy Corps
 

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Ditto

It's been 15 months and 21K miles on the Insight, and oceanconsulting's experiences and mpg numbers are exactly the same as mine, with one exception.
That exception is with the winter mpg decline. We only experienced one tank full at below 40 mpg (38.5) in late Nov. 2010. After that, the car got 42-44 through the February. Not sure how much a role driving/gassing up in NC played in those numbers.
 
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