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Mario just explained it better than I could have.

The EFAS PCBs I make now first send an approximately 2mph signal, then after holding the button down for 0.75 seconds it switches to the 1mph signal which it will output for the next 2.5 seconds. This way if your clutch switch was off, or if you didn't have one, you just continue to hold the EFAS button down for about a second before releasing and it will stay auto-stopped even without clutch or brake pressed.

If you do have a clutch switch on you can hold it until it begins to auto-stop (less than 0.75 seconds) and then let go and it will stay auto-stopped until the clutch switch is turned off or you tap the gas or shift into gear. The next time (and however many times you want) you go back into auto-stop just by shifting into neutral and holding the button so long as your clutch switch is on -- no need to press the brake pedal now.

Photo 1 -- PCBs -- look how far they've come. The black one up top could only output one version of the signal at a time, and it used a physical DPDT relay to break the clutch switch signal. The green ones are newer, they have the variable speed output, they also have 3 solid state SPDT relays, one for VSS, one for clutch switch, and one for the OAT line. One of the new green ones is missing a resistor and relay. It's going to an Insight that's in a warmer climate (Atlanta) so it doesn't need to fool the outside ambient temp.

Photo 2 -- This is a WIP inside my Insight. I worked a week ago on moving my switch location. It WAS on the shifter, but I never worked out a good way to get the button to stay on the shifter. :( Now however, I removed the button cap and drilled some holes in a small aluminum plate and I've mounted it so that when you're in neutral if you push left past the 1s2//2nd gate it will bump the metal plunger and push it down. I don't super like it like this, and I may re-do it, because it's hard to hear the switch being depressed and sometimes I can miss it. I probably need a different height for the metal plate and to have it offset a little more. But it does restore the OEM look of having nothing on the shifter.
 

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I saw on a Tacoma forum that a guy built a custom shift knob from a computer joystick. I'm certain theres a way to run wiring up to the existing buttons on the joystick so you could have a high tech looking shift knob with buttons that actually do something other than look cool. As I start to learn more about the FAS and troubleshoot my calpod switch I might try to make said shift knob.
 

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I saw on a Tacoma forum that a guy built a custom shift knob from a computer joystick. I'm certain theres a way to run wiring up to the existing buttons on the joystick so you could have a high tech looking shift knob with buttons that actually do something other than look cool. As I start to learn more about the FAS and troubleshoot my calpod switch I might try to make said shift knob.
@*sean* on this website has a joystick for his shifter, I think he has wired the buttons up to some things.

I do want to mention, the method shown above, I had to reposition that mounting plate, but in its current location it has been FANTASTIC. I just hold the shifter a little further left than normal and the Auto-Stop kicks in. And it looks stock, it makes it like a special trick you can do.
 

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Awesome. So I finally got my calpod working. Turns out the LED in the first switch was drawing too much power. The new switch with no LED worked right out of the gate.

So admittedly a lot of this electrical stuff is lost on me. Does someone build and sell these? I'm just not confident enough in my ability to decipher the diagrams to build it correctly.
 

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tl;dr:
I want to ask if I use a relay to short ENGRDY on ECM A 2 to ECM A 32 do I risk frying anything? Should I maybe get +12V from the accessory socket? It's not too far away.

======= Background =======
Recently I did a redesign of the EFAS switch. I'm getting ready to test it out. But I gotta ask a question, because I don't want to fry my ECM somehow.

Normally when using EFAS, there's a good chance you have to tap the brake pedal for a fraction of a second, to get it to work. I want to get rid of that. So my thought was trick the ECM to think the brake has been pushed. I got the arduino programmed to switch another relay for 1/10th of a second to send the signal to the ECM. I also don't want to illuminate the brake lights. The diagram for Circuit 13 on page 15 of the electric troubleshooting manual shows that the brake pedal being pressed goes through C403 then gets split with one end heading to the ABS and the other heading to the ECM.

ECM Connector A Pin 32 is the wire that come from the brake pedal. I stuck a multimeter probe into the socket, and observed that when you press the brake pedal the pin reads 12 volts. It reads 0 between ECM A 32 and the car chassis when the brake pedal is not being pressed. ECM A 2 is ENGRDY and shows +12V when I've got the key turned to position 2.

If I use a relay to short ENGRDY on ECM A 2 to ECM A 32 do I risk frying anything? Should I maybe get +12V from the accessory socket? It's not too far away.
 

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Linsight Designer
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ECM:A32 is BKSW (brake switch)
-BKSW is always in one of two states:
--Directly connected to +12V (Hot at all times) via brake pedal switch, or;
--Pulled very hard to Chassis Ground (via rear brake light bulbs).
In short, BKSW is a low impedance source.

ECM:A02 is ENGRDY (engine ready)
-ENGRDY has an open drain inside the MCM. This means: the ECM can either:
--short ENGRDY to ground (low impedance), or;
--allow ENGRDY to float. Typically one of the 'listeners' - in this case either the HVAC control panel or the instrument panel - will have a pullup resistor that will softly pull this line high whenever the ECM isn't actively pulling it low.

After studying the above, you'll find that you should NOT short these wires together. Specifically, when BKSW is high (hard 12 volts) and ENGRDY is low (hard engine ground), then the MOSFET connected to ENGRDY (inside the ECM) will explode.

I haven't physically probed ENGRDY, but based on my understanding of the schematic I propose the following:

The ECM doesn't actually know the state on ENGRDY... the ECM itself is generating that signal. Conceptually, if you were to pull that line high or low (notwithstanding issue addressed above), the ECM wouldn't actually know you were doing so... inside, the microcontroller is just pulling a FET low whenever it wants to pull ENGRDY low. It's possible there's an ancillary "ENGRDY is disconnected" monitoring circuit that can detect the actual pin state, but if so I doubt the ECM is programmed to do anything beyond throwing an error when the observed pin state disagrees with the expected state.
 

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Okay, so normally when BKSW is normally high, there's a large current running to ground through the brake lights. If ENGRDY was connected to that and draining to ground at the same time, its MOSFET would be destroyed by a high current from the +12V into the MOSFET trying to get to the ground inside the ECM.

So to take BKSW high I need to use an alternative source, one which normally runs a high current, so that that source doesn't get fried?

But I am a little confused, as the BKSW +12V would never be high on its own when connected to another source via relay.

86427


I had the relay in series because I do NOT want the brake lights illuminated when I'm artificially pulling BKSW high.
 
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