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I really want to replace my own brake pads. They are starting to squeak and I think it should be within my abilities to do the job.

If anyone has done this, can you give me a walk through? Some tools I might need, etc....

I do my own oil changes, and installed my subwoofer :) I'm hoping that's credentials enough :)
http://www.dennisjudd.com/car.html
 

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Changing brake pads is easier than changing the oil. But I would suggest getting a service manual to follow along with.
 

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Resist said:
But I would suggest getting a service manual to follow along with.
A service manual would also help taking off an EGR valve...but I didn't make people get one, I took pics to help out :) (posted here and on my site)

If I can do my own brake pads, then I plan on doing the same...making a graphical walk through for others to follow.....pretty pictures always help :)
 

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All I was saying is it's easier to use a service manual than explain how to replace brakes. While as I said, it's not complicated but there is a steps you must follow and a service manual makes it much easier.
 

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1. Jack up the front end. Use the parking brake.
2. Remove the wheels.
3. Remove the two bolts holding the caliper assemblies. If you don't know what the calipers are - Put the wheels back on, proceed to step 11.
4. Squeeze the inboard pad back to its fully retracted position. A C-clamp works well enough.
5. Remove the brake pads. They'll just flip out of the calipers.
6. Cover the rear of the new pads with anti-squeal compound.
7. Insert new pads into calipers. Inboard and outboard pads are usually different, take a look at the old ones for reference.
8. Slide calipers over the brake rotors.
9. Reinstall bolts holding calipers.
10. Put the wheels back on.
11. Lower the vehicle.

Now, This is absolutely quick and dirty. Yes it's the way I usually do it. You should also check the brake rotors for thickness, grooves or other damage. Use appropriate torques on the caliper bolts. And consult the tech manual, but I figured this is what you were actually interested in.

Brake pads are easy, the hardest parts are actually getting the caliper bolts off, because they can sometimes have a heluva torque. And squeezing the calipers open, because a c-clamp is not the best tool for this (but it will work).
 

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Couple more details---

Just a couple add-ons to above---

1. Jack up the front end. Use the parking brake. (Chock or block the wheels. Use jack stands to support the car. They can be borrowed. Too much safety is always a good thing. )

3. Remove the two bolts holding the caliper assemblies. (If they're really stuck good with Mother Natures Locktite {rust and corrosion} you'll need a 'breaker bar'. It's a really big, long handle that gives you enough torque to get them loose without injuring yourself)

4. Squeeze the inboard pad back to its fully retracted position ( Turn the calpier assy. outward until you can sort of face it. You can carefully, gently use a flat screwdriver to spread the inner pad away from the rotor. DON'T gouge the rotor surface! As you do this, as required, you'll be displacing brake fluid back up into the master cyclinder. Surround the master cylinder with rags to catch what fluid may overflow or squirt out of the top. Nasty stuff on painted surfaces!! :evil: )

6. Cover the rear of the new pads with anti-squeal compound. (Usually included in the brake pad package. Not too much, just a nice even thin layer.)

7. Insert new pads into calipers. Inboard and outboard pads are usually different (The 'wear indicator' is the inboard pad,fits with the little metal thing on the Top of the pad, as installed. The other, with all the weird spirngs and clips is the outboard pad. Sometimes all those shims that are included are going to cause some drag on the pads and calipers. You might not need all of them.)

9. Reinstall bolts holding calipers. (Put a light film of grease on the caliper bolts, just to help them stay free to slide the caliper assembly back and forth as the brakes are used, and to keep Mother Natures Locktite down for the future. The large top bolts are torqued to 23 ft.lb. The smaller bottom bolts are done at 16 ft. lb. Don't have a torque wrench? :shock: You can sometimes get a loaner from your favorite parts store. :) )

10. Put the wheels back on. ( Lug nuts torque to 80 ft. lb. )

11. Lower the vehicle. (Pump the brake pedal till you have a firm responce BEFORE YOU TRY TO MOVE THE CAR! :!: It's Such a nasty surprise you give yourself, when you try to keep from running slap into something with NO brakes until you franticly pump the pedal as you coast ever closer to ----wife's car - lawn tractor - oak tree - just whatever! :) ) If you do this to yourself, try to remember the 'emergency' brake, as this would qualify for that! :wink:
 

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Dennis -

Good job. One question, though. Did you know that the rotors were okay? I wouldn't mind tackling the pad job, but my rotors are a little worn and warped, and need turning. TIA - Pat
 

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tubesguy said:
my rotors are a little worn and warped, and need turning. TIA - Pat
It's better to replace worn/warped rotors instead of turning them (machining them). The difference in thickness between new rotors and worn rotors that require replacement is only 2 mm :!:
New rotors are 17mm thick and the wear limit is 15mm.
It's not worth turning rotors because they will warp much more easily and therefore require replacement 6 months later which is a waste of time labour and money.

The front rotors of the Insight are exactly the same as 1984-1987 Honda CRX front rotors so there are lots of aftermarket options.
I use Brembo blank rotors that cost me less then buying Honda OEM rotors (PM me for details).
 

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I just changed my pads and rotors a few days ago on my 2000 insight with 156000 miles. I got every thing from the local auto parts store. The rotors where aftermarket, made in china, about $16.00 each.

The hardest part was getting the two little screws out that hold the rotor to the hub. I had to use a hammer and chisel to get them to start turning.
 

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A vehicle's braking system is one of the most critical parts of the entire mechanism. If you are planning to replace brakes of your car then it is important to know that only the brake pad requires regular attention. This is because when you hit the car brakes then these pads are the ones that take majority of the friction and heat gets generated from the tires.

Here's how to replace the brake pads:

How to Replace Brake Pads | AutoMD
Now that you have resurrected it, you realize this is a 5 year old thread? I suspect those pads have been changed by now..:D
Regards,
Jerry
 
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