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Hello,

I’m new to the forum, I’ve been lurking a bit but this is my first post. I just ordered new spark plugs for my car and I’m still in the process of getting a service manual. I know that I need the B plugs for my car and that I need to Torque them to 17 lb-ft but is there anything else I need to do such as gaping the plugs ect.

Thanks for any advice
 

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Hi Zircrose and welcome to the forum :!: :)

Checking the gap it always a prerequisite, but if the end protector is still on the plug its _extremely_ rare to find one out of spec nowadays.

A drop of light oil on the threads before installation is always a good idea too :!: WD40 has never let me down for this purpose. ;)

HTH! :)
 

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Honda will tell you not to, but I always use anti-seize on the plugs. A light coating is enough, don't glob it on. Make sure it is sensor safe or it will kill your O2 sensors eventually. Also, dielectric grease on the ceramic insulator and top connection will prevent the boot from getting stuck in the future.
 

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Sharp eyes there gobuchul74 (p.g. 4-8, step 6) and good advice about assuring its O2 sensor safe Aaron Cake.

:D

And while the manual does suggest an anti seize the specific type will be critical for O2 sensor life and removal without cylinder head damage @210K miles. I've seen many Hondas will conventional spark plugs ment only to be in service for 30K neglected to 100K. Removal at this point can be a bit dicey. And this is below the Insight's "normal" replacement interval :!: :shock: Its _normal_ for carbon to creep up the spark plug threads. Choose the wrong anti seize compound and your likely to make this problem worse (should the anti seize add to the "gunkiness" over th 105K replacement interval.)

The 3 formulas I am familar with do well in other loactions and for shorter durations. Copper, Nickle or Molibdum (Moly) based compounds. But its a possible chemical reaction and the extreme heat in the spark plug's location that concerns me.

Nor do I "know" if _any_ of these are considered O2 sensor "safe". My understanding would be that should a suffient quantity reach the senor damage will ocurr with _any_ of these. Its just that with proper use and for this purpose this would not be expected to happen.

Anybody have some good experience that they can clairify this with :?:
 

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So, has anyone found an O2 friendly antisieze? Also, I've never used a dielectric grease, but I have had boots stick, so do I just go to Autozone and say I want dielectric grease?
Thanks
robert
 

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Don't think any of them are "friendly" Bob.

It's just that with proper application the likelyhood of this substance traveling down the exhaust stream is tiny.

FIY Nippon Denso O2 sensors come with a copper based anti sieze. And AFAI remember OEM Honda's come with nickel based.

HTH! :)
 

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Hmmm,

Except for the specification:

"Rated from -650F (-540C) to 24000F (13160C)."

It should do more than you could ever hope for :!: :p

24,000 F :!: :?: :? Hotter than H*** :twisted:
C'mon the sun's surface temp is only 6000C (10382 F)

(They didn't even do the C :arrow: F conversion correctly)
 

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Is that crazy temp rating possibly becuase it was developed for use in jet engines? But even then 2x the surface of the sun? Jeez :shock:
 
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