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Sometimes, I feel a "clunking" coming from the shifter when shifting first to second. It feels like something is rotating, and is hitting something inside the transmission is my guess. Is this second gear synco starting to fail? I am not double clutching, though can shift after the clunking subsides. The clunking only lasts a second, if that. No other strange noises coming from the transmission. No clunking in any other gears as well.

Another thing, I sometimes feel a very rough feeling when shifting into second, it makes a noise as if I was shifting into the gear without hitting the clutch. Whats the red flags? is my transmission about to blow?
 

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Sometimes, I feel a "clunking" coming from the shifter when shifting first to second. It feels like something is rotating, and is hitting something inside the transmission is my guess. Is this second gear synco starting to fail? I am not double clutching, though can shift after the clunking subsides. The clunking only lasts a second, if that. No other strange noises coming from the transmission. No clunking in any other gears as well.

Another thing, I sometimes feel a very rough feeling when shifting into second, it makes a noise as if I was shifting into the gear without hitting the clutch. Whats the red flags? is my transmission about to blow?
I recommend you give the rear motor mount, which is actually mounted to the transmission, a good look over. Look to see if the rubber parts are cracked or broken.
 

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As someone else mentioned, go slow with the shift. If you practice, you can find a technique - primarily time and pressure - which will give you shifts like butter. For the first to second, I run engine up to about 4000 RPM, clutch and fairly quickly put slight pressure on second. As the speed of the gears reach about same relative speed, the synchronizer load is small and it should slip smoothly into second. Technique and practice are important when dealing with the OEM transmission and the double synchro system. It wasn't designed for speed shifting or heavy handed shifting:)
 

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As someone else mentioned, go slow with the shift. If you practice, you can find a technique - primarily time and pressure - which will give you shifts like butter. For the first to second, I run engine up to about 4000 RPM, clutch and fairly quickly put slight pressure on second. As the speed of the gears reach about same relative speed, the synchronizer load is small and it should slip smoothly into second. Technique and practice are important when dealing with the OEM transmission and the double synchro system. It wasn't designed for speed shifting or heavy handed shifting:)
That's definitely why I'm shifting so "fast," I only run first to about 15MPH and then to second. I got this as my first car, and first ever stick with absolutely no training other than time and some friends. Learning as I go. Do you have any other tips lol?
 

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It is my guess that if you only run up to 15 MPH in first, then the "mesh" speeds of gears are are already slipping away by time you can get to second. Particularly in Madison in the winter time when the transmission fluid would be colder. If you give the car just a little time to warm up, thing will also go smoother. If the car is just slightly warm, you have nothing to fear with 3500-4000RPM. It is mostly timing and technique, even with weak synchronizers, but weak synchros are exacerbated by cold weather.:)
 

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I recommend you give the rear motor mount, which is actually mounted to the transmission, a good look over. Look to see if the rubber parts are cracked or broken.
It is my guess that if you only run up to 15 MPH in first, then the "mesh" speeds of gears are are already slipping away by time you can get to second. Particularly in Madison in the winter time when the transmission fluid would be colder. If you give the car just a little time to warm up, thing will also go smoother. If the car is just slightly warm, you have nothing to fear with 3500-4000RPM. It is mostly timing and technique, even with weak synchronizers, but weak synchros are exacerbated by cold weather.:)
I read you should only let the car warm up for about a minute, and start driving though keeping RPM below 3000 until you reach operating temp. Reason being, I understand that the engine emits alot of nitrous oxide which in turn destroyed the catalytic converter. This is the procedure I'm following at 20 degree temps.

How long do you think I should idle?
 

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None. Not necessary. Drive off easily until it warms up some. If the engine is running and it isn't moving you're wasting gas and messing up your MPG.

Sam
 
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I'm thinking of babying the gearbox, not saving a bit of gas. A minute's worth of idling isn't going to cost much -certainly cheap compared to transmissions. I only warm the car a minute or so when it is very cold. But honestly my gearbox techniques are more intuitive than scientific. To each his own.:)
 

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Ahahaha "4000 rpm." The only time my engine went that fast is when my friend caught one of his clod-hopper size 14 shoes and held the gas pedal to the floor with the box in neutral.

The redline shutoff system works, just like in the movies: "Braap...braap...braap..."
 

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I'm thinking of babying the gearbox, not saving a bit of gas. A minute's worth of idling isn't going to cost much -certainly cheap compared to transmissions. I only warm the car a minute or so when it is very cold. But honestly my gearbox techniques are more intuitive than scientific. To each his own.:)
Personally, I'd rather spend a bit of MPG on transmission health.
 

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Just a comment from somebody who's taught lots of people to drive stick... People tend to be in a huge hurry to get from one gear to another, like the momentum will evaporate in a split-second. There are times when you have to (or want to) row quickly, but for many there's no reason to rush from gear to gear. Even and gentle clutch-and-shifting increases mileage, reduces wear, and makes the ride far nicer for passengers. I always tell the people to pretend they're "petting a cat" when they shift.
 

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Just a comment from somebody who's taught lots of people to drive stick... People tend to be in a huge hurry to get from one gear to another, like the momentum will evaporate in a split-second. There are times when you have to (or want to) row quickly, but for many there's no reason to rush from gear to gear. Even and gentle clutch-and-shifting increases mileage, reduces wear, and makes the ride far nicer for passengers. I always tell the people to pretend they're "petting a cat" when they shift.
Lol Ive been told by a friend who, respectively likes to drive very fast that I shift like a grandma. Matter a fact, that's when the clunking started happening around that time. Honestly, I dont know anyone who drives stick other than him, and I don't have any other reference points other than the web. Maybe I am shifting slow :/ but whatever, 95 percent of the time I don't have cars backed up behind me, and that seems fine by me. I also drive without the IMA battery, at 60 horsepower, don't expect to much acceleration anyways.
 

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Some transmissions are a lot stronger with better synchronizers than others. The Insight double synchronizers are particularly weak IMO. The little brass tabs are soft and too narrow. Seems to me they would have been more durable had Honda made the tabs thicker.
 

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Lol Ive been told by a friend who, respectively likes to drive very fast that I shift like a grandma.
Drive the way you think you should! There's lots of guys on this forum that grew up driving "standards" in underpowered vehicles. I'd be interested in their opnions. My dad and mom (b 1915 and 1922) could drive stick so smoothly that it felt like a modern CVT. That's who I try to emulate. Sure, I can pound thru the gears, double-clutching, downshifting thru the curves, and all that crap, but why bother? And with a equipment that's 20+ years old, slamming stuff around can't be good.
 

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Never downshift an Insight unless you really need to. Certainly don't downshift coming to stops. When making corners double clutch your downshift after the corner. No need to hurry the weak transmission.

I'd venture most original owners of the old cars downshifted twice as much as needed for gentle driving, and that is the problem with much of the fleet;)
 
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