Honda Insight Forum banner

1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,389 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
It was 13 degrees tonight and after a 40 mile highway trip, and just after driving into my garage, I felt the rear wheel bearings they were still ice cold, even after the 40highway miles. Grease can get pretty stiff when it is cold, I was wondering if we should be aiming some hot exhaust at them to warm up the grease. :twisted:
Or maybe we need to repack them in winter with a thinner grease?
Crazy idea????
:wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
Michael, this is your mother speaking: get back to coding that MIMA ramp!
Engineers! :roll:
:twisted: How do you drive an engineer completely insane?
Tie him to a chair, stand in front of him, and fold up a road map the wrong way.
JoeS., yeah, one of them
Oh, back onto the topic of wheel grease: umm, never ever repacked those rear wheel bearings on my 1967 Saab and the wheels still spin... I think the only time I'll touch my Insight's rear wheels is to install an electric drive hub... FWIW, I didn't think Mike's idea was THAT crazy. :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,032 Posts
I've been wondering about this, too. At low speeds the rolling friction is what matters, and there's not much you can do to change it. Tires and tire pressures, wheel bearings, transmission oil, and engine oil are about all there is to think about. After you've pumped your tires up to the limit, then what?

Perhaps the thing to do is get some really skinny snow tires, like the rally racers do. They run these http://www.pirellicompetizioni.com/en_4 ... snow.jhtml 135 width tires on big 4wd rally cars with hundreds of horsepower. In any sort of snow it seems like narrower would be better for both traction and rolling resistance.

Why isn't there a low rolling resistance snow tire for hybrids? In fact, why aren't tire companies coming out with competitors to the RE92 for the Prius and HCH cars?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,942 Posts
If Mike had found there to be any detectable "warmth" in the wheel bearing area that would be a problem :!: ;)

Heat=friction=energy conversion=loss of MPG=metal expansion=tighter tolerances=more friction...

Mike needs to take a break from the coding, he's getting cross-eyed resulting in backwards thinking. :p
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,332 Posts
I had a dragging caliper on my CRX. The friction increased as the temperature went up. I noticed it because of the smell. The left front mag got so hot you couldn't touch it! Thought it was a wheel bearing but was in the middle of the bush. Eventually there was a lot of noise coming from the wheel and I limped into a garage. The mechanic charged me 65 dollars to tighten the wheel nuts. :shock: (The bearing was fine)

Moral of story. Check your nuts if you smell something burning! :wink:

Back to the topic, I do notice I don't coast as far in the cold weather. There is probably a combination of factors, tires, wheels, wind, transmission, CV joints, shocks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
I'm not sure a tire company could design a LLR snow tire due to the need for a more aggressive tread pattern. It would be nice though if another manufacturer offered an all season LLR tire in 165/65-14 just to give us Insight owners some choices.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,389 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
John
Where is that cross eyed Emoticon when you need it?

What made me consider this a potential problem was my metal lathe. When I start it up in the cold garage, it takes a few minutes of running at mid speed before the headstock grease gets warm enough to go the higher speeds. Not too far a stretch to go from a Lathe bearing to a car wheel bearing, should work the same way.?

I spun the rear wheel, can't vouch for the CV joints, which are larger diameter, and are right in the power train? Not sure what the best way to check the front wheels would be.
Neutral up on jacks, with a torque wrench to turn it?

:wink:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,942 Posts
Mike Dabrowski 2000 said:
John
Where is that cross eyed Emoticon when you need it?

<snip>
Wanted one too (for my reply) :p

Wasn't an unreasonable deduction. Just with your electronic wizardy skills I expected a bit more from you in regard to such a basic friction observation. ;)

And beside their sealed bearings, very difficult to "repack" (undeeded) without damage to the seals. The tires would reasonably appear to be a much bigger part of the "cold" equation (as far as rolling friction).

HTH! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,032 Posts
I totally don't thinks it's a brain what-you-said! Wheel bearing drag is one of the three or four components of mechanical drag, and surely the bearings have more friction when they're cold. And they shouldn't be expected to warm up as a result of driving, as mentioned above.

Solution: Warm them up with electricity. What's needed is a source for, ideally, a small electric blanket or heater wire like what's used for keeping pipes from freezing, but that runs on 12 volts. Ideas?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,389 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Based on how free the rear wheel was able to spin, with 15 degree temperature, I would not expect any measurable increase in rolling resistance for the back wheels contribution, but the test with one front wheel jacked up, with a cold verses hot condition in neutral would be considering the CV joints grease, and all transaxle components, and could be a more substantial difference. I don't have to go out for a long ride till next week, anyone in the northlands that wants to do a cold,vs hot front drive test, should be able to answer this question once and for all. :wink:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,009 Posts
On a more serious note, I have been experimenting with one of those under the desk foot heater pads for a IMA battery warmer for overnight in the garage. They are reasonably priced, don't get too hot, should be available at the office supply. Not 12v but you get the picture. Might ask at the travel trailer/motor home place about something like this. There might be a 12v something out there for keeping the ([email protected]#^&%$pper) tank thawed. :oops:
Randall

edit: thawed(read from freezing)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,942 Posts
Mike Dabrowski 2000 said:
We are all intitiled to a brain fart ocassionally right! :oops: :wink:
Been there, done that and in here too :!: ;)
(didn't mean to sound overly critical)

Dougie:

You've gotta keep the energy expended to warm the bearings below whats expected to be "recovered" from decreased rolling resistance. Hmmm. An interesting college physics experiment. And I suspect a very difficult engineering project. A well chosen grease is probably the solution.

Sincerely,
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
Top