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Discussion Starter #1
....question of costums in the Netherlands....

How many km's can you drive ONLY on the battery of the Insight, if the engine is not working, the requirement here is at least 24 km town traffic on battery only!!
Is there anybody who has experience about this ?

Greetings etienne van leeuwen
 

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Thats not the way the Insight works. There is no battery only mode, when the car is moving under it's own power the engine is on.
 

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I read a post that the Insight will creep along for a short distance after the gas is gone, but since you would be cranking over the gasoline engine to do this it is really bad practice. I would only do this in a life threatening emergency. Similarly any car can be moved using just the starter motor, but you risk burning it out.
 

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windmill said:
How many km's can you drive ONLY on the battery of the Insight, if the engine is not working
Answer: 0, zero, zip, nada, null, nothing, not at all

As Rick pointed out, there is no "battery only" operation of the Insight. The car will not move, the electric motor will not receive power, if you can't start the gas engine, first.

But, as b1shmu63 said, you can "limp on fumes" for a few km, since the electric assist will propell the car, even when there is no gas. This only works if you are moving when gas runs out and keep it mooving by flooring the gas pedal immediately. If the engine stalls first, there is no way to re-start it.

But driving on fumes, just like in any car, is a VERY BAD THING for the car. The engine, and especially catalytic converters suffer greatly from uncontrolled combustion, explosions, excessive exhaust gas temperatures, etc.

When the "low fuel" warning comes on, you have plenty time to find a gas station anywhere in the civilized world. So don't chance it!
 

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Insight will go about 2KM on the batteries at 30KM/H if you run out of gas. The key is that the engine must run for a second or two to get moving.

Why Honda didn't put the motor on the input shaft of the transmission is beyond me...
 

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Aaron Cake said:
Why Honda didn't put the motor on the input shaft of the transmission is beyond me...
...because it's the active flywheel! If it was on the other side of the clutch, you'd have one noisy 3-banger! Or you would need an extra (passive=heavy) flywheel. Or a second (expensive) active flywheel.

Toyota basically did this in the Prius, but that's a whole other animal.
 

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There has been a lot of discussion of the Honda hybrid vs the Toyota hybrid. They work differently and have certain advantages and disadvanges.

The Toyota hybrid (Prius) is a complete hybrid as it can go electric-only, but the batteries don't allow it to go far in this mode. Still, it performs better in urban stop-and-go traffic then the Honda hybrids. The drawbacks are it's heavier and can't use a manual transmission.

Honda hybrids (Insight, Civic) never drive electric-only. The electric assist is intended only for acceleration, hill-climbing, and starting from a complete stop. You might think of it as an "electric turbocharger" joined at the hip. Honda hybrids perform better cruising than would a Toyota-type hybrid. The Honda design is lighter in part because it needs less batteries. If your read the knowledge base, both gas and electric components are working together as the electric motor is the flywheel. The gas engine would not work well if the electric motor failed.
 

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Hi windmill,
Glad Jul.

I think of the Honda Integrated Motor Assist (IMA) system as an electric turbo. As in it's name, IMA, the electric motor only assists the engine. It cannot function on its own. When people ask me about the engine I just say; "The gas engine is on all of the time , except when stopped, and the electric motor acts like a turbo boost to help out when accelerating or going up hills." Then they get a glint in their eye and say; "Oh, that makes sense, I bet it has some zip to it." :lol:

I think the system should be called the Electric Turbo Assist (ETA) :wink:
 

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It is my understanding that modern 4 cylinder engines use counter rotating weights to minimize vibration. Although they are remarkably effective, they add complexity and weight and decrease efficiency slightly. The Insight does not require them.
 

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...because it's the active flywheel! If it was on the other side of the clutch, you'd have one noisy 3-banger! Or you would need an extra (passive=heavy) flywheel. Or a second (expensive) active flywheel.
So build a V-Twin and use a larger electric motor. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #11
This is one of the 1001 silly quistions wich will be asked, and there are many more in the near future!, because next week I am getting my "armadillo'' (or how is that never in a bilion year changed called ant-eater?) My country makes it verry hard to import a vehicle CAN'WAIT !!! 8) 8)

Greetings etienne
 
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