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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I took one of the cam position sensors out and looked at it. Not much to see. Checked the connectors for both and they are clean inside. Since there are two I tried starting it with one unplugged, then the other. Same behavior. Also tried both unplugged; no change.
Does anyone know the theory of operation here? Do both sensors need to be functioning or are they redundant. Is spark timing decided by crank or cam position sensors?
Since I know I have spark, my best working theory for why the car won't run on ether is that the spark must be occurring at the wrong time.
Might go buy a multimeter to check the sensors.
 

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Now is the time for you to include your Location in your Profile. Maybe there is an Insighter close by that can assist.
How did you determine there was fuel in the line? Which Line?
Loosen the banjo fitting on the fuel rail to the cylinders and crank it a for a few seconds. results?
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Now is the time for you to include your Location in your Profile. Maybe there is an Insighter close by that can assist.
How did you determine there was fuel in the line? Which Line?
Loosen the banjo fitting on the fuel rail to the cylinders and crank it a for a few seconds. results?
I'm in St. Louis, MO. I didn't check the fuel very thoroughly, I think I am going to get a fuel pressure gwage tomorrow. I'll also buy a multimeter and start checking sensors.
 

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To check the fuel pressure as Willie says, at the banjo fitting: This is the place the fuel line connects on the right front corner of the cylinder head. It requires a 17mm tool to loosen the banjo bolt. If you crank the ignition for a few seconds it should build fuel pressure. If you then go loosen the bolt and if fuel sprays out of the fitting, there is a pretty good amount of pressure being pumped from the fuel pump. If there is no spray and just a drip, I would suspect a problem with the fuel pump or wiring to it. This is only a simple test. Sometimes finding the proper fuel pressure gauge adapter can be a challenge.
If you remove the banjo bolt, be careful not to drop the washers, there are 2 of them, one on each side of the fitting.
If you have fuel (spray) pressure. I would then want to check to see if I had pulse at the fuel injector electrical plugs.

Have you gone through both fuse boxes and used a test light to be sure you don’t have a blown fuse to something?

Scott
 
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Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
To check the fuel pressure as Willie says, at the banjo fitting: This is the place the fuel line connects on the right front corner of the cylinder head. It requires a 17mm tool to loosen the banjo bolt. If you crank the ignition for a few seconds it should build fuel pressure. If you then go loosen the bolt and if fuel sprays out of the fitting, there is a pretty good amount of pressure being pumped from the fuel pump. If there is no spray and just a drip, I would suspect a problem with the fuel pump or wiring to it. This is only a simple test. Sometimes finding the proper fuel pressure gauge adapter can be a challenge.
If you remove the banjo bolt, be careful not to drop the washers, there are 2 of them, one on each side of the fitting.
If you have fuel (spray) pressure. I would then want to check to see if I had pulse at the fuel injector electrical plugs.

Have you gone through both fuse boxes and used a test light to be sure you don’t have a blown fuse to something?

Scott
I just did this, and something very interesting happened. I had someone cranking it while I loosened the banjo bolt, and the car started! I had done it once and fuel sprayed out but nothing happened. We did it again so I could take a video and the car coughed to life and started running real rough.

Here is the video:

Is the fuel pressure too high, flooding the engine? If so how do I tune it down and what could have caused it. I always got 45-50mpg doing 80 on the highway so I would be surprised if its been dumping too much fuel.

Edit: I just put the valve cover on and started it up like normal. It idled for five minutes before I turned it off. The valves clicked at first I guess before they got oil but then quieted down. Should I try and get a fuel pressure gauge and see if its too high? What else can I check on the fuel system?
 

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Think it was a fuel issue that i suspected first time. I would change the fuel filter and fire it up and go for a local test drive. Clean those factory plugs with wire brush and put back in.Check to see if they are all b plugs or a plugs. There a mark stamp indicating the right plug that fits your car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Think it was a fuel issue that i suspected first time. I would change the fuel filter and fire it up and go for a local test drive. Clean those factory plugs with wire brush and put back in.Check to see if they are all b plugs or a plugs. There a mark stamp indicating the right plug that fits your car.
I just drove it around the block, it seems to be working as normal. Starts right up. It looks like I have to drop the tank to get to the fuel filter, is that right? What kind of fuel filter should I get? All the auto parts stores seem to suggest generic ones.
 

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Access to the Fuel Pump is right behind the seats. It can be accessed from inside the vehicle. Search and you will find a thread about the replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Access to the Fuel Pump is right behind the seats. It can be accessed from inside the vehicle. Search and you will find a thread about the replacement.
I see where I can get to the gas tank behind the seat but looking through old threads I'm seeing a filter component that I can't find from automotive supply stores. When I search for "2000 Honda Insight fuel filter" all the result are for "universal fit" fuel filters, the type that splice into soft line. Is there a site that sells the actual filter?
I could take the assembly out of the tank and look at the filters but that seems like a lot of work and a low probability of reward.
 

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Another possibility just occurred to me. Do you suppose you might have excess moisture condensation in your tank?

That problem can sometimes be intermittent. You might try some dry gas.
 

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I see where I can get to the gas tank behind the seat but looking through old threads I'm seeing a filter component that I can't find from automotive supply stores. When I search for "2000 Honda Insight fuel filter" all the result are for "universal fit" fuel filters, the type that splice into soft line. Is there a site that sells the actual filter?
I could take the assembly out of the tank and look at the filters but that seems like a lot of work and a low probability of reward.
Don't do anything with your fuel filter. It is not designed to be serviced except when the fuel pump is replaced. Your engine was flooded and I was going to suggest giving it a couple of pumps of engine oil from an oil can to restore the compression loss from gasoline flooding down the cylinder walls. You probably should change the oil, and I think you will be just fine. It is a Honda trademark to flood out from time to time, especially after sitting. I wouldn't give it any more time than you already have. Change the oil and be on your way.
 

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Next time you run across the issue, fully depress the accelerator when starting. If you have flooded the engine, this increases combustion air and just might help counteract the flooding, if that is the problem.
 

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Just one more suggestion, since it appears that the engine was probably flooded, you might have the fuel injectors cleaned. If the spray pattern is bad, that "might" lead to flooding. Never sure on that kind of stuff;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Hey sorry for the delay but I wanted to give an update to close this thread up and say that the car has been running just peachy since it started. It very much sounds like the engine was flooded (and it stayed flooded for three days :unsure:). I changed my oil and also pulled the battery out of the car completely since I had everything torn up in anticipation of taking out the fuel pump. I still need to clean up the old spark plugs and put those back in but other than that she's back to normal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Hello,

Just an update on this old thread for posterity. I just had this problem again, just a few weeks short of a year later. Car wouldn't start yesterday evening. Cranked and coughed but wouldn't catch and start. At first I tried the trick that fixed it last time, "bleeding" the fuel rail by opening the banjo bolt as someone cranked the car. It didn't help.
I pulled the spark plugs and they were glistening wet (after several minutes worth of cranking, mind) and seemed to have some carbon build up. Those were the cheap autozone plugs in the car since the last time I had this issue. I took the opportunity to clean off the OEM iridium ones and put them back in the car.
That didn't help either so I pulled off the fuel rail and tested the ejectors with a 9V battery. The spray on all 3 seemed fine.
After I did that I put it back together and cranked the car. At first it didn't start but after a few tried the car coughed to life and started to idle rough for a few seconds, then smooth out. I drove it around the block and now its back to working like normal.

Still unsure what the actual problem is.
 
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