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Discussion Starter #1
In a previous post I hypothisized that using cruiise on my trips was giving my CVT good mileage. Forum members seemed skeptical and they are correct.

I have averaged over 74MPG over the last 400 miles, no cruise control. It just takes patience.

For those CVT skeptics (Resist buddy.. thats you) I can post pictures of my FE display.

-Jon
 

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WOW! Very nice in a CVT

74 MPG in a CVT! That's awesome. What's your secret? Do you accelerate with the minimum (if any) assist and stay below 55 mph? Do tell!

-s
 

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jnewell said:
In a previous post I hypothisized that using cruiise on my trips was giving my CVT good mileage.
Not sure how you concluded cruise control would adjust correctly for best fuel mileage. They just aren't smart enough yet.
 

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Please give details on CVT mpg like that, because Bluebelle is a CVT and wants to know.

We finally junked the funky Sonar tires to get her back to being a real Insight (OEMs now), but she's not giving us the 70s like that yet.

Anything special you are doing?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Beginers Luck?



Please give details on CVT mpg like that, because Bluebelle is a CVT and wants to know.
I am a newbie having purchased my 2001 CVT in late August. Obviously I am also new at the Hypermileage game. I think several factors play into the mileage that I have been getting in the CVT:

#1 reason is absolutely the characteristics of my commute:

I have a mostly downhill commute to the freeway(4 miles). Then I have 55 miles of pure freeway driving. The freeway is 3 lanes each way and I leave at 5:30-6:00am in the morning so that I wont piss off anyone by driving so slow (50MPH-55MPH). The freeway is basically flat. I dont hit any traffic cause I leave early. There are no red lights and the one road change I make now has an express EZ-pass (IE there is not one single red light on my commute to work). I exit off of the freeway and can practically coast to my parking spot at work. Its a dream commute for a hypermilage driver (If I can call myself that driving a CVT)

#2 Pump up the tires to 45 and check them twice a week.

#3 Drive by instantaneous FE and try to ignore your speed. This seems to induce a mini pulse/glide pattern as you traverse 'low-frequencey' hills. (The only type I encouter) I'll let the FE max out while my speed decreases when first entering the upill gradient(I dont adjust throttle for the hill). When I reach what I have deemed the lowest acceptable speed, I gently feather the gas until I can maintain that new low minimum speed (for examples sake lets say thats 47MPH) as I go up the hill. At the crest of the hill I'll let off the gas, and still maintian that lower minimum speed but my FE will shoot way up. As I continue down the hill I slowly accelerate back to my prehill speed without changing throttle position(FE stays high). Also, the smallest amount of throttle must be applied when going back down the hill to prevent charging from dragging you down and making it impossible to reach pre-hill speeds without changing throttle position (and thus decreasing FE). Sounds wierd but keep your foot on the gas (the minimum possible to prevent charging).

Did that make any sense :?:

Peace
-Jon
 

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Re: Beginers Luck?

No beginners luck there :!: Just diligent hyper MPG driving :!: (and a very fortunate commute route :) )

Simply stated what your doing is rollercoastering the hills.

And in the _Hyper_ MPG style. Takes cooperative traffic to allow this. In my 5 spd. I've managed to make my afternoon commute home holding 99.4 MPG (my new record :!:) Takes _perfect_ weather (maybe a bit of a tailwind ;) ) and heavy enough traffic (in just the right places) to slow us all down to the 40-45 MPH range, else traffic won't tolerate my rollercoastering and I have to speed-up to the 50-55 MPH range and MPG's drop to the low 80's. The 5 spd's maximum MPG range _appears_ to be in the low 40 MPH range.

Before it gets too cold I'd bet you could achieve an ultimate at or near 80 MPG if you'd try 5+- MPH slower, pumped the tires to 50 psi, added the cardboard radiator block and hot air intake.

The _FIRST_ CVT in the 80 MPG "club" :?: :!: :!:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hot air mod

Does the 'Hot Air' mod increase maximum attainable FE or just prevent poor milage in the winter months?

Peace
-Jon
 

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I've been thinking about CVTs lately and was wondering how aggressively drivers use the available control options. For example, in my five speed I use second or third gear quite a bit when going up hills, in order to avoid using the IMA. Is this similar to using L? Do people shift into L on a regular basis?

And I stir the gearbox between third, fourth and fifth quite a bit at low speeds, trying to stay in fifth as much as possible. Isn't this comparable to using S mode? Do you shift between S and [I forget the other] modes often?

Just wondering whether the potential of the CVT version has been explored as completely as the five speed...
 

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CVT Techniques

Pardon my ignorance, but what happens when driving a CVT if you're going down a hill and put the transmission into neutral and turn off the ignition key? Does it hurt the transmission at all? JoeS. (Never owned an automatic nor a CVT) :?
 

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I'll try to anwer both questions above in reverse order.

I think putting the CVT in neutral for a very short time is safe but
not at high speed. For example, you should not tow the Insight CVT
with the front wheels on the ground. I imagine some type of damage
will result and I wouldn't want to try it.

I think most CVT would not use (or perhaps never have used) the
Low gear? (locked ratio? since it is not really a gear!) (L position).
That would be like driving in 1rst gear only on the MT version.

The (S position) (Sport or Second depending on documentation) is used
sometimes but for fun only (not often)...It may help mileage on very
steep hills but the IMA will still come on then. I guess Honda did imagine
that some people will use this often since they put S and D buttons on
the steering wheel for our ease of use. Mostly I just keep it in (D) normal
drive and let the CVT do the ratio thinking for me while I help it determine
the ratio with the use of the gas pedal.

JoeCVT - Just your average CVT owner
 

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Since you're not to tow the CVT with the wheels on the ground, because the transmission lubrication is driven from the engine side, I would think that shifting into N and coasting would be a bad idea.

Re the use of L, the reason I ask is because the instruction manual specifically calls it out for use "on hills." The CVT doesn't have a special low gear mechanism, it's all done by the pulleys and belt, so it seems to me that perhaps part of the CVT driving method should include aggressive use of L--just like the 5-speed users make aggressive use of 2 and 3.

There are really three programs on the CVT: L, S, and D, and that hypermileage technique would make use of all three... Just trying to encourage experimentation... :D
 

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You, jnewell, are a Master. An Insight Sensei. 74 MPG is awesome!

Cruise will definitely NOT get you the highest mileage possible. It's only a convenience, allowing the driver to trade a few MPG for the luxury of not having to constantly watch the display for optimum driving. For instance, when I'm on the highway not using cruise, but I'm on the cell (yes, business, dammit), my mileage falls below "my" normal. So, for me, cruise is a nice compromise, and under those conditions, works well as a fuel-saver.

You have proven that given the right conditions, with attentive driving, CVTs can approach the MTs' potential. I envy your conditions, and your dedication! :wink:
 
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