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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a gray (grey?) 2000 Insight 250K miles. Reputedly the very first one in Austin. It's my favorite car - ever. Lately, I've been studying the forum to extend its life.

My windshield again needs to be replaced, so I wanted to be more involved in the correct way to do it. I studied up on the forum, and removed it properly, only to find, as I suspected, that somewhere over last twenty years and at least two windshield replacements, the plastic tabs on the garnish itself have been damaged. The last guy essentially glued it back on.

Again, I studied up on replacing the garnish only to find that getting replacement parts won't be easy.

Also, I've been reading about the "collectors value", which I've learned it surprisingly low. So being "true to original" is not a priority.

With all that said, I thought I might post my solution - I screwed the dang th If it doesn't work, I can always go back to trying to find replacements.ing on. I've always been a "form follows function" guy. Plus I've always liked products that have their fasteners in plain sight. That's what I have here. (FWIW, I made my living as a product designer.)

I removed all the broken tabs. I pressed down, out of the way, all the metal tabs. I covered the holes with duct tape. Then I fastened with self tapping screws. When possible, I drilled the holes close to the tab receiver bodies to minimize distortion. I countersunk the screwheads. I think it'll look pretty good when I repaint. It sure is easy to remove the trim piece now.

Attached are some pics.
 

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Aren't you concerned about those screws rusting?

Otherwise has a NASCAR vibe.
 

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Ugh - drywall screws?? At least find some nice hex head stainless or something, aluminum if you can find them... I'm not too familiar with the way this trim piece fits, never had it off. But, was there no way of attaching it below/underneath the finished surface? I don't like the way the screws dimple the finish. I could see having 'access holes' to screws, where the screws then attach tabs to the car. Otherwise, it looks too janky for my taste, like twice as many screws, too, for such a light piece.
 

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My soul died a little bit upon reading this, but props to you for owning an Insight!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Aren't you concerned about those screws rusting?

A little bit, but not too much. If painted in place, rust might be mitigated. But, if rust IS an issue, I'll replace with stainless steel.

Ugh - drywall screws??
Please don't be mislead by the "drywall screw" label. I use these screws all the time, but never for drywall. Handy little screws with very small diameter. Think of them as specialty screws. Also, my first attempt was low profile pan heads. Didn't like. Very Janky. (had to look that up) Started with fewer screws, but couldn't get it to seal. But do agree with the dimpling problem. I may work on that some more.

My soul died a little bit upon reading this
.I promise
As I mentioned, I've been doing a lot of forum studying. Your's are some of my favorite posters. Please forgive me for killing any of your soul. But... What was soul killing to me was removing mal shaped garnish to discover it was held on with high tech chewing gum. Took be hours to clean it up. As an inventor and product designer (I invented the first plastic folding sawhorse a long time ago) I just hate bad design. I've long thought that Honda put their A Team on the mechanics but their practice squad on the skinning. You should not have to watch Scotts most-excellent video to be able to do it correctly. I remember asking the last windshield guy if he was confident on doing the job right. He said "absolutely, I've been doing this 20 years". That's not good design.

Also, to salve your injured soul a bit more, if I am able to acquire intact pillars somehow, I will use them. Pinky swear.

Oh, BTW, dry seat belts. Yea!
 

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Please don't be mislead by the "drywall screw" label. I use these screws all the time, but never for drywall. Handy little screws with very small diameter. Think of them as specialty screws. Also, my first attempt was low profile pan heads. Didn't like. Very Janky. (had to look that up) Started with fewer screws, but couldn't get it to seal. But do agree with the dimpling problem. I may work on that some more.
A few things that make me hesitant about these screws for this purpose - keeping in mind that I don't have a good conception of exactly what the attachment scenario looks like underneath the trim:

-don't like the self drill - you lose holding power/threads at the tip, so the screws end up being longer than they need to be, plus those self tapping tips usually make the hole too big. Screw and unscrew those a few times and they end up obliterating the hole/threads and then you have zero holding power.

- 1 1/4 inches? That seems pretty long. Are these things screwing into the roof (aluminum) sheet metal?? Like, if you removed the headliner you'd see screws poking through? If so that would seem really awful to me... Thin aluminum medium, self-tapping screws, and...

-the coating. Probably a half-assed zinc plating or dip or something like that. I've never seen a zinc-coated drywall screw, but the zinc coatings on these type of low-cost screws is usually pretty bad. I think zinc is generally OK with aluminum, in terms of galvanic corrosion. But if the coating's only sub-par...

-drywall screws are super-mass produced and they're just shoddy. Maybe it's the metal material - weak and brittle - that make a 1/4 of them have crappy heads - the phillips '+' punch out is often not clean, deep, etc.

-'bugle' head. The contour of the head is somewhat concave, in the shape of a bugle, rather than your typical flat head... Probably wouldn't make a difference with the soft plastic mating surface, but still. A true flat head with no bugle would probably be better, seal better, etc.
 

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My soul died a little bit upon reading this, but props to you for owning an Insight!!!
Not the first or last time I've seen this tbh. Pains me as well, especially since there are better ways. My rear spoiler (aftermarket from the stamps) broke it's tabs so I epoxied them back on. Couldn't tell anything was wrong.

Only time I've really justified this is if it was a $500 beater with an aftermarket TYC (taiwanese crap) bumper that was moulded like **** and doesn't actually clip onto the bumper clips properly (boy, I hate bumper clips... Wish people would have copied the 90s and early 2000s German bumpers. So much easier to work with...). You see some crazy **** pulled off in hack body shops. And the untrained (and even mildly trained) eye will never tell.
 
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