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Advanced diesel engines are one option automakers can turn to for complying with upcoming U.S. fuel-economy standards. German OEMs in particular are the technology’s strongest proponents, but at the opposite end of the Eurasian landmass, Honda is not so bullish.
For the full story on Honda Diesels in the U.S. visit AutoGuide.com
 

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For the full story on Honda Diesels in the U.S. visit AutoGuide.com
That is a huge shame for the US. A manual turbo diesel with cruise control is a great thing for covering distance with economy, and having lots of power on tap when you need it...

US consumers should hire a German or Japanese TDI if they are ever on holiday in Europe, and experience for themselves.

For example your Ford Transit that is powered by a 3.5 V6 is a 2.2 or 2.4 I4 turbo diesel in Europe, and much better for it.
 

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It is a shame really, especially when you compare the fuel logs on Spritmonitor for the Civic hatch with 1.6 i-DTEC diesel engine to the second gen Insight:
Overview: Honda - Civic - Spritmonitor.de

Overview: Honda - Insight - Spritmonitor.de

On average they get better economy than the Insight.
Bear in mind that the Insight is a hybrid so it attracts the eco-minded set to save the world, while the Civic crowd is probably less inclined to save gas, err diesel. And still they get better mileage.

One nice photo of the Civic.
 

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Im not sure, but I hear diesel powered vehicles are illegal in CA. Didnt Italy ban their sales too? I think not going diesel is saving a headache to come. I rather they focus on direct injection gas and ethanol vehicles. Maybe even hybrid? Of course lets focus on 3 seater hybrids so they can still qualify for HOV lanes unlike the 2 seater crz. :mad:
 

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Diesel cars, NOX pollution source

The problem with diesel engine is the high levels of NOX emissions, far higher than petrol engines. European sales of diesel engine cars has been strong for several years but the NOX issue is being recognised as a major issue for the health of town and city inhabitants. Note the moves to discourage the use of diesel cars in towns and cities eg London, by taxation , the London congestion charge.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-28540259

Eu to take legal action over NOX pollution in London:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-26257703

Court Ruling:

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/may/01/government-pollution-supreme-court
 

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Keep in mind that diesel prices have remained in the high 3s while gas prices have gone to 1.80-1.90. A bad value proposition ATM
 

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The problem with diesel engine is the high levels of NOX emissions, far higher than petrol engines. European sales of diesel engine cars has been strong for several years but the NOX issue is being recognised as a major issue for the health of town and city inhabitants. Note the moves to discourage the use of diesel cars in towns and cities eg London, by taxation , the London congestion charge.

UK government failing legal duty on air pollution, supreme court rules | Environment | The Guardian
If what you state was correct simple water mist or water injection would remove the nox.

The truth is the diesel particulate filters are making the "soot" pollution less populous but more deadly (nano particles of soot are harder for your body to remove and cause cancer)

So particulate, not Nox is getting the most attention as a major failure of current emissions.
 

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I previously brought up EU6 emissions and their alignement with Tier3 US SULEV 160.

Diesels in most cases will require urea for SCR and NOx reduction.

The end.
 

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It appears the "soot" folks are also getting debunked, apparently the current gen of emissions (not 2006 or earlier) is shown to be just fine on diesels.

(sorry about the crappy links, GM volt had the source data linky and now I cant find it, thank you crappy search feature)

https://wryheat.wordpress.com/2014/12/03/epa-experiments-on-humans-debunk-their-ozone-and-particulate-matter-health-claims/

EPA exposes exercising asthmatics to 9 times more diesel particulate than deemed safe ? No adverse health effects reported | JunkScience.com
 

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+1 Thats why Ive never been on the diesel bandwagon.
When you next eat anything you bought, think of the huge diesel truck motor that hauled it half way round the country/ or the diesel train that moved it... the US still uses loads of diesel, just not in cars, and there are probably lots of reasons why that is (relatively cheap gas for the main).

As far as I'm concerned all IC related emissions from road vehicles will ultimately be replaced with electric or hydrogen vehicles - it's just a matter of time.

Until that time comes, and it will be good day when it does, manual turbo diesels are the thing I want to drive, regulations permitting... yes NOx/ particulates... but so do power stations, ships, planes, trucks etc...

It is a shame the US never adopted diesel in the way Europe did, there have been some superb engines made, all of which passed the US by. The V6/ V8s may be smooth engines and good for sports car type applications, but they are beaten in every way by a decent diesel... there is a huge amount of torque at low revs, and you hardly need to stir the transmission at all to keep moving.

You can loose at least two cylinders on the equivalent diesel motor for the same torque, and all that torque comes in at 1500-2000 rpm... its a very relaxing drive if you have to cover distance.

When the arguments are put forward, it boils down to a philosophy of more Co2 or more Nox/ soot.... and I don't enter a world of black haze every time I go out in London - it was far worse in the pre-catalyser days with the engines running richer and bellowing fuel vapour out of the exhaust.

Europe was keen to reduce carbon emissions on the back of Nox and soots... is it better? Not sure, but it was a different avenue to take.

Although the DTEC engines are Honda, I am fairly sure these are designed in Europe, for the European market... diesel in Japan was a non-starter, just like the US.

I've not driven the 1.6 DTEC, but I have been considering changing the Celica and Yaris diesel for a Toyota Auris 2.2. T180 diesel, and that thing pulls like a train.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ls23tHPX8mQ
 
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