Honda Insight Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Any thoughts on this question are appreciated. I am a bit confused.

I learned from the second generation Insight forum (on this web site) that the 2010 Insight needs to be driven daily in order to maintain good health of the vehicle.

Is this also true of other cars like the first generation Nissan Leaf or the Toyota Prius C?

Many people who are drawn to electric and hybrid vehicles are, without a doubt, also drawn to the idea of driving less often. Driving less often and making each trip less dependent on gasoline seems like a great way to save money. But what if going days and days at a time without driving actually harms the vehicle and leads to more money spent on repairs?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,421 Posts
Electrics, no. NiMH hybrids, yes, particularly if they are older.

Electrics are Lithium based, and they are balanced at the cell level, they are also charged and balanced routinely.

Hybrids are never charged. NiMH isn't balanced, it's only monitored every 10-12 cells typically, and they tend to have 3X the number of cells vs. lithium cells. Extended periods of sitting will cause imbalance, and the lack of charging means they're reliant on regular operation to keep the battery balanced.

IMHO and YMMV disclaimers apply.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for the summary. After I read what you wrote, I looked in Wikipedia for information on the batteries for the second generation Insight, the Prius C and the Nissan Leaf.

Indeed, the Insight and the Prius C have Ni-MH batteries. By contrast, the first and second generation Leafs (Leaves?) have Li-ion batteries.

Electrics, no. NiMH hybrids, yes, particularly if they are older.

Electrics are Lithium based, and they are balanced at the cell level, they are also charged and balanced routinely.

Hybrids are never charged. NiMH isn't balanced, it's only monitored every 10-12 cells typically, and they tend to have 3X the number of cells vs. lithium cells. Extended periods of sitting will cause imbalance, and the lack of charging means they're reliant on regular operation to keep the battery balanced.
I am sure I have a lot more to learn. One thing I would like to learn next is how well BEV tech tolerates infrequent driving. (Any Nissan Leaf owners around here? I know this is not a Nissan forum.)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,421 Posts
IMUO (in my unprofessional opinion), a BEV, if left on continuous charge, will generally have no issues with infrequent driving.

I have yet to own a BEV, but it's in my future. I envision:

charging daily
only replacing what I used for the day
Minimize the cycle depth (don't charge to full or discharge to empty)
Keep the battery "average" around 60% SoC

Example (EXTREMELY simplified):

I have 100 miles of EV range. I drive 20 miles per day. I would try to charge the battery to 70% and discharge to 50% daily.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top