Honda Insight Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ok I know the rolliing road test can never replicate real road driving but no matter how carefully I drive my 2010 insigt (low mileage) I have never succeeded in getting more than 48.9 mpg -dont get me wrong that is good for a car of its size but so far of the government figures as to make them meaningless - if I recall it mentions up to 62mpg - has anyone ever achieved that off a rolling road?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
mpg

Hi I have just joined the forum and have a uk insight with 30k on the clock which I have owned for 3 weeks.
I have studied the forum pumped extra air in my tires and modified how I drive to ensure I get decent fuel economy which is why I bought the vehicle.
my office is in northwich and I live in leeds so it about 170 mile round trip. I go there 3 days a week so most of my driving is on the very busy m62.
I do not use air con, drive with one window partially down and try to keep the speed ( if traffic will allow) between 55 to 68mph.
I base my fuel economy on what I put in the tank rather than the onboard computer.
so after nearly 1500 miles and am delighted with the economy I am getting which is based on the above just over 62mpg my previous car registered 34 over a 12 month period.
the car is a 2010 year model. I am pleased with all aspects of the car , I don't find it overly noisy or ride badly it thourogly competent all round vehicle.
In the Uk at least were it seems its pretty much the forgotten hybrid it sells for about £5k less than the same year milage prius so overall it does what it says on the can!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
intersting

I do use the air con though on automatic and economy so it hasnt had to work too hard. I guess it is a trade off maybe where a car has air con the official figures should be calculated with it on. I havent had air con before so how much difference does it make - I would have thought the extra drag of an open window would have much the same effect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
mpg

I guess you are right about aircon vs window open, other than that can not comment on my real world mpg and yours?:confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I think it is probably trip difference I have only done one run that was more than 50 miles so the rest i county lane driving. Also I havent checked the actual mpg yet so may get a pleasant surprise - the fuel tank seems to be taking its time emptying!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
It depends on the journey duration and if the engine is cold for me. My daily commute is only 3 miles in reasonable traffic conditions. In this pattern the last 3500 miles give an average of 51.4 mpg (all summer). On a similar run with the engine warm, I'm easily hitting 65+ with some coasting and slightly inflated tyres.

Winter, I can easily drop 5-7 mpg average as I like to be warm and see where I'm going in the morning! I also run stock pressures during the winter to give better grip, just incase.


Sent from AutoGuide.com App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I shall see what filling the tank brings but if the dashboard guide is close to reliable then I haven't managed to get it to 50 with engine warm on a long run. I have been driving carefully keeping the speedo light green as much as possible - though I did cruise at 70 on the motorway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
943 Posts
My best tank was 61 on the MID, 57 calculated from fill ups. I estimate that the MID is actually more accurate because (according to my own comparison against GPS) the speedometer and oedometer underread by about 4-6%. I get an average 8% discrepancy between MID and calculated fuel consumption.

Typically though I get high 40s or low 50s mpg per tank for a 9 mile each way hilly commute and a few other journeys. I have MID trip B keeping track of my lifetime fuel consumption. In about 18000 miles over 2 years I've got 50.4 mpg according to the MID or 46.8 according to calculations from fuel receipts.

The main things that kill mpg are short journeys from cold starts, then crawling traffic, hills and high cruising speeds.

Edit: I do drive at 70mph (73 on the speedo equates to 70 gps for my car) on the motorways but for best fuel consumption I've sometimes allowed some speed to gradually bleed off up hills (keeping speedo turqoise). I take the speed of HGVs as a safe minimum - usually an indicated 60mph. Then build up speed again on the flat or downhill.

I almost never run in eco mode except with cruise control. Only use cruise control on the flat or downhill.

Accelerating in the green is less than optimal most of the time. Aim to get up to speed in at least turqoise but not exceeding 3k rpm.

Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
My best tank was 66 real mpg (i suspect a problem with the pump there) but the last 5 tanks were around or slightly above 60 mpg. See my fuel log.

Have to say, I do drive very moderately. Mostly motorways following the semis at 85 - 90 km/h (55 mph). At sea level, it happens to be quite flat around here.
A trip to Germany's mountains revealed that although fighting the grades is generally bad for FE, the altitude helps greatly. I got my best economy until then.

I almost always keep it in eco mode and I do use CC when I can.

I also reset my B counter at every cold start and compare the FE to my target consumption of 3.8 l/100 km.
If the MID says 6.0 l/100 km at 5 km into the trip I know I'm (6.0 - 3.8 ) l * 5 / 100 = 110 CC over my target.
At 10km it says 4.7 so that's just 90 CC over. Continuing on I see the number dwindle and hopefully get below zero, if conditions are good.
I'm trying to work out how to factor speed and ambient temp into the equasion to get a better understanding of how well I'm doing.

There is a penalty for accelerating fast; sorry to say but what I see is that for best economy you have to keep the RPM as low as you can live with.
I do accelerate fast occasionally - negotiating a busy T junction - but it carries a 10 to 20 CC penalty compared to a gentle 1500 RPM acceleration.
When nobody is around and the engine is warm I keep RPM at the absolute minimum - 1100 RPM below 55 KM/h, from there it rises in conjunction with the speed) and see my trip l/100 km reading drop even while accelerating.

Already have 910 km on this tank, projected remaining range is 0 km for the last 30 km or so. Fuel warning went on yesterday morning at roughly 830 km into the tank. I should be able to do another 50 km on this tank, but won't try. Not this time. Not yet. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
943 Posts
My best tank was 66 real mpg (i suspect a problem with the pump there) but the last 5 tanks were around or slightly above 60 mpg. See my fuel log.:)
You're talking US MPG (according to your fuel log). UK (Imperial) Gallons are about 20% bigger so that puts you in the 70s!

Just wondering what speed limits are like in the Netherlands? The only times I see individual journeys hitting 70mpg (UK) involve rural roads with 30-50mph limits in fairly flat areas. At 70mph peaks, letting speed drop for terrain, seems to be my last chance to hit 60 mpg. I tend to keep up with traffic enough to avoid being an inconvenience to other drivers, even when aiming for fuel economy.

Edit: Also wondering about the 22 mile commute. Is that one way or both?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
You're talking US MPG (according to your fuel log). UK (Imperial) Gallons are about 20% bigger so that puts you in the 70s!

Just wondering what speed limits are like in the Netherlands? The only times I see individual journeys hitting 70mpg (UK) involve rural roads with 30-50mph limits in fairly flat areas. At 70mph peaks, letting speed drop for terrain, seems to be my last chance to hit 60 mpg. I tend to keep up with traffic enough to avoid being an inconvenience to other drivers, even when aiming for fuel economy.

Edit: Also wondering about the 22 mile commute. Is that one way or both?
Err, yes. Hadn't noticed you're all from Ol' Blighty. 'Official UK figures'... that figures :)
This car uses less fuel than my previous car (Nissan Almera); not just per distance but also on a time base. I even have to fuel it less frequently, even though the tank is smaller (40 i.o. 50 l) and I now work fulltime instead of 3 days a week.
My wife lost her job so I wanted a car that gets good fuel economy to keep the cost down. It worked :)

Speed limits over here:
50 km/h (31 mph) in towns,
60, 80 or 100 km/h (38/50/62 mph) on rural roads and non-motorway multilane roads, as indicated,
100, 120 or 130 km/h (62/74/80 mph) on motorways, as indicated. Many people drive at about 120 km/h, only marginally adjusting to the actual speed limit...

I move with the lorry's. I keep enough distance to be safe, in fact more than the usual driver does. Most of my driving is on a motorway that has 4 lanes each direction, so anyone can pass me. Even so I speed up to 95 km/h when not drafting, just to keep the speed difference in reasonable range. Of course everyone else likes to pass the lorries, so no tailgating there.

When I visit my inlaws I have to take a long two-lane (one each way) 100 km/h road where passing is forbidden. I keep up with traffic there as to not be a nuisance, but that usually is both the fastest and least economical stretch of the journey ;)

The 22 mile of my commute is the one way distance (Nieuwegein to Gouda) so 44 miles per day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
Ok... 22 mile commute, not exceeding 59 mph, presumably on fairly flat terrain?

I can see how those figures are achievable now, but still - good work!

Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
Thanks! It is a hobby, and I'm totally hooked.
Then I just achieved the unachievable today: over 70 mpug (US) or 85 mpig (Imperial) for a tankfull!
Unbelievable? Check the story on ecomodder.
Sorry for crosslinking but I got tired of retyping the same story again and again, and we have those links.

My commute is mostly flat, but the motorway (through the so-called "green heart") is riddled with canal bridges, elevated road an railway crossings and on/off ramps; so much so that there is hardly one kilometer where nothing happens. The elevations are typically 5 meters high and there are 17 of them in just as many miles. On many of them I can get a short motorway 'glide', even spontaneously when on CC.

Wind is the all-deciding factor. A strong southern or northern (side) wind can almost double the fuel consumption on that stretch. There is a section with a lot of trees, sometimes I'm almost begging to reach that.

There is another, less cheerful reason for me to drive slow.
I suffer from tinnitus. Which means that my ears ring with high-pitched noise all the time. 24/7. They do now while I'm typing this. They ring at normal conversation strength. As you can imagine, I have trouble decyphering speech from people who speak muted.
Driving slow reduces the noise level in a car. It reduces the effect of my tinnitus. It does make a difference on my personal life way beyond the original driving.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
little dissappointing

I had my second fill up today in my 2010 Insight and from comments made by others I had been hopeful that it would have been achieving slightly better than the readout. The dashboard shows an average of 48.2 mpg so had been hoping it would pan out around 50 - however the between fill ups MPG was only 45.3 - however this was a shorter period than the meter was showing. I guess time will tell but I have been driving it quite carefully and had really been hoping for more than 50mpg which is what I was achieving in my petrol only manual Jazz 1.2
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
943 Posts
Think you may have misunderstood. The MID usually shows a few mpg better than calculated.

However, the oedometer under reads slightly, so you will actually be getting slightly better than your calculation.

Edit: when I had a 1.2 Jazz courtesy car, I was only getting a few mpg less than I do in the Insight.

Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Hi,

Have had my 2009 insight for a couple of months now and the trip is showing an average of 43.6 mpg. I mainly do local driving usually no more than 10 miles or so at a time. Not really what you would call city driving but not motorway driving either. More what I would call suburban driving (local roads/ring-roads etc.) I have been driving with the Eco Mode on and been trying to keep the speedometer in 'green' as much as possible. I was hoping that this type of driving would be where a hybrid would excel so a little disappointed so far with the average MPG (not expecting the manufactures figures but thought maybe in the 50's. Hopefully, as I become more accustomed to the car, the MPG will improve.

Regards

Andy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
Short trips with a cold engine kill mpg on any car, the I2 fares no different.
You can check for problems like hot brakes (dragging), wheel alignment, low or medium tire pressure, unblocked grills, absent HIDs and LEDs, running away a bit here ;)

Reset your trip counter on every cold start. Keep a fuel log. Visit ecomodder.com. Once you do all this you will be unable to keep your fuel economy as low as current, even if you try.

Cheers, Bart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
943 Posts
Hi,

Have had my 2009 insight for a couple of months now and the trip is showing an average of 43.6 mpg. I mainly do local driving usually no more than 10 miles or so at a time. Not really what you would call city driving but not motorway driving either. More what I would call suburban driving (local roads/ring-roads etc.) I have been driving with the Eco Mode on and been trying to keep the speedometer in 'green' as much as possible. I was hoping that this type of driving would be where a hybrid would excel so a little disappointed so far with the average MPG (not expecting the manufactures figures but thought maybe in the 50's. Hopefully, as I become more accustomed to the car, the MPG will improve.

Regards

Andy.
Sounds very much like my usage. If there are hills where you are, keeping the speedo in the green uphill from starting won't help. Better to get up to speed promptly (keeping rpm down reasonably) and then look to stay green. Counter-intuitively, minimising electrical assist when accelerating will help thpugg. It means the car is far more likely to avoid going into regen, and if charge is high, it may cruise on the battery only.

I ditched eco mode and it didn't hurt fuel economy at all, plus makes the car far more responsive and enjoyable to drive. Under 40mph just turn off air-con and open the windows a crack. Over that shut the windows and use air-con.

You may have heard the term 'drive without brakes' or dwb. I found that the biggest help. Try to minimise your use of the brakes' through anticipation.

As for my own fuel economy, I typically get low 50s mpg in summer and mid 40s in winter.


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
mpg uk

I get 60 from mine when driving carefully on motorways, 50 round town (although this has dropped in colder weather recently) and about 56 on cruise)

When I bought mine, the salesman said to expect 50mpg on average in real world, I do a 50/50 mix of mway and town and get 49.5mpg. Quite happy with that.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
About this Discussion
18 Replies
7 Participants
ES_2010
Honda Insight Forum
We’re the ultimate Honda Insight forum to talk about Honda’s hybrid car and its fuel economy and specs!
Full Forum Listing
Top