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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)


51.02 Actual MPG. Fill took 9.1 gal after 2nd click off. Last tank was 45.5, and i though THAT was good... This tank was less highway travel than normal. A lot of 45 mph roads. I can get used to this! :)
 

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Was just going to post same MPG results on this tank so far... 54.3 indicated which will be about 50-52 measured. The surprise comes when you figure that I'm lugging my bicycle on the hitch rack, and using A/C.

Driving has been a mix of back roads, 35 to 50 mph and a few blasts down the interstate (Turnpike here in Maine) at 65-70 mph. And remember that I climb 712 feet each time I come home from the coastal sections of the State. Been doing much of my bicycle riding near the coast where it's a little cooler.

EPA must have measured MPG for the Insight on a cold January day, climbing Pikes Peak in Colorado with a full load of people aboard. It's the only way they could have gotten consistent 44 mpg runs... and they didn't measure coming back down!

My wife's Prius is beating me by about a 1 to 2 MPG right now, but she doesn't have a bicycle messing up the aero out back, like I do most of the time. That will change when the A/C is no longer needed and I start riding here in the hills (where I live) as the weather cools off in the next month or so.

The car still amazes. Too bad it got mild reviews upon introduction and Honda let EPA get away with such poor MPG test results. This car is just as efficient as the Prius in most cases.
 

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Objectively speaking, the EPA seems to have put in a pretty good estimate.

All the I2s on Fuelly are averaging 44 mpgUS (mainly US vehicles) On www.honestjohn.co.uk they're averaging 43mpgUS (mainly UK vehicles).

Maybe you'd prefer Europe's NEDC rating? That has I2s (depending on exact model) getting 51-57mpgUS combined figures.

I'm personally averaging much closer to the EPA figures.

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Discussion Starter #5
Objectively speaking, the EPA seems to have put in a pretty good estimate.

All the I2s on Fuelly are averaging 44 mpgUS (mainly US vehicles) On www.honestjohn.co.uk they're averaging 43mpgUS (mainly UK vehicles).

Maybe you'd prefer Europe's NEDC rating? That has I2s (depending on exact model) getting 51-57mpgUS combined figures.

I'm personally averaging much closer to the EPA figures.

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Just depends on your particular commute. If you do a lot of highway driving at 70-75 mph, combined with normal city driving, you will get 43 - 45 mpg, or less if you don't try. If you take back roads, maximize driving techniques, try really hard, you can get much higher of course.


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The majority of people don't try much and the EPA has to pick a representative figure for all vehicles not play to the I2's strengths.

It all depends on where, when, how far and how fast you drive.

Short journeys, temperatures, hills, speed, traffic and driving style all contribute.

When I say close to the EPA average, I'm talking over 26,000 miles. I've seen individual journeys over 70 mpg. I sometimes see the 20s too. Same driving style for both. The main difference is where I drive and the length of journey.

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The majority of people don't try much and the EPA has to pick a representative figure for all vehicles not play to the I2's strengths.

It all depends on where, when, how far and how fast you drive.

Short journeys, temperatures, hills, speed, traffic and driving style all contribute.

When I say close to the EPA average, I'm talking over 26,000 miles. I've seen individual journeys over 70 mpg. I sometimes see the 20s too. Same driving style for both. The main difference is where I drive and the length of journey.

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I agree with you 100%. Plus, the I2 is not a car that you can just hop into for the first time, and get awesome mpg. It took me a 3-4 tanks of gas to finally break 45 mpg for a full tank average. My first tank was like 36 mpg. There is a YouTube consumer reports review on the 2011 insight where the guy just trashed the car saying the technology was outdated and honda needs to go back to the drawing board, etc. He admitted he averaged 36 mpg, but his wife got a little more. He was probably given the car for a week or less to generate an opinion. Nobody can give an accurate review on this car in a weeks time. If he would have popped 51 mpg during his review, I'm sure he would sing a different tune.


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The Insight like many other Hondas and I imagine other vehicles learns and adjusts to your driving style. For example when I owned a scion it was demostrated if you accelerated past you desired speed, then lift off the throttle and reapply pressure to a slightly slower speed you got better mpg for your trip. It was also suggested when you changed the intake or exhaust to disconnect the battery wait 15 minutes, then let the car idle for 15 minutes to relearn.

I agree with you 100%. Plus, the I2 is not a car that you can just hop into for the first time, and get awesome mpg. It took me a 3-4 tanks of gas to finally break 45 mpg for a full tank average.
 

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I suppose EPA may be fairly average compared to that fuely norm.

On the other hand, I feel I'm a fairly average driver in fairly average driving conditions that include plenty of hill terrain and differing road speed limits. I don't think I'm doing any thing differently than when I drive other vehicles.

Not sure how much one would have to beat up the accelerator to get such low EPA numbers with this car. On the trip home from the dealership 800 miles away or so, the indicated MPG climbed through the 40s into the 50-55 mpg range, driving 60 to 75 mph on interstates.

I was very surprised that this MPG range came up during the trip. Have yet to measure anything lower than 50 mpg this Summer so far. The indicated has been steady between 54 and 58 mpg, that when calculated at the gas pump has stayed at 50 mpg or better.

I would imagine that lower MPG figures might be more attributable to a set of less than good quality non low rolling resistance replacement tires on an Insight, plus running those tires on the car with lower than recommended pressure. That's one thing I do notice a lot of on the roads... flabby looking tires that are alarmingly below recommended on many vehicles.

Or maybe some of us just have really fuel frugal examples!
 

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My thinking has been that the I2's mpg is more sensitive to driving style than most cars. So the EPA figures fit most drivers because their test is designed to reflect that driving style.

So if you drive like most people, some additional air in the tires is a difference that makes an mpg difference for most people. Add in some basic driving style changes in the high mpg direction, and your mpg makes another leap, and you are probably in the upper 40's mpg (using odometer and gas pump numbers). Throw-in some subtleties of driving style, reduced highway speeds, flat terrain, many miles at 35-50 mph, warm temperatures, favorable winds, & etc., etc. mpg's in the low 50's and higher are possible and can become routine.
 

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My thinking has been that the I2's mpg is more sensitive to driving style than most cars. So the EPA figures fit most drivers because their test is designed to reflect that driving style.

So if you drive like most people, some additional air in the tires is a difference that makes an mpg difference for most people. Add in some basic driving style changes in the high mpg direction, and your mpg makes another leap, and you are probably in the upper 40's mpg (using odometer and gas pump numbers). Throw-in some subtleties of driving style, reduced highway speeds, flat terrain, many miles at 35-50 mph, warm temperatures, favorable winds, & etc., etc. mpg's in the low 50's and higher are possible and can become routine.
I must be extremely subtle!:)
 

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And I can almost never beat the EPA combined mpg... *shrugs
 

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And I can almost never beat the EPA combined mpg... *shrugs
Don't know what kind of driving you do or where, but I learned a long time ago that it's pretty easy to beat MPG ratings.

Bought my first Honda in '74, a hatchback CVCC manual as a second car and noticed right away that I didn't have to fill as often as I did our first car. We started taking our trips in that car and found that speed was the determining factor between getting great and fantastic MPG with the little Honda. Speed limit travel gave us about 4-6 mpg more than what we were able to get if we traveled 5 to 10 mph above speed limits.

In '80, we bought a German built diesel Rabbit/Golf. That thing was amazingly frugal, especially in 5th gear at 60-65 mph. We took that thing all over the U.S. and were getting an average of 50 mpg. Ended up working in Phoenix for about 4 years, switched to Arco Graphite oil and the fuel mileage went up to a steady 55 mpg on my commutes. Arco Graphite oil disappeared from the market after a few years. The stuff was really slick and everyone I knew was getting significantly improved MPGs using it. The 4 years I used it, the engine never complained and never had maintenance issues.

One car that I bought and thought it may have been a mistake MPG wise, is my '93 Civic Coupe EX-O. That thing was EPA rated 29 city/ 35 highway/ and 33 combined for the manual. I basically get 40 mpg with that thing to this day.

I drive mostly rural roads, with some Interstate on a daily basis. Have lived in plenty of hilly/mountain terrain, we moved to Northwestern Montana for 12 years and then moved here to South Central Maine the last 19 years.

Don't think I've ever had a car that didn't beat EPA ratings. Of course, like Moviemike so perfectly expressed it, you really "gotta wanna" do it.

I've kind of equated that the less fuel I burn, the happier my bank account gets! Figure I've been driving close to 45 years, so saving a little all those years definitely piles up!:)
 

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"It's pretty easy to beat the EPA ratings" is a pretty sweeping statement. That may not be true for someone with a shorter commute and a colder climate than you have.

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Not with the combination of a cold climate and a short commute, but even when it was way below freezing I could easily get better than EPA by keeping in the slow lane on long trips.
It is not hard to do, I think that's what he meant. It may not fit your commute well, but you can drive it somewhere and get better than EPA at minus 10°C.

(All of my tanks had better than EPA FE, even those in February 2013 with continuous frost dipping to -14°C. That was 90% commute, 10% shopping and school run)
 

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"It's pretty easy to beat the EPA ratings" is a pretty sweeping statement. That may not be true for someone with a shorter commute and a colder climate than you have.

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Guess I didn't realize that Maine has a way warmer climate than most! Same for Northwestern Montana.

We're talking Summer (in northern Hemisphere) at moment. Temps in the mild realm. Winter poses different circumstances. Not many drive in cold weather year round, except possibly those living in Antarctica.:rolleyes:
 

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"it's pretty easy to beat MPG ratings"... Not that easy to beat the EPA ratings on this car for sure. At least on the roads I drive in California. I drive about 70% highway and maybe 30% city and I barely average 40 mpg. Well for one, I don't drive slow unlike some hybrid drivers on the highway. In the city, I try my best to keep up with the flow of the traffic when accelerating from a stop.

This is actually the only car that I cannot beat the EPA ratings. The other car I drive is a 2014 Mazda CX-5 2.5L AWD and the EPA combined is about 26. I usually average 28-30 on that car.

I guess the Insight is lacking power on the highway to keep the speed at a steady pace and need a lot more throttle to gain a little bit more speed compared to other cars.
 

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Ya might try checking your tire pressures. I believe 30 all around is in the manual, which means you can go to 33 without noticing any change. After reading long discussion here I went to 36 all around, and barely noticed any negative impact on handling at 70mph+. Others have gone over 40 psi. I run at 39, average 50 mpg and attribute 40% of the increase over EPA to tire pressures alone!

Try doing more coasting with your foot off of the gas pedal, especially from high speeds. Gently tap the brake pedal, and ride the brakes where you can. This will charge the IMA battery more and give you similar acceleration with less gas pedal pressure. I attribute 20% of the my increase over EPA to these and other subtleties of driving style.
 
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