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WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today announced that it expects to make a final determination in mid-2010 regarding whether to increase the allowable ethanol content in fuel.

In a letter sent today to Growth Energy – a bio fuels industry association that had asked EPA to grant a waiver that would allow for the use of up to 15 percent of ethanol in gasoline – the agency said that while not all tests have been completed, the results of two tests indicate that engines in newer cars likely can handle an ethanol blend higher than the current 10-percent limit. The agency will decide whether to raise the blending limit when more testing data is available. EPA also announced that it has begun the process to craft the labeling requirements that will be necessary if the blending limit is raised.

In March 2009, Growth Energy requested a waiver to allow for the use of up to 15 percent ethanol in gasoline, an increase of five percent points. Under the Clean Air Act, EPA was required to respond to the waiver request by December 1, 2009. EPA has been evaluating the group’s request and has received a broad range of public comments as part of the administrative rulemaking process. EPA and the Department of Energy also undertook a number of studies to determine whether cars could handle higher ethanol blends. Testing has been proceeding as quickly as possible given the available testing facilities.

Full text of the letter:
http://www.epa.gov/otaq/regs/fuels/additive/lettertogrowthenergy11-30-09.pdf

They currently have data on only two vehicles:rolleyes: and announce vehicles 2001 and newer will likely be able to accomodate higher ethanol blends. If it's not good for a 2000 vehicle how can it possibly be any good for a newer one??:confused:
 

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Corn-based ethanol is a complete scam. The only reason it's cheaper than gasoline is because we subsidize the price of corn with our tax dollars. The corn industry is a powerful lobbying group, however, so it wouldn't surprise me if the EPA allowed this.

As a side note, I'd recommend the recent documentary "Food, Inc." for anyone who wishes to learn more about this topic.
 

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Seems like it would be easier if people just stopped driving such fuel inefficient cars. Then again, this is the land of giant cars and corn in everything... Doing something practical would just be insane! :/
 
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