Honda Insight Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My main reason for joining this forum was to get an answer to this question. I've browsed through some of the older threads in this subforum and seen that some hypermilers have used engine-off coasting (EOC) with their Insights. I've even seen some Youtube videos. I'm not sure if these drivers had auto or standard transmissions ... does the dashboard display look different for standards? If so, the cars in the youtube videos were automatics.

I had been led to believe that this technique was detrimental to automatic transmissions. I've seen advice that says not to use EOC if the car cannot be flat-towed. I looked for this in the manual but saw nothing about flat-towing, only that the car should not be shifted to neutral above 35 mph, so I assume that flat-towing is not recommended?

Is that advice to be taken with a grain of salt? What harm will be done to the transmission?
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,933 Posts
Was this thread meant for the 1st or 2nd generation Insight?

The 2nd generation is only available in a CVT.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Hi Eli! If I have a GI Insight with CVT,can I use the EOC or LAS above 40 MPH?
Why would I need two joy sticks? Thnks! Rich
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
:confused: You seem to be implying that my question is stupid. OK, I confess I'm somewhat ignorant when it comes to cars. Please stop taking the piss and explain why my question is stupid. Especially when I seem to be getting contradictory advice from this place and others.

Whatever happened to "the only stupid questions are the ones that aren't asked"?

PS. If I misinterpreted the "joysticks" comment, I do apologize.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
958 Posts
CVT and coasting

:confused: You seem to be implying that my question is stupid. OK, I confess I'm somewhat ignorant when it comes to cars. Please stop taking the piss and explain why my question is stupid. Especially when I seem to be getting contradictory advice from this place and others.

Whatever happened to "the only stupid questions are the ones that aren't asked"?
I don't know about the 2nGen CVT, you are on your own there. With the Gen1 CVT coasting is not the problem. Stuffing it back into DRIVE at speeds over about 4MPH will destroy/wear out the start-up clutch in short order. The start-up clutch simply is not robust enough to take that kind of abuse. You may want to keep abusing your CVT. If so, please report back with your experiences so we may all profit from them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I don't know about the 2nGen CVT, you are on your own there. With the Gen1 CVT coasting is not the problem. Stuffing it back into DRIVE at speeds over about 4MPH will destroy/wear out the start-up clutch in short order. The start-up clutch simply is not robust enough to take that kind of abuse. You may want to keep abusing your CVT. If so, please report back with your experiences so we may all profit from them.
Oh, I'm not using this technique - I'm trying to figure out if this is something that should even be tried with the I2. I've been reading about pulse-and-glide with eoc for several weeks now and had come to the conclusion that the technique was not applicable to the I2 - it seemed to be a technique more suited to cars with standard transmissions.

Then I came across posts in this thread where the people said they had used FAS while gliding, in addition to seeing the videos where people had demonstrated shifting to neutral and switching off the engine while coasting. So now I'm wondering if I had come to the correct conclusion. You seem to be confirming my original conclusion - thanks for your input.

Again, I'm a really good SQL Server dba and programmer, but when it comes to cars I'm clueless compared to most of you people.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,933 Posts
:confused: You seem to be implying that my question is stupid. OK, I confess I'm somewhat ignorant when it comes to cars. Please stop taking the piss and explain why my question is stupid. Especially when I seem to be getting contradictory advice from this place and others.

Whatever happened to "the only stupid questions are the ones that aren't asked"?

PS. If I misinterpreted the "joysticks" comment, I do apologize.
That's not what he meant.. he cross posted. He was talking about MIMA for the 1st gen.

I wish I could answer your question, but I've never even driven a CVT Insight so I am not sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
That's not what he meant.. he cross posted. He was talking about MIMA for the 1st gen.
Darn! Sorry Rich. Joysticks, eh? Now I'm intrigued - guess I need to go investigate that MIMA thing.

I wish I could answer your question, but I've never even driven a CVT Insight so I am not sure.
Well, I'm still getting the impression that it's not good for the CVT so that's where I guess I will leave it until hearing otherwise.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
The reason its bad is that the engine turns the oil pump and if you flat tow it you will run out of lubrication.

Even if you leave the engine running, pulse and glide does help mpg.

Ive shifted from nutral and drive countless times with no noises, motion, etc.

Sent from my Autoguide iPod touch app
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Even if you leave the engine running, pulse and glide does help mpg.
So how do you prevent the "glide" from slowing the car too quickly to regain the mpg lost during the "pulse"?

By using EV during the glide? In my attempts, this seems to only work at low speeds on downgrades, and some of that gained mpg is lost later when the battery has to regen.

Or by shifting to neutral during the glide?
If you shift to neutral during the glide, do you ever do that above 35 mph contrary to the recommendation in the manual? What are the risks of ignoring that recommendation?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,814 Posts
On another forum I came across some old posts and emailed the user. I do not believe he has an Insight any longer (he had a 2003). I exchanged a number of emails with him and he supplied the following:

I've shut it off at highway speeds. 70mph+ You only have to turn it off, not all the way back.


I recommend restarting with the lowest speed possible. At speeds over 30-35 there is some jerking sometimes, and over 55 it's not pretty. Start the engine first, then shift back to drive. I usually feather the gas as I shift. Get used to shifting into neutral and leaving the engine on at first. Neutral gliding probably gives 75% of the benefit of a FAS anyway. Truthfully, I don't use the FAS often above about 25mph. But it's important when you're still getting the engine up to temp, especially in the winter. Keeps you from having to idle through the first few stop lights, if you don't get a normal auto stop.


Hopefully that helps.

So a F(orced) A(uto) S(top) just means killing the engine while still moving. The CVT will only shut off on it's own at about 4-5mph. There's ton's of good places around the county where you can coast forever on momentum and elevation. For example, heading north on 31 into McHenry there's some massive downhills. As you're coming to the crest you can ease off the gas and drop well below the speed limit. At the top, shift to neutral. Wait for the RPMs to stabilize (down around 800-1000). That usually takes a few seconds. Then key the engine off. Wait for the engine to go off (another full second). Then turn the ignition back to "on." That gives you back your interior power, so your radio comes back on, and your power steering works. Your power brakes will only work with as much fluid as you have in the pipe. That's not to say you'll lose your brakes, but they'll be much harder to push after the lines are drained of fluid.

I've done clinics with a lot of the cleanmpg guys (including Wayne), which is where I learned all the driving technique stuff from.

Anyone else care to comment on their experience with the CVT and forced auto stopping? I have not got up the nerve to even try neutral coasting for fear of damage to the CVT.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,871 Posts
Your brake lines are NEVER void of fluid. It'a a vacuum/pressure reaction, NOT a loss of fluid.
HTH
Willie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,814 Posts
I assumed that what he meant was that after using the brakes a few times with the engine shut off you will no longer have the vacuum "power" assist, and they will take a lot more effort to stop the car.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,933 Posts
That is what he meant, but his understanding of how it works is seriously flawed. ;)
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top