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Just wanted to express my delight with my Insight! Here in NH, we had our first "real" Nor'Easter of the season and my little car did a great job on my 16 mile (one-way), hilly commute! It was even plowed in when I got to it in the morning and just to test her out, I drove right through it with no problem. There were trucks and SUVs fishtailing through intersections, but the Insight did great despite the fact that I didn't put snow tires on it! I'm relieved and proud!
 

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Good to know. We have to drive up to Oregon for visiting relatives at the end of the year, and were debating taking the truck (Honda Ridgeline, gets about 16-18 mpg) versus our CVT Insight (which gets about 50 mpg) (too lazy to take the manual Insight, which is getting around 64 mpg). It snows in Jacksonville, and the relations live on the side of a small mountain. Maybe the Insight would do ok, though, and save us over $200 in round-trip gas!
 

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during that same storm, here in CT...our roads were like glass that night(plus no one in CT knows how to drive in winter weather)...i saw a 9 car and truck accident, a 9 car pile up, three 2 cars accidents, and a 1 car accident...my insight performed perfectly, and even though i was doing 30mph with everyone else on the highway :lol: i managed to make it home and the insight never slipped up :D
 

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... my little car did a great job on my 16 mile (one-way), hilly commute! It was even plowed in when I got to it in the morning and just to test her out, I drove right through it with no problem.
... SUVs fishtailing through intersections, but the Insight did great despite the fact that I didn't put snow tires on it!
For a lilghtweight car they do handle well in the snow, up to about four or five inches of it.

As for being plowed in, if you try to ram your way out of a snow bank, due to the fact that the car is so low to the ground, you do run the risk if crushing up the under carriage, the plastic areas in the front - not recommended.

About those SUV's "fishtailig, yesterday at about 10:30 on the way back from shopping, going down PA Route 940 in the Pocono Summit area and a woman driver in a SUV, too impatient I guess and/or too inexperienced to be driving on a highway covered with drifting snow, passed me at a high rate of speed and in a space of less than a minute, not once but twice the goof ended up perpendicuar to the road. It's one of those things you had to see to believe it - "flooring it" all the way as she tried to straighten herself out! Morale of the story - when driving an Insight in the snow, be alert for the idiots - aside from that you'll probably be alright.

Fred / Proud Owner of "The Silver Bullet"
 

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The insight has a very narrow rear track, this means the distance between the rear tires is much narrower then the distance between the front tires.
When driving in snow that is several inches deep the rear tires try to drive in the path the front tires leave behind causing the rear of the Insight to wander and fishtail even when driving straight or on a large radius turn.
 

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thanks guillermo, i didnt think of that, something to remember when i drive in the snow this winter :idea:
 

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From my experience, the Insight does OK in snow. However, with a depth over 8", because of the undercarriage baffles, the Insight becomes a ski, and traction is effectively lost.
Another precaution: over-inflated tires provide less traction.

If you get into a fender bender (with significantly higher risk in snowy conditions) remember that the Insight is obsolete, and with the high costs of aluminum chassis/body repair, your insurance company will probably total it.

That's why, when it snows heavily (and even the all-weather bicycle is too risky) I commute with my son's Saturn, so that someday, he can inherit my Insight :)
 

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I've had my Insight since 2002 here in Wisconsin and have been generally happy with it in snow, but this past weekend and yesterday we had snow AND cold weather and for whatever reason, I had problems with traction. Just seemed like I was on ice. Had to go about 25 and still it seemed to wonder a bit. I think the hard packed snow was a problem and it acted like ice. I may reduce tire pressure a bit and see if that helps.
 

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First snowstorm - Insight handled beautifully

I got caught in an epic traffic jam in RI during last Thursday's snow storm. Left Easton, MA at 12:45 (couldn't locate my carpool mate or I would have avoided the whole mess) and pulled into East Greenwich, RI at 11:00 pm.
The one bright spot was the performance of the Insight, maneuvering around stuck cars, maintaining a fairly straight line while SUVs were fishtailing, etc.
The only problem was when the snow on I95 got so deep that the ruts were deeper than the ground clearance, and I was hung up on one for about two minutes. Shot my mpg for the month, though.
 

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I've seen snow blowers with chains on their tires, so there is hope they sell tire chains for small tires, but they are usually wide little tires.
 

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Yes, snowblowers and garden tractors too.
 

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Unfortunately the wheel and tire I have is predominantly used on pocket bikes and scooters. 90/65-8 or 2.75X3.0-8. Have not found a chain for that size. Snow blower tires tend to be much wider. The other issue is the belt guard is pretty close to the tire, so I need a low profile side to the chain. That guard could be trimmed if necessary. The tires are only $15-$20, and tubes are available, so I may buy a new tire, and tube, take the old tire off, and add studs like the bike ice racers do? I would much rather have a simple to install and remove chain though. Never easy! :roll: ;)
 

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That was my other plan if I can't find something. I have a nicopress tool and some aircraft SS wire rope. I could swear that I saw some nylon bands with metal cleats somewhere, but can't seem to find them now.
The rain we got sunday night washed away a good part of the snow.

I had a FWD Subaru FE coop back in 79. That car would go 65 in 5" of snow, and never got stuck. It had narrow tires and was pretty light like the Insight.

I know that some of the guys use snow tires on the Insight. I would guess that the car's traction gets a lot better once fitted with a more aggressive set of tires.
I live on top of a 600 foot hill, so when the roads are bad, I can have some trouble getting home. I usually just drop the Potenzas tire pressure to 35 if I get into a slippery condition and that takes care of it, but it would be nice to just drop my traction enhanced E-Wheel.

My spare tire and compressor are usually at 70PSI, and I carry a small diameter airline in winter so I can bump the pressure back to 44 once I get back on dry roads.
 
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