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I've noticed if you keep your foot on the pedal just right you can spike it to 100. I suppose this is the I2's elusive "EV mode." I noticed someone mention it on here and tried it for myself, it's do-able. It's not sustainable for too long because of so many factors encountered on the road.

I was cruising along with the MPG gauge pegged at 100 driving 55MPH for a short time yesterday until I drove across a bumpy bridge which screwed it for me, you're a hair-trigger of pedal pressure from losing it.

It seems easiest to get into when you're coming down from the other side of an incline, and I do not mean completely remove your foot from the gas pedal.
Loved reading this :). I've had many of the same experiences.

One of the things I've noticed, in doing this alot, is that the battery will run down. Then to recharge the battery, I'll drive through a period of a notch or two of "Chg", and reduced mpg on the slider. Sometimes I wonder if the mpg decrease from recharging the battery nullifies the mpg gain from the ev mode run?

Anyway, the follow-up challenge for me is "BATTERY MANAGEMENT." That's where you make a plan to use coasting, brake riding, or down grades to recharge the battery AFTER a long run in ev mode.
 

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I noticed exactly what you're talking about, cruising around in the (so-called?) EV-mode will definitely zap the battery at a quick clip.

Nonetheless, about 6k miles and we're about to finally hit 42MPG for an overall tank. lol.
 

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First tank MPG dealer fillup

Well I filled my new 2011 Insight base up for the first time since I picked the car up last Thursday and had 398.5 miles on the tank with a gauge reading of 53.1 MPG average but I was able to squeeze in 9.072 gallons of gas which comes out to 43.9 real MPG. I can not believe the gauge would be off by that much, I am hoping that because the tank was filled by the dealer they did not fill it all the way up. Seems like to big a difference to me. All in all not bad mileage for my first tank, learning to drive the car for the best mileage and all.


2011 Insight Base, Crimson Pearl
 

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Well I filled my new 2011 Insight base up for the first time since I picked the car up last Thursday and had 398.5 miles on the tank with a gauge reading of 53.1 MPG average but I was able to squeeze in 9.072 gallons of gas which comes out to 43.9 real MPG. I can not believe the gauge would be off by that much....
The gauge on the MID (Mult Information Display) is optimistic, but not that much optimistic. The last time I checked, the gauge was 2.62 mpg higher than real mpg, when averaged over 5 tankfulls. I've complained to Honda about it (in the summer of '09), but as far as I know no software upgrade has been made.

BTW To improve the accuracy of your REAL mpg computations, it is important that you fill your tank to exactly the same point it was at the prior fillup. In order to more accurately determine the amount of gasoline used.

Zwolfe: "EV" or "Electric Vehicle" mode was a phrase I, and others here, used alot last year as we discovered and figured out how to best make use of it for best mpg.
 

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I am new to the Insight so hopefully this does not sound too dumb but what do you mean fill it the same way each time? If I stopped filling the first time the pump kicked off I only would have been able to get 7.5 gallons in the car (53 MPG) but by slowing topping off the tank was able to get 9.072 gallons in dropping the mileage to 43.3 MPG. Is that what you mean, just stop at the first time the pump kicks off? The tank is not really "full" at the first click. So far, I am enjoying this car and making a game out of getting the best mileage.

2011 Insight Base Crimson Pearl
 

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I am new to the Insight so hopefully this does not sound too dumb but what do you mean fill it the same way each time? If I stopped filling the first time the pump kicked off I only would have been able to get 7.5 gallons in the car (53 MPG) but by slowing topping off the tank was able to get 9.072 gallons in dropping the mileage to 43.3 MPG.
So how many gallons were used since the last fillup? Was it 7.5 or 9.072 or some other number?

By filling your tank to exactly the same point that it was at the prior fillup, you will know how many gallons were used. And then your hand calculations of mpg will be accurate.
Accurate hand calculations of mpg allow you to check the accuracy of the cars mpg gauge.
 

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Moviemike, I was going to reply yesterday but I wanted to test my Insight once again.

I got that chance this past evening.

At high MPH, I'm going to say above 50 MPH, whenever I see the MPG gauge max out if I flip over to the battery screen I see the battery not being utilized, only the engine. Perhaps it does this at lower MPH as well. But regardless, the 100+ MPG is being done with just the engine and the battery is idle.

Now if I press down on the pedal slightly more, it will drop to about 75MPG or somewhere above 50. Switching over to the battery screen will show the I2 being powered by the engine AND the battery in that case.

This is repeatable all day long.

I don't know if the system is being a liar or what, but that's what I'm getting.

That's where I came up with so-called EV mode, because, at face value with what the system shows, the battery is not even part of the equation until it drops under 100.

Today I made a trip to Parkersburg, about 30 or so miles away. Took 77 up, pulled in about 41MPG going between 70-75MPH most of the time.

Took the rural route back along the Ohio river and scored my highest MPG yet of 49.x MPG driving between 55 to 70MPH (I'd hold the accelerator pedal slightly down the entire way down hills to pick up momentum sometimes in hilly sections.)
 

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I don't know if the system is being a liar or what, but that's what I'm getting.
The system is not a liar. We have explored and discussed this a bit last year here :
http://www.insightcentral.net/forums/honda-insight-forum-2nd-gen-discussion/17823-sahm-super-atkinson-highway-mode-insight-2-a.html

And here:
http://www.insightcentral.net/forums/honda-insight-forum-2nd-gen-discussion/16804-i2-cylinder-deactivation-behaviors-analysis-2.html

At those speeds (60-70mph), the car does not go in EV... or at least, I've never seen it do myself. However, it is possible to reduce the fuel injection to the minimum and let the inertia max out the physics. On a SGII, at those speeds, it’s fairly easy to bring it between 85 and 90mpg, while MID shows full bars (100mpg), if you are on a flat road or slight downhill. It’s a 1.3L engine, and several components have been optimized for fuel efficiency (piston shape, bearings, using low friction oil, etc) so high mpg is easier to obtain than several other cars out there.

The EV mode is still possible, mostly if you are between 20 and 40mph, done with the same trick you describe: release the accel pedal and re-apply a very slight pressure. You will see the assist needle move up a little up. If you switch to the electric/ICE usage screen on the MID, you will see it only consume electricity (for less than a mile). But from my experience, it’s only possible to use this EV mode to maintain the car speed, or go for a fairly long coasting in which the car decelerate very slowly. Not to accelerate. Doing this does max out the mpgs, but don’t forget you still carry the whole ICE engine with it as it does not decouple, so not the most efficient EV car…
 

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Compliments to Purplegate for very through and well written reply.

Another little high mpg trick I like to use, is when on flat terrain I like to flip to the battery or "energy flow" screen. When there, I try to drive without any arrows flowing in or out of the battery. I think of it as a "free wheeling" phase. When arrow points out of the battery, energy is being used which will have to be replaced later, in a battery regen phase. When arrow points in to the battery, more gasoline is being used due to increased tire roll resistence - from battery charging. This way I'm using the least amount of gasoline to maintain speed for several miles, and do not have to worry about gas eating battery recharging later on.

I like to use battery only to get maximum mpg. So I plan the portions of my trip where I can use ev mode, and where I can make use of a downgrade, braking for a stop sign, or whatever to recharge the battery.

So I think those (like Purplegate) who get top mpg are likely doing some variation of the above "battery management", in addition to higher tire pressures (to decrease tire roll resistence).
 

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What kind of tire pressure do you guys recommend for the best MPG? I am new to the Insight and have been playing around with different driving styles trying to get the best MPG, but my problem is a short drive to work each day (if you want to call it a problem) 5 miles each way. I seen to "lose" about 2.5 MPG on the gauge in the morning drive to work with a few steep hills and "gain" back about 2.8 MPG on the way home. I do a lot better on mileage on the weekends when I can drive many more miles. I used to keep my tire pressure at 40 lbs on my old Toyota Echo with a 5 speed and was able to get 49 MPG on the highway. Thoughts or hints to increase my MPG?


2011 Insight Base, Crimson Pearl
 

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What kind of tire pressure do you guys recommend for the best MPG?
There are several long and detailed threads on this. Generally the higher the better. Some go to the max pressure on the side wall. Some even higher. Many are at 40 psi. I have decreased to 38 psi because I like to quickly and easily change lanes on the freeway when needed in the 65 -75 mph range. With the tires at 40 the steering was so light I was in continual fear of over steering and rolling the car over. Secondly with 25+ mph cross winds it became too much effort to hold the car in a straight line. With the reduction to 38 psi the above problems went away.

I am new to the Insight and have been playing around with different driving styles trying to get the best MPG, but my problem is a short drive to work each day (if you want to call it a problem) 5 miles each way. I seen to "lose" about 2.5 MPG on the gauge in the morning drive to work with a few steep hills and "gain" back about 2.8 MPG on the way home. I do a lot better on mileage on the weekends when I can drive many more miles. I used to keep my tire pressure at 40 lbs on my old Toyota Echo with a 5 speed and was able to get 49 MPG on the highway. Thoughts or hints to increase my MPG?
In general I've had the same experience as you describe above. Recommended tire pressures are 33 psi (all around). I put 36 all around my 3rd day of ownership and got 46 mpg with my first tankfull. I've done alot of reading here as well as my own experimentation. 55.3 mpg is my best tank full. 66.9 mpg (on the MID) is a personal best for around 60 miles of dedicated top mpg effort. 50.1 is my overall mpg for nearly two years of operation in this hilly and often wet, windy, chilly coastal climate.
 

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Wow, 55 MPG for a tank is great! I will start off at 36-37 psi and see how that helps the mileage and see if it affects the ride very much. I hope to at least average 50 MPG after I get used to driving the car. I did noticed the mileage is greatly affected by cold temps as well, can not wait till it gets warm and stays there here in upstate NY.
 

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... I hope to at least average 50 MPG after I get used to driving the car...
Not that I want to make it tough on you right up-front, but it might require some good hypermiling techniques to be in the 50's with your commute. One problem amongst other is the engine temperature. The I2 engine needs to be hot to creep up mpgs. The temp light (the blue one in your dashboard) will turn off at 125F, but still, the engine will not deliver high mpgs before it reach around 160F (measured with a SGII). It’s operating temps is between 178 and 184F. You need roughly a mile to get it to 160F. So one fifth of your commute is done with the engine “cold”. I don’t say it will be impossible for you to be in the 50’s, but you might need to work a bit harder with hypermiling techniques to get there.

To give you an idea, I have to go to 2 offices for my work. The first one is about 7 miles and I get about 50-51 mpg . It’s city driving (lights and 40mph roads). The second office is 28 miles away, highway driving. I get 60mpg in summer (53-54 in winter). I did recently changed the roads I take to get there, falling back on a long 45mph speed limit road with timed light. I believe I’ll creep out some more mpgs.

So my advice, for high mpgs, look for roads without traffic lights and use some pulse and glide techniques.

Oh…. Also, my tires are at 48psi.

Good luck and keep us posted on progress :)
 

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,,,I did noticed the mileage is greatly affected by cold temps as well.....
When the cold light is on, sometimes I'l accelerate from a standing start in "S", at a max. of 2300 rpm, to a speed of nearly 30 mph then shift to "D". Seems to warm the engine a little faster.

When sitting at a traffic light with the cold light on and the engine at fast idle, I've noticed that the mpg gauge goes down at a slower rate if the shifter is in "N".

If I can get the timeing right, I've noticed I can pick up a little speed on a slight down grade with the cold light on, engine at fast idle, foot off of the gas pedal, and mpg gauge at 100! It only lasts till the engine warms, but it does get the mpg gauge off to a great start for the day.....this is more fun then max-ing out the corners on a winding road :) :)

You might consider posting your mpg at Fuelly | Share and Compare Real World MPG . I've detailed my experiences and experiments in the "Notes" at Blue Bird (Honda Insight) | Fuelly
 

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Thanks MovieMike and Purplegate for the great tips, I am looking forward to playing around with the car as the weather warms up to get the best possible mileage. I will add air to my tires this weekend but not sure about going to 48 PSI. That seems a bit high. How is the ride with the pressure that high? I did notice as you said as the engine gets warm it makes a big difference in the mileage. I did sign up at fuelly and will start tracking my mileage there so people can compare to what they are getting.
 
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