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E-85 (85% ethanol) is still big here in the upper Mid-West. I realize it is not the ultimate solution to our dependence on foreign oil.

I'm just wondering IF it is possible and/or practical to do a flex-fuel conversion on the I2?

I assume the I2 runs just fine on what I call E-10, but with a slight reduction in mpg. We also have some "Blender Pumps" around here that will give you E-30. I'm guessing use of E-30 is NOT recommended by Honda Corp.

I don't want this thread to turn into a discussion of whether ethanol is good or bad. Instead, I'd like to hear how it could (or should not) be used in the I2.
 

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I would imagine that any vehicle will run on any varity of fuel if the "trim" range of the system is sufficient to handle the changing fuel. If it starts and runs ok and does not throw a "MIL" code it's ok whether it is approved or not. Give it a try and report back (start with an empty tank and put in a couple of gallons.) if no good just fill the tank an move on :D
 

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I doubt that Honda designed all the components to be E-85 safe. Depending on what materials they use for connectors, hoses, etc...you could cause real damage by using a high-ethanol content mixture.
 

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E85

If you are mainly interested in saving fossil fuels and pollution, you may want to see if you can do the conversion. I think you can do it on any car, but have no actual experience.

If you bought this car to save fuel/money, don't bother. Even E10 will reduce your mpg's about in line with the small savings compared to 100% gas. E85 compared to 100% gas- Your savings will be almost be perfectly eliminated by large losses in mpg. Plus you have to pay for a conversion kit. Plus you will be adding wear and tear on your car from the more corrosive ethanol.
 

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in the insight manual it states nothing over e10 if i recall correctly. If you want to run anything higher than that it is possible with some "tools". you need to inject more e85 per cycle than gasoline because e85 puts out less heat. To do this the ecu's injector duty cycle needs to be modified and you could need larger injectors if the duty cycle is too high. you may also need a larger fuel pump to keep up demand. Basicly in the end you are going to need a 30% larger fuel system and you are going to lose 30% mpgs. It also gets more complex due to different blends in the winter versus summer and there are gas tank mounted sensors in flex fuel cars/trucks so the ecu can determine the blend of ethanol in the tank and adjust the fuelling programs as necessary. happy hunting.
 

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You wouldn't need a different fuel pump but the car is going to run with less power and less efficiency since it isn't designed to run on a fuel of such high octane or low energy. I don't see any reason of why you would want to run it as it will only increase your fuel usage resulting in more trips to fill the tank because of the lower MPG, it will cost you more even though the price per gallon is less and there are no positive evironmental benefits and it is produced and distributed under heavy tax subsidy thanks to the corn lobby. I see no actual benefit to this at all.
 

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If your goal is cost saving, I'd be looking for some crazy person who'd be willing to design a CNG conversion for the Insight. Sure CNG fueling stations charge about $0.90 cheaper/gallon (and the mileage is close to comparable), but if you install a CNG pump in your house (sunk in cost of approximately $6k), you can get it for (at least in Chicagoland NG rates) approximately $0.70/gal.

To put that in perspective, if you used a CNG pump installed at your house, at about 1965 miles, you'll have broken even.

Granted, CNG is still a relatively unproven fuel source, it's something worth mentioning. Of course, CNG is still a fossil fuel...
 
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