Honda Insight Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Having the car for over a month, i find it very unstable on the highway also very sensetive to wind, having problem keeping a straight line.
My tires are Toyo 800 ultra 175-65-14 at 44psi all around.
Do you guy's have this behaviour, how do you correct?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Just read about " Tramlining" witch is what i also experience,
I also notice that some have 185-60-14 tires and this as reduce the tramlining and as improve comfort and performance.
Should i keep my 175-65-14 or exange them for 185-65-14 ???
Will i see a major difference, improvement....MPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Normand,

I would definitely recommend against going to a 185-65R14 tire as it would be severely oversized. Your 175-65R14 is already oversized and the larger tire would be even worse. A 185-60R14 would be a better choice. The best fit is a 195-55R14 as it is exactly the same size as the stock 165-65R14.

If you're having bad stability issues I'd recommend having your alignment checked. Remember though that the Insight is very small and lightweight, as such it will be more susceptible to road surface variations and wind than most other cars.

Later,

Matt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
700 Posts
Regarding 185/65 vws 185/60: "Severely oversized" may be a little extreme, in that we are talking less than a centimeter of diameter. And remember, not all tires of the same "size" have actually the same measurements. Check the RPM/mile numbers for different tires (tirerack.com has good spec sheets).

I do agree that 185/60 would be a better fit, but I also think 185/65 would work if necessary.

Have I picked enough nits?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Alright, so its not "severe", but it is almost 5% larger than stock, which will offset the speedometer by almost 3MPH at 60MPH (Speedo will say 60 and you're actually going 63). I suppose severe is a relative term, but 5% is too much for the Insight if you ask me. It takes more power to turn larger tires, something the Insight doesn't have any of to spare.

The 185/60 is actually a better size than the 175/65. Personally, if I replace the OEM tires with anything I'll be going to a 195/55 for 2 reasons: 1 - to maintain accuracy of the speedo, 2 - As the Pontiac commercials used to say, "Wider is better."
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
830 Posts
Salut Normand,

I have 185/60R14 at 44 psi. From CanadianTires (Motomaster LXR). It has been a while now and I can say that is improves comfort, handling and braking. They are taller than the oem so the MPH and MPG displayed are not like before.

The MPG have not changed much for me BUT I can say that there is no Lean-Burn anymore. The way I drive, I did not used to get it much so it had not much effect of me (either 1- all city traffic driving or 2- high speed on highway in rare long drives). But if you do get Lean-Burn, you could be dissapointed (add about half a liter per 100km).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
351 Posts
Hi Normand-

I agree with you. The Insight takes more concentration on the driver’s part to keep it in a straight line on the highway than other cars that I have driven. If you are used to a “cruiser” that you can comfortably drive with 2 fingers and a thumb while you carry on a conversation with the folks in the back seat, this car can be rather difficult to adapt to. (Maybe this is why Honda did not give us a back seat! :lol: )

I have found however that my own driving ability has improved over the months as I have gotten used to paying more attention to the road surface. I have been reincorporating techniques I used to use when I rode a motorcycle. On a motorcycle, gravel, oil, rain grooves, diagonal RR tracks, cracks, and potholes can be devastating. One quickly learns to keep one eye on the upcoming pavement.

I also think that my reflexes have adapted more to the car. I have acclimated to the slight over steer tendency, and the (if I am not mistaken) the tighter than is commonly found on larger cars steering ratio. I also keep both hands firmly on the wheel more than I used to. I no longer find the handling as distracting or concerning as I used to.
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Hi Narmand:

___Since the Insight was designed as the ultimate fuel efficiency machine, Honda didn’t want to give an inch to anything. This might help you as well …

LONG-TERM TEST: HONDA INSIGHT
… but another persistent complaint was more serious. The Insight's skinny little Bridgestone Potenza tires (165/65SR-14) didn't do much for straight-line stability, making the car far too sensitive to vagaries such as pavement rain grooves, truck ruts, standing water, and gusty winds. "Very twitchy on the highway," commented one chronicler. "This car demands more attention to drive than most."

This trait was aggravated by the addition of a set of Bridgestone Blizzak snow tires. We have high respect for Blizzaks, but in this application they didn't work well in dry conditions. In fact, one logbook note flatly stated that the winter tires "ruin the car. It's virtually undrivable on the freeway on these big, tall, wobbly tire-tread blocks."

We began to suspect there might be more to the Insight's rather touchy behavior than just the tires and decided to check the toe settings. The theory, set forth by Squire Csere, was that with mpg as a be-all, end-all priority, Honda probably selected toe specs to augment same. And so it proved to be. Insights are delivered with zero toe at the front, minimizing rolling resistance but exaggerating the car's response to pavement irregularities and the other variables listed above. We experimented with a little front toe-in—just an eighth of an inch—and found that it had a profound effect on fuel economy, which deflated from 68.6 mpg to 63.2 at a steady-state 60 mph (these data were excluded from the official mileage tally). However, we did note improved turn-in and marginally better straight-line stability. Major improvements are hampered by the narrower rear track, which maximizes the likelihood that at least one of the four tires is riding on a poor section of pavement.
___I will take the hyper handling drive for maximum fuel economy any day vs. the fuel economy loss by adjusting TOE even a fraction of an inch any day of the week myself but you may not? After a few thousand miles, any Insight instability will be controlled without a thought although you still have to pay attention more in one then any other car I have ever driven. For reasons other then just its handling of course ;)

___Good Luck

___Wayne R. Gerdes
___Hunt Club Farms Landscaping Ltd.
___[email:2i1gkim6][email protected][/email:2i1gkim6]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
700 Posts
Annnddd...

I have also found that if you don't fight all the slight pulls, from the road, wind, or whatever, the car generally still tracks pretty straight. Just let up a little on the grip, and see what happens.

I do keep both hands on the wheel most of the time, tho....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
891 Posts
Holicow is right. Most of the grooves that cause tramlining are longitudinal, i.e., generally going the same direction down the highway as your car. If the groove doesn't swerve off the road, it is unlikely to make your car do that :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Normand said:
Just read about " Tramlining" witch is what i also experience,
I also notice that some have 185-60-14 tires and this as reduce the tramlining and as improve comfort and performance.
Should i keep my 175-65-14 or exange them for 185-65-14 ???
Will i see a major difference, improvement....MPG
I meant 185-60-14 as 185-65-14 is to big. Would there be a major improvement going from 175-65-14 to 185-60-14.

As stated, yes this car demands more attention on the road especially when you come from a Audi A4(my previous car).

This car puts a smile on my face, everytime i get to open the door and sit in this car, there is a tune that keep poping into my head: the batman little tune that was playing when batman was getting in his car,
yes you may laugh as i do to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,819 Posts
I think it's all what you're used to. I've always driven small cars, many that'd be considered sports cars, from my first Austin-Healey Sprite to the CRX I had before the Insight (and with a good few motorcycles too). The Insight is, if anything, just a bit less responsive than I'd really like.

So-called "normal" cars feel like they've been dipped in molasses to me. Even my Toyota pickup: I can turn the wheel 10 degrees or more before there's any response...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
351 Posts
All true... I think the worst grooves are often found between the lanes. Certain angles of approach tend to hang up the front end just long enough for the back end to get sucked into the crack/ridge, making the front end try to hop back out of the crack on the same side it went in on. Y’don’t want these kind of things to happen more than once to you. 8)
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top