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Does anyone have a list of states in which you can drive an Insight in a HOV lane? I know California is one, but are there any others?

Just curious.........I live in Texas and don't believe you can here.

Thanks for any info.
 

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HOV lanes in Oregon

Officially I haven't been able to find anything through the Oregon DMV web site, but after talking to several people at the DMV and several OSP and Portland Police officers they said that insights & priuses wouldn't be pulled over for being in HOV lanes. I park in my companies carpool spots with permission, but still hesitate to drive in the HOV lanes since its still not written in stone anywhere. Not exactly helpful, but it's something.
 

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Louis, actually that's not entirely correct. They decided to allow the first 10,000 hybrids on a pilot program. True dedicated alternative fuel cars get to keep their alternative fuel plates (the ones that start with AF-XXXX), it's the bi-fuel vehicles that are getting the boot!

For those who don't know the legacy left behind, AZ in 2001 started with some well intentioned legislation that would encourage the use of alternative fuel vehicles, but through a little pork barrel legislation they ended up with a tax credit that would give you a 50% discount on a Cadillac Escalade so long as it could run on an alternative fuel. We ended up with a ton of bi-fuel gas/propane trucks and SUV's, most with small propane or cng tanks that were never used. They also got the special alternative fuel license plates which allowed them single occupant HOV lane use.

The thing about it was the fed rules never really permitted these vehicles single occupant HOV lane use so we were going outside the federal rules and my understand is the were starting to threaten to pull federal highway funding from us. What the fed rules say are basically you have to have a dedicated alternative fueled vehicle that meets such an emissions rating (which currently is only the Honda Civic GX) or a Tier 2 Bin 5 hybrid getting at least 45 EPA highway MPG. None of those trucks met the rating, nor were they dedicated alternative fueled for the most part (there were some). All the new rules are doing is bringing the state in compliance with the federal rules.

Believe me when I say I read every word of the new rules as I also have electric vehicles and they are being left alone. They gave 90 days to boot the dual-fuel vehicles from the diamond lanes, and that is starting to approach soon. They're supposed to issue some different bi-fuel plates to those existing vehicles soon, but I haven't seen the design.

I just hope we don't get any animosity from the bi-fuel vehicle drivers when they have their plates pulled.
 

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Rick

Sounds like you have a accurate source of information. I got my information from the news paper. They said there were 9000 hybrids that qualify for the HOV plate and that they were kicking out 10000 alt fuel cars. Seems like plenty of room for animosity. I see the HOV lanes in my area filled to about 40% and would like to see it filled to 60 -70% to relieve the congestion in all the lanes. I have not got a blue plate for my Insight because I'm such a hypermiler I seek out the slowest lanes to keep my mileage up. Some of the drivers in the HOV lane think it is a high speed (no limit) lane and my MPG always falls off when I'm over there. But now with the bifuel cars out of there, I feel obligated to get a blue plate and do my part to relieve the congestion. It is good to get the cheaters out of there, but it would be better to have it more full.....Louis
 

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Yep, I read that newspaper article also. That's what prompted me to go read the full text of the new law.

As far as using the HOV lane true they do at times move very fast, but I drive during rush hour 3 days a week and I find I'm actually getting better mileage since the HOV lane actually moves rather than creep-stop creep-stop creep-stop. The average speed in the HOV lane is probably less than 55 during this time anyways, probably closer to 45 so it doesn't move that fast really.
 

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If you average in the 50 to 70 MPG range the HOV lane is better for your MPG then the regular lanes, but if you average in the 80 to 100 MPG range then the regular lanes are better if you are willing to work it. The best thing to do is avoid the rush hours all together if you can. I aviod it in the morning by going in early, but am not willing to wait in the afternoon, so only get half a day of lite traffic. Another bad thing about the HOV lane is in the afternoon it is very hard to cross over the 5 lanes to the HOV lane that is bogged down almost as bad as the regular lanes and then you have to do it again to change freeways.....Louis
 

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Here in Missouri we have two types of lanes: Paved and In SEVERE need of repair...

Gotta love those hicks.....

:badgrin:
 
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