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I've got the Honda manual and I have common shop knowledge..
All I need to know is how do I turn the crankshaft? Please only reply if you know how to do this on the Insight. I don't want to mess up.

I've turned crankshafts on older V8 by simply turning the fan or using a ratchet on the crankshaft nut...
 

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cakley said:
I've got the Honda manual and I have common shop knowledge..
All I need to know is how do I turn the crankshaft? Please only reply if you know how to do this on the Insight. I don't want to mess up.

I've turned crankshafts on older V8 by simply turning the fan or using a ratchet on the crankshaft nut...
Well, if your sure your up to the task the crankshaft's the place. Remember to turn _only_ in the clockwise direction. Its a 17mm hex head bolt. And it's a "plastic" range torque bolt. (torque to yield or torque angle). You don't want to accidentally loosen it.

This is also especially important on higher mileage OHC timing chain engines. Turning engines with long well worn timing chains and related hardware (guides and tensioners) the wrong way can cause an earlier than otherwise failure.

I'd recommend review of the procedure on p. 6-12 of the Insight factory service manual. Remember too tight is worse than too loose.

HTH! :)
 

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The trick I did with the old CRX was to put it in gear (usually 2nd or 3rd) , release the parking brake and pull the whole car forward. Don't run over yourself.
 

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flunkysama said:
The trick I did with the old CRX was to put it in gear (usually 2nd or 3rd) , release the parking brake and pull the whole car forward. Don't run over yourself.
This is a great idea - it is how i have done it on all of my cars (VWs, mostly). Just remeber, that even though you don't run the risk of loosening the stretch bolt (or plastic, or TTY, or whatever you want to call it) it is still a good idea to move the engine in the normal direction of rotation, i.e if you are pulling it forward have it in a forward gear, if you are pusing it backwards have it in reverse.

The most common explanation I have heard for this is to avoid putting unusual strain on the timing connector (whether it is a belt or, in our case, a chain). turning them backwards can stretch them or cause a skip.
 
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