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Discussion Starter #1
My driver's side window has always slowed when it's going up, a couple inches before it shuts, but in the past few weeks there have been several times when it's stopped entirely, and I had to drive with 2" of open window for some minutes until I tried again and it closed.

I've looked around here a bit, and it seems like maybe what I need to do is get the "window run channels" greased with Shin Etsu silicon grease. How do I do that? Do I put the grease on the window somewhere and send the window up and down a bit, or do I take the door apart somehow?

If it's going to be too much of a pain in the neck, I'd rather take the car to a shop and have them do it. Would the cost be covered by the Honda warranty?
 

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I believe that has been discused before and the dealer will do that for you without charge.

For those who are looking for a self applied 5 minute solution, I thought I would mention "Parker O ring lube". I have a tube of this silicone based lubricant in the shop. (There are probably other brands as well.) As the name implies it is used to lubricate "O" rings. This material doesn't break down even at extreme temps, doesn't rot rubber and is exceptionally slick. Only the tiniest amount is required. I put a Lady Bug sized drop on a tiny piece of paper towel and ran it around inside the side and top door seal. A lot of dirt came off in the towel. A second pass with another drop on a clean towel left an invisible coating. This is pure, clear, unadulterated silicone grease. You want to use the least amount possible. Don't use it on the bottom rubber seal or your window will get streaked with grease. :!:

Bottom line is it works great. For those who have this in their tool box it is a quick, cheap, durable, effective solution. Dozens of other uses too! 8)

P.S. White silicone grease used for electronics is loaded with heat conducting powder and is not suitable. :!:
 

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I was told when they do this at the dealership they just blow the run channel out with the air hose. The one time I did it I rolled the window down (I hope that part is obvious). Then clean out the run channel the best you can. Take the edge of a towel and run it through once, then again with some sort of all purpose cleaner. I even went in with some q-tips in order to get down into the run channel in the door a little bit. Then with a clean q-tip apply some silicion grease thinly and evenly. Now roll the window up and down a couple of times and it should drag some of it down the run channel with it.

The officially recommended silicon grease is Honda's Shin Etsu silicon grease. Really expensive at about $15 a tube, but it lasts and lasts and lasts. And while your at it you might rub a little silicon grease on your door seals too.
 

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Yes, a little on the door seals will help to prevent icing in the winter. The "O" ring lube wasn't cheap either. I've probably had the tube for 15 or 20 years! great for faucets, bread makers, halogen bulb seals too, but I digress. :oops:
 

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I've had some major problems with window channels. Both required replacement, and fortunately those replacements were covered by the warranty (which has since expired).

My Honda dealer attributed the failures to dust/dirt (no doubt from the highway I commute on, which was under construction for years).
I asked whether it would be appropriate to apply fluoropolymer (Teflon) based spray, and they recommended instead, silicone based spray.

The large can cost about $2 at WalMart, and the application was very simple. Once a year seems adequate.
I've had no problems since. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hm. So, how do I keep the window from being streaked with grease? The silicon spray (which I assume you just spray on the window when it's up?) sounds like it would collect smog and impede visibility over time. b1shmu63's suggestion of putting the grease only on the top seals of the window sounds like it would leave the window with good visibility, but it doesn't sound like it would fix my problem, which happens when the bottom 2-3 inches of the window are still within the door.
 

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slow windows

Hi Madeline,

with the window down, spray the silicone lube in the run channel (the rubber part the window moves up and down in). As stated above, it probably wouldn't hurt to clean the run channel first.
 

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Window Channels

I've had this problem looked at twice by the dealer but it's still happening. Has anyone had to have the door taken apart and the mehanism serviced?
 

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The regulator's do burn up and may need replaced to fix the auto down feature. If you let it get bad enough the run channels will bind up and the window will not seal properly at the top. When this happens the only solution is to replace the window run channels, which is a relatively expensive and time consuming job.

That said, if one really desired last time I had my door panels off, which was only about a week ago, I realized you could remove the plastic sheet and get your arm up in to have access to almost the entire run channel down in the door itself.
 

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Nozzle spray silicone

3M and other companies make an excellent silicone spray that comes with a nozzle tube that inserts into the spray button so you can get the stuff exactly where you need it with no overspray.
After cleaning out the channles where you can reach, start with a heavy application with the glass down inside the door as far down into the channel as the nozzle will reach, then follow up the channel to the top on the front and rear of the glass channels.
This should help, short of replacing channels or regulators.
 
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