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Well, he could have $2,400 in savings if the car he previously drove got 14mpg or so... maybe he had a truck?
 

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Yeah, I'll have to think about that. My conceptualizing is off-the-mark...

You're right, Mario. If OP was driving a vehicle that got 14.4 mpg, the savings would be $2,400, assuming my other assumptions are about right... That'd be 903 gallons versus the Insight's 217...
 

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Hypermiler
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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I don't think the math works, period: 13,000 miles divided by say 60 mpg, equals 217 gallons. 217 X say $3.5/gallon= $760...
Yeah, I should have mentioned I used to drive a pick-up to work @ 15 mpg. My wallet would shed tears.

Very pleased to have an Insight now. My wallet is happier too. :D
 

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I am in the same position. My truck averages 15 mpg, best tank in over 11 years was 19.9 mpg. I am now driving 18k miles a year, the savings is significant. Less than $40 to fill the insight and good for over 600 miles, truck took $100 and was only good for 400 miles.

Just ball parking numbers, truck would cost over $4000 a year in gas, insight maybe $800.
 

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My last car was a subaru legacy, which got 24-27 mpg, which I'll just call 25 mpg, or slightly less than half of what I'm getting in my Insight. The way I look at it, a trip in my Insight takes half the gas, so I would wind up paying double in gas for a given distance, so basically every time I fill up, I just saved an amount of money equal to what I put in the tank. So like today I put in 9.52 gallons, and it cost $35.32. I just saved more than $35.32. Every time I fill up I exclaim something along the lines of "This is freakin' awesome!"

It's pretty easy to do a comparison like that so every time you gas up you can figure out how much you just saved over having driven the same distance in your last car. It's quite gratifying.

I'm hoping my battery lasts a few more years, but even if I had to replace it tomorrow, I know I'd get at least another seven years out of the next one, and my fuel savings would be well over the cost of the battery.
 

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Since purchase of my '01 last may, $2,400 in fuel savings (13,000 + miles). Love it ! :D
(pays for the new pack when the time comes).

..Bob
My car's paid for itself AND the MaxIMA battery in the year and 5 months I've owned it, vs. the LS400 it replaced.
 

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Wonder if you guys factor in the fuel you get with your purchase? I was tickled pink when I got my insght with a full tank and after my first fill up I had almost a thousand miles on the odo. :D
 

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I've owned my insight for coming up on 2 years and 20k miles now. I still have my truck for doing truck things, but it has saved me over $3100 in fuel so far. Still hasen't paid for itself yet, but thats assuming I never sell it. Thats still $3k less in the oil companies pockets.
 

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I guess it was about time I got out my calculator and do some figuring. I've driven my Insight for just over 30K miles so far. If I take what I've saved from not driving my Prius and getting 72 mpg (yes, I hypermiled the crap out of it too :p), I've saved right around $400. If I were to use the car I had before the Prius ('99 Saturn SL2 5MT with it's 50-55 mpg-yep same hypermiling:D), the savings jumps to around $915. Now, if I was able to get what I got on my record tank last year for the whole 30K miles, the savings over my Saturn would be around $1200.
 

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I've had my Insight since May 2001. It has ~176,000 miles, with a lifetime mpg of 62.5. That's 2,816 gallons @ say $2.75 a gallon = $7,744.

Previous car got about 20 mpg... 62.5/20= 3.125 times better mileage with the Insight. $7,744 x 3.125= $24,200...

$24,200-$7,744= $16,456 saved by owning the Insight, not to mention considerably less maintenance. That's less than a grand shy of what I paid for it.:)
 

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Holy ****. I've just worked out how much mine has saved me over the year I've had it. Without going into calculations, I was putting £500 in my X-Trail evey month. I'm now putting £200 in the Insight. (~30mpg - ~70mpg).

I saved £3600 in a year. Or, in your terms $5400. :)
 

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The Insight's my first car, so technically I'm not saving anything. ;) Still fun to fill up the tank for under $40, though!
 

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The Insight's my first car, so technically I'm not saving anything. ;) Still fun to fill up the tank for under $40, though!
Good point. :) Wonder how many people can drive just the wrong vehicle? Granted most of my parents and parent figures drove fuel efficient cars, my uncle had the tacoma and had racked up 40 thousand miles for person transportation with no load. I was buying 36 gallons of preminum fuel to the 1 tank of regular in my insight. I dont know how or why he did it. Still today I see people using trucks, suvs, etc and its just one person. I can see if you have 8 children, but not just one. :confused:
 

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Good point. :) Wonder how many people can drive just the wrong vehicle? Granted most of my parents and parent figures drove fuel efficient cars, my uncle had the tacoma and had racked up 40 thousand miles for person transportation with no load. I was buying 36 gallons of preminum fuel to the 1 tank of regular in my insight. I dont know how or why he did it. Still today I see people using trucks, suvs, etc and its just one person. I can see if you have 8 children, but not just one. :confused:
That baffles me to Cobb. A lot of times, you hear the excuse, "I need my truck/SUV to haul my boat." Then when you ask them how often the haul their boat, they say 4 or 5 times every summer. Or, you'll hear the excuse that they may need to haul extra passengers if their kids have their friends over but then find out it's only a couple of times a month; maybe less. The one that cracks me up the most is, "We're expecting our second child so we have to get an SUV.":rolleyes: Granted, some people actually do use bigger vehicles for their intended purpose a lot however, most people could get by with a lot less vehicle than they think.
 

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Hypermiler
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Discussion Starter #18
I used to spend $350 a month for gas in the truck just to go / from work. Ouch! :mad: Spending about 1/4 of that now. :D

Lovin' my cvt, but if I had known then what I know now about Insight, I'd have an mt.

(maybe I'll save enough to get one ??)

Still have the truck. Haul rock, sand, mulch, soil, my childrens furniture, ...
 

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Yeah, I calculated these savings before I got my Insight. I have a 10 mile commute which takes me 30-60 minutes (let's say average of 45), so 13mph. Half of the trip is stop and go. My old daily driver (400hp v8) idled the entire time and while I could pull 20 city/31 highway, I'd get like 16 in this traffic. I seem to be averaging about 14,000 mile a year in all driving. My v8 car averaged 21mpg most tanks. My Insight is averaging 57mpg.

At $4/gallon this is:
$2700 Old daily driver (at 21mpg)
$982 Insight (at 57mpg)

$1700 in fuel saved a year is not bad. Then these cars need car fewer brake jobs, they seem to hold an alignment forever, they use half the oil per oil change, no alternator to fail, likely to never use the starter, etc. Plus it's easier to park in garages downtown. Most of the items that wear out are pretty minor. The battery is really the only major expense, and those can last quite a long time (100k+ without maintenance, without sitting).

Having a second car, it costs $45/yr for registration and $180/yr for insurance. It's worth having a high economy vehicle to commute in.

Even cars that average 30mpg would cost nearly $2k a year in fuel. A late 90's Saturn I had would do 28 city/40 highway. There are only a handful of vehicles that rival the Insight in yearly expenses. Some get close in economy but cost more in maintenance or payments. Hell, the new electrics with "110empg" cost much more to maintain, and have a very limited range. People with MIMA can drive cheaper than those electrics.
 

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Hell, the new electrics with "110empg" cost much more to maintain, and have a very limited range. People with MIMA can drive cheaper than those electrics.
Having both a 112 mpge pure EV and an Insight, I can state without doubt that the scheduled maintenance on my EV is much less expensive than on my Insight. I'm not aware of any pure EV that is more expensive to maintain than an Insight or any other vehicle with an ICE.

It's too early to tell how repair costs compare, but with many fewer mechanical parts in the drive train, my EV should be very reliable. As with the Insight, the biggest repair cost would be the battery pack. Even though battery pack costs are declining, the larger battery pack of my EV will always cost more to replace than my Insight battery pack. However, I won't have to pay to replace my EV battery pack for at least 8 years whereas I might have to replace my Insight battery pack at any time. My EV won't have any of the repair costs associated with an ICE, transmission, clutch, exhaust system, catalytic converter, etc., etc.

In terms of fuel costs, my Insight, even if it didn't have MIMA, compares well with my EV if both were in Honolulu where gasoline costs are high but electricity costs are even higher, unless I had solar panels to charge my EV. However, the many free public charging stations means that I haven't paid a cent to fuel my EV which makes it a winner hands down :) but free public charging probably won't last forever. If both were in Sweden where my Insight is, the high cost of gasoline and low cost of hydroelectric- and wind-generated electricity would favor my EV.

The current high initial EV cost would mean that it would probably be more expensive to drive than my 13-year-old Insight if the purchase prices of both were amortized into the operating costs.

So outright comparisons are difficult to make in general, but I think your assessment of new EV's is seriously flawed.
 
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