Honda Insight Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
It has come time for me to look into a cvt. my joints and feet are getting bad. there was one in the southern part of the state there is another an 05, but the guy who was selling it for a friend jerked me around; long story, but i knew there was something up. i am up front and i try my best to keep it. i am going to montana in early june and may go to portland ore from there and may even visit my niece in southern cali. it depends on trains and maybe buses.

there is one in mineesota with trans problems. it won't move. i checked at the honda dealer as to costs and they wanted $810 for the fly wheel and 5-6 hours labor on the low end. i got my 01 to run on my own, but i have hoist, jack stand and I am older than dirt. Why is the fly wheel so costly and what is the main cause of failure? not changing the fluid? this could very well be my last car. School me folks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
I have a CVT for my 90 mile daily work commute. It’s a great drive. You can expect about 50 mpg out of it with out Lean Burn.

CVT’s are nearly impossible to rebuild but with care can run just as long as the manual trans.

Most common failure on the CVT is the splines on the flywheel going out. Scott at Jue motors in CA has a better than OEM repair for that.

if you plan to keep a CVT my recommendation is to find a salvaged low mile transmission or complete drive train to have as a spare. Now is the prime time to find these but I’m thinking they will be nearly impossible to find in 10 years.

I have a spare drivetrain with 150,000 miles on it and an additional CVT with 60,000 miles on it. If you find yourself in CA I would be willing to sell you one of my spare CVT’s. I would definitely recommend a trip to Jue motors if you are on the west coast, Scott is a great guy that takes pride in his work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
CVT owner here. I would avoid anything mentioning trans problems if you’re new to them. You won’t actually know what’s up and you won’t be able to get it rebuilt. Look for a low mileage car and pay a premium for it, and it’ll pay for itself that way.

Batteries hold up better with the CVT but you’ll still want to fit a grid charger. Be prepared to do a couple of fluid changes for peace of mind, and think about changing the two internal filters. This is a simple job. Something handy to make up is a blank ODBII connector with pins 4 and 9 soldered together. If you disconnect the 12V for whatever reason, you’ll need to do a little clutch reset procedure which is easier if you’ve made up that connector.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I have a CVT for my 90 mile daily work commute. It’s a great drive. You can expect about 50 mpg out of it with out Lean Burn.

CVT’s are nearly impossible to rebuild but with care can run just as long as the manual trans.

Most common failure on the CVT is the splines on the flywheel going out. Scott at Jue motors in CA has a better than OEM repair for that.

if you plan to keep a CVT my recommendation is to find a salvaged low mile transmission or complete drive train to have as a spare. Now is the prime time to find these but I’m thinking they will be nearly impossible to find in 10 years.

I have a spare drivetrain with 150,000 miles on it and an additional CVT with 60,000 miles on it. If you find yourself in CA I would be willing to sell you one of my spare CVT’s. I would definitely recommend a trip to Jue motors if you are on the west coast, Scott is a great guy that takes pride in his work.
thanks for the input. what is the cause of the failure of the flywheel, Richard?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
CVT owner here. I would avoid anything mentioning trans problems if you’re new to them. You won’t actually know what’s up and you won’t be able to get it rebuilt. Look for a low mileage car and pay a premium for it, and it’ll pay for itself that way.

Batteries hold up better with the CVT but you’ll still want to fit a grid charger. Be prepared to do a couple of fluid changes for peace of mind, and think about changing the two internal filters. This is a simple job. Something handy to make up is a blank ODBII connector with pins 4 and 9 soldered together. If you disconnect the 12V for whatever reason, you’ll need to do a little clutch reset procedure which is easier if you’ve made up that connector.
you seem to have cvt experience with cvt transes. what do you think causes the spines to wear out? so there could be something wrong with the trans besides the flywheel?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
I don’t know what causes the splines to fail. I do know when Scott repairs they are much more robust than OEM.

CVT belt is another failure point as well I believe.

Many things can cause failure.Scott was trying to describe to me why he doesn’t rebuild the CVT. He said the parts index for the 5 speed was 25 pages, for the CVT 250 pages. Just many more moving parts to it, all potential failure points.

There is more preventative maintenance involved with the CVT, it’s easy stuff that anybody can do. If the proper maintenance is done a CVT can easily go 400,000.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,731 Posts
The flywheel failure is mostly due to a lack of grease. The shaft on the transmission is harder than the flywheel. There is a tiny amount of space for the grease and an inadequate O-ring, once there is not enough grease, over time the splines in the flywheel strip.

Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,470 Posts
The transmission is not the problem. The flywheel is. WATCH out for shady dealers trying to sell you a transmission .Then after you get hooked for the transmission they say you need a flywheel too,and really all you need is the flywheel..shady .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
i had a an 05 cvt i i tried to buy twice from two different sellers in a week and it was sold both times. i could not act fast enough; the lack of grease was a problem with all first gen cvts?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,012 Posts
It isn't as much of a problem as you're making it out to be. It happens to a few cars, but most don't have a problem. If you want a CVT, buy one. Don't worry about it. I'm not losing any sleep over my wife's CVT.

Sam
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
740 Posts
Been there...done that. It can be a pretty good deal. And there are some techniques to gain a little confidence that the flywheel is the problem. It can be $100 to $200 (and up if you want a new flywheel). Then there's 2 to 20 hours of labor...depending on skills.

b

PS...the grease thing is actually a design flaw (IMHO)...the grease in the splines WILL eventually disappear...just a matter of time and miles...It should actually be an $800 item on the maintenance schedule at about 150K miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
The carrier bearing on the main shaft failed I made all the tools to dissemble but the bearing is a custom unit and not available, I could have one fabricated but found two spare Transmissions. first one had 112,000 on it and now has 200,000 more no issues. While the pan is off pull the magnets and clean them off as well. use a new paper gasket and no sealant.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top