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Hi

I Have a 2000 Japanese CVT insight that is currently off the road waiting for parts.(I've never driven it yet)
How do i tell if it has Lean Burn?
How do you tell when you are in Lean burn is there a light on the dash?

Cheers
Steve
 

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To the best of my knowledge, there are no Insight with a CVT tranmission that has Lean Burn. Sorry bout that. Only the 5 speed has it.

When the lean burn kick in, the MPG gauge goes from 50 ish to 75 ish. Also, you feel it comming out of learn burn to purge the NOx cat, as the engine gains power from the richer mixture (and MPG does down). This last a few seconds and is cycling every once in a while
 
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Hi Bluebug:

___The Japanese CVT’s did have Leanburn. Whether or not yours does remains to be seen? There is no light to tell you lean burn has been invoked, just a slight change in acceleration and the Instantaneous makes a nice 20 – 30 mpg jump. When entering NOx purge, you will feel a slight acceleration and see the Instantaneous fall by 20 – 30 mpg. These rise and fall numbers are based off the 5-speed so you might see just 15 - 20 mpg in a leanburn based CVT?

___By the way, how did you procure such a unique JDM Insight anyway?

___Good Luck

___Wayne R. Gerdes
___Hunt Club Farms Landscaping Ltd.
___[email:1irp39vs][email protected][/email:1irp39vs]
 

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Technique for 10% mileage increase with CVT

After driving my CVT for about 20k miles and observing how it responds to varying road conditions, I started practicing the following technique to obtain a 10% or better increase in mileage.

Following a change in the road grade, a minor movement of the throttle position causes the instantaneous mileage to increase by a significant amount. The increase in particularly noticeable when the road grade changes from level to slight downhill, or slight incline to level. As an example of actual results obtained, the mileage for a 500 mile run of combined city and highway driving increases from 48 to 53 mpg with this technique.

To use the technique, pump the accelerator pedal twice with very small movements, about 2mm each time. It seems that doing this in combination with a road grade change causes the system to re-calculate certain parameters related to fuel economy. The effect is a sudden jump in mileage, consistent with the lean-burn increase as reported by manual transmission owners.
 

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Technique for 10% mileage increase with CVT

I use a similar technique. It improves mpg on inclines by slightly increasing power in lean-burn mode. I basically "double-click" the accelerator by pushing in about halfway then letting off until lean burn is achieved then pressing back in until instantaneous reads about 75 mpg. I then coast with load up the hill, but lose speed slower than otherwise. I have a 5-speed, BTW.
 

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Nope, all have 2 cat's. I had figured on the same thing, but I laid down and looked under a CVT Insight and it has the NOX converter too. If it's a US car and it has the SULEV sticker on the drivers side quarter window it would deffinitely not have lean burn, as far as the rest of the world I really don't know how you'd tell without driving the car.
 

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Re: Technique for 10% mileage increase with CVT

ncnightowl said:
I use a similar technique. It improves mpg on inclines by slightly increasing power in lean-burn mode. I basically "double-click" the accelerator by pushing in about halfway then letting off until lean burn is achieved then pressing back in until instantaneous reads about 75 mpg. I then coast with load up the hill, but lose speed slower than otherwise. I have a 5-speed, BTW.
I drive an HCH with CVT and have discovered somthing that sounds vaguely similar to that, as well. When driving over rolling hills on the freeway, I'll pick up speed going down, then on the way back up, allow myself to coast back up the other side until I lose around 10-15mph in speed, then I will rapidly press the accelerator one or two times until I feel the IMA kick in. Once this happens, I will gradually back off until I'm at the lightest throttle level with the IMA still engaged, and it will pull me over the crest of the hill. I do the same any time I want to accelerate, I will do a quick "assisted" boost until I'm just a bit over my target speed, then quickly back off. I usually find that by enganging the motor assist, I pull a bit over 40mpg instantaneous uphill at highway speeds, whereas before I'd usually get considerably under 40mpg cresting hills with just the ICE by very gradually applying more throttle.
 
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