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I just purchased a 2002 CVT Insight which had a lifetime average of 42 mpg. After a tank of gas (and, I believe, superior fuel economy driving techinques) I got 48 mpg. This, however, is still extremely low considering the environmental/driving conditions (temperature, hills, etc.). I have been following the threads in this forum about EGR valve malfunction to see if that is a good place to begin troubleshooting, but I don't have any of the accompanying bucking and rough ride that peple are describing. I would greatly appreciate any helpful hints from anyone on where to begin investigating this problem. By the way, the the trip gauge exactly matches my actual calculation of amount of gas put in the tank divided by the trip miles.
THANKS!!! :(
 

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No! If you don't have bucking and jumping, then don't start at the egr.
Have you read about:
1-tire pressure
2-warm air intake
3-radiator block
and several other tricks?
Tire pressure seems to be a VERY good place to start.
 

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I agree with LoNOx. If your up north in the cold, you would benefit with a warm air intake or partially blocking the radiator. Are the tires stock? What pressure...stock tires can run a few psi over recommended and still wear fine.
 

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thanks LoNOx1 and kapps

Thanks for the suggestions. My tires are the recommended Bridgestone RE92s inflated to 40 psi. Although I'm 'up north' in CT, it has been unusually warm - lakes haven't frozen yet (Dec 31) - barely dipping to freezing at night. Since we have a 20 mpg difference in gas mileage (from your post) don't you think that there's something more substantially wrong than a radiator block or warm intake can fix?
 

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Well, I have a 5 spd, not a cvt. That's good for at least 10mpg to begin with since cvt's don't have lean burn capabilities. Even with temperatures being moderate (for you), the Insight really starts taking a hit to mileage once temps get below 50 or so. I've actually seen my temp gauge fall while driving at too low an rpm :shock: . Also, what type of driving are you doing (ie. city, highway, how long...can the engine get up to temperature)? You not going to get very good mileage until everything's completely warm.

I'd definitelty recommend looking into the radiator block (but be careful) and warm air intake. they should help the engine get up to temperature quicker and stay there in very cold temperatures.
 

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Tire pressure makes a HUGE difference. Mine was at 44 when I bought it. After reading the numerous testimonies of performance, I increased mine to 60 psi. I put a new set of tires on a couple of months ago, and the old set lasted 52000 miles at 60psi. Inflate at higher pressures at your own risk, but I believe you will see an instant increase. 48mpg is a very respectable number for a new owner in a northern state. Don't be too impatient. As you've probably heard all of your life, "Practice makes perfect." Do you have any type of OBD reader to monitor intake air and engine temps?
 

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City driving is the biggest factor of all. Every time you stop and start the car just sucks down the gas. (Relatively speaking.) So the very first thing to do is try a run of 100 miles or so at 50 MPH with no stops.

I run at 44 PSI and get good results (71 lifetime, 5 speed). Tire pressure indeed makes a big difference, but ambient temperature is probably even more significant. In August, on a calm 90 degree day, the car just goes on forever. In December, on a blustery 20 degree day, I struggle to stay above 60 MPG.

If you don't have any codes, my suggestion would be to work on tuning your driving technique and wait until summer before deciding there's something wrong.
 

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My former '04 Insight was traded off by it's first owner becuse of poor mileage. (His lifetime average was 39!) When I got it home and checked it out, aside from needing a major service which had been neglected, it had about 30 lbs in the tires, which were completely ruined, edge wear from being under inflated. A quick call to tire rack got me 4 new tires. I ran them consistently at 44 front, 40 rear. Mileage immediately jumped up into the 60s and remained there for the next 12k miles until I traded it off on an '07 Civic Hybrid. Honda only calls for 32 lb pressures f&r on the Civic hybrid. We're going to bump this up into the high 30s and see how the ride quality vs milage works out. This is a completely different kind of car so we're not expecting a major jump in mileage, but it will be intersting to see how it responds. Oh, the Civic has been getting an average 47 mpg in very cold weather here. Got 52 on a run to Santa Fe and back when it was virtually brand new.
 
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