Honda Insight Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi!

I recently needed to replace my two rear tires and the shop talked me out of the OEMs (priced at $175/tire) into a size that is slightly larger.

Suddenly, my mileage has plummeted (see above)! Is this due to the non-OEMs? And, if so, is there a good alternative that isn't quite as expensive?

Many thanks,

Amanda
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,918 Posts
If nothing else changed, then I would say it is highly likely.

Also, since when are RE92s $175 each? I guess I need to keep up with the times, we just sold our last set for $90/tire.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
$175 should be the price for 2, not 1.

Never use another tire besides OEM, unless you want a decent MPG hit. Going larger only exaggerates the problem.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,692 Posts
Yep. That's the way it works RE-92s in the correct size or lose MPG. Take them back. He just sold you what he had without regard for the consequences. Lack of knowledge probably also played into it.

Sam
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Yep. That's the way it works RE-92s in the correct size or lose MPG. Take them back. He just sold you what he had without regard for the consequences. Lack of knowledge probably also played into it.

Sam
RE-92s are NOT a size. A size is some numbers like: 185/70-15. The first number is the tread width in centimeters, the second number is a measure of the sidewall height, and the third number is the rim size in inches. It is highly unlikely that tires on the rear would change the mpg that much. It was once common for people to brag about the mpg of their car by saying they drove to the beach with only half a tank of gas and when they got back they still had a quarter tank of gas. Nowadays people have to be more scientific than that. Even if you measure the gas by filling up, driving, and then filling up again, (the gas replaced is the gas you burned while driving) there are so many factors that might explain the actual gas used. For example, was it all the same kind of driving? Or are you comparing freeway miles to city miles? Daylight driving vs. night driving, etc.
If you really lost 10 mpg, I say prove it!
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,918 Posts
:unsure:

Sam is well aware of what tire size is.

Have you ever driven an Insight with the wrong tires on it? I say you prove that Amanda's new tires didn't lower her fuel economy by 10MPG.

They're probably also only inflated to ~33PSI. That'll do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
If they are in fact larger and you're running them on the front, your odometer is going to be off and that will throw off your MPG as well.

I run OEM sized Michelin Energy Savers at 45-50 psi and am averaging 64 mpg with my Insight. I also have 2 sets of Dunlop Enesaves and I also run them at 45-50 psi, but I haven't run them much...just this past winter because the Michelin's were horrible in the snow. The Dunlops were much better in the snow. The only reason I'm using these are because the Michelins came on the car when I bought it and the tread is still good and I found 2 sets of the Dunlops which were nearly brand new when I pulled them off junkyard Insights and the rims were in good shape as well.

I would at the very least pump up the pressure and ensure the larger tires are on the rear so your front tires are OEM size and make your odometer read properly and re-evaluate for MPG.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,263 Posts
I have bridgestone ecopias and I get over 60 idk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
I am pretty strict about keeping mileage figures for my cars. I bought my 2001 Insight in 2018 in the early spring. It came with Michelin tires. I was getting an average of the mid-fifties of miles per gallon. I switched to Bridgestone in July of 2018. My MPG jumped from the mid-fifties to the mid-sixties. I run the tire pressure at the Honda recommended tire pressure. My driving style did not change. And I am still getting this mileage over a year later.

That being said I believe I will switch to Vredsteins which are reported on this board to return the same MPG, have better tread life and better traction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,400 Posts
I am pretty strict about keeping mileage figures for my cars. I bought my 2001 Insight in 2018 in the early spring. It came with Michelin tires. I was getting an average of the mid-fifties of miles per gallon. I switched to Bridgestone in July of 2018. My MPG jumped from the mid-fifties to the mid-sixties. I run the tire pressure at the Honda recommended tire pressure. My driving style did not change. And I am still getting this mileage over a year later.

That being said I believe I will switch to Vredsteins which are reported on this board to return the same MPG, have better tread life and better traction.
I can't speak for mileage with Vredsteins since I swapped my engine at the same time, but I was amazed at just how soft and squishy they were. It's like riding on rubber balloons now.

My best tank with my 2.4L engine so far has been just over 65mpg, but I have no basis for comparison.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
I am still burning off tread on a set of uniroyal 175/14’s and boy do they suck, they are worse than the Continental LRR 185/60’s that came with my first Insight

Loud like snows, poor handling and heavy, mpgs are down in the mid 50’s(terrible) they are weather checked so I’m hoping to get rid of them and back to re92’s soon, sadly they do work well as snow tires

So don’t let anyone say tires don’t matter much, the old Insight had only 2 re92’s on the front and I could hit in the low 80’s mpg wise, substitute something else and you could feel it on the highway in the form of earlier downshifts
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,039 Posts
RE-92s are NOT a size. A size is some numbers like: 185/70-15. The first number is the tread width in centimeters, the second number is a measure of the sidewall height, and the third number is the rim size in inches.
24 hours and no reply from Rainsux? Has he fallen ill?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
O.K., I'm a newbie. I should probably apologize to Rainsux. He did write: "in the correct size." The RE 92 is actually the Bridgestone Potenza, standard tire that came with the Honda Insight. I love tires, and I know they make a big difference in how a car performs, including gas mileage. Amanda did say that the tires were installed in the REAR, but she did not say if they were Highway tread or Mudders. BTW, the Bridgeport website lists the RE 92 as $108.99 and that does make the $175 price a bit of a gouge. Did you know that it takes about a barrel of oil to make a single tire? More manufacturers are making Low Rolling Resistance tires and there are more options than ever to buy a tire that rolls well and still maintains good handling, braking in wet and dry, and generate good cornering Gs. As a tire rolls it creates a "standing wave" that deflects the tire's sidewall. Underinflated tires can heat up so much that the sidewall can be destroyed. Since tires can lose air over time, inflating them a bit extra makes sense. 40 to 50 psi is fine, but I still think that 60 psi is extreme and may affect the way a tire brakes at speed, It may also make the ride a bit more jarring over irregular surfaces. Anyone ever use aero mods to increase mpg on the freeway?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,692 Posts
I've been on the way home from InsightFest. I'm not going to do much of a reply since the OP apologized.

But there are probably a million threads with all of this information..All it would take would be a Search to find more information on RE-92s than you can handle. Someone who loves tires should do a lot of reading and learn how it really works.

Aero mods is a subject for another thread.

Sam
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I know a lot about tires, because I race, and test race cars (mostly Porsches) professionally. I've only used the RE92s on my '00 Insight since I bought it new, I see no reason to use anything else than the tire that was actually designed specifically for the car. They're available at Tire Rack for $99.40 each.
One comment about over inflating your tires to get better mileage. One thing I've learned about cars for the street or the racetrack, is you're always compromising to get the best out of any car, whether it's speed or gas mileage, or even safety. A car rides on the road with what's called contact patches - that's the little patches of rubber that meet the road. That's all there is to keep you hooked to the tarmac. By over inflating your tires, you may get better mileage, but you're also making those patches smaller - and If you're inflating the tires to 45-50psi or more, you're making them a lot smaller. And these are tires that are only 165mm wide, and hard as rocks for less rolling resistance to begin with. One thing to remember is that technically, it's not the brakes that stop your car... it's the tires. The brakes slow the wheels' rotation, but it's the tires' friction/grip on the road that actually stops the car. So it's a trade off - you can get better mileage with 45-50 psi in the tires, but you will lessen your grip, and the car will not respond as well when turning or braking, especially if you find yourself in an emergency situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Thanks, Beez, your comments are well considered! It is interesting that you drive Porsche race cars! You probably know about hanging the rearend out in the corners (like famous Porsche
Driver, Walter Roehrl!, drift master) so that you can gun it for the straightaways! Rear engine allows for late braking in the approach to the corners, and with weight transfer, the front wheels share in the load.)
Of course, Front Wheel Drive is another story. When I was younger I drove a 50 mpg car from Honda. It was called the Honda 600! The driving style was to create a power slide from the understeer and then correct with driving input for slip angles. Never let up on the gaas, however, or the rearend will come around---fast!
It was a two cylinder motor with 36 cubic inches! Back then gas was so cheap that I drove foot to the floor all the time and could still get 42 mpg. Tires? 10 inchers and only 145 cm of tread.. So, those folks who think the Insight is so fantastic should check out the Honda 600! No hybrid battery to worry about.
Compared to my poor man's Porsche, the original VW Bug, the Honda had significant improvements in the 1.) unitized body, and 2.) the weather- protected electrical wiring.
All I was really trying to say about the 10 mile per gallon drop is that fuel economy is a dynamic process and it might be more than just the tires that caused the loss of mpg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Results here are fairly consistent with my CVT between tyre brands. When first I got it, it had some very noisy cheap Chinese ditchfinders. I swapped them to a quieter premium Bridgestone (though not the RE92, we can't get that in the UK). I saw about a 7.5mpg (UK gallon) improvement in fuel consumption.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,683 Posts
Markleon:
Please include your Location in your Profile, as ALLG1 Insighters have done.
Thank You
Willie
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
About this Discussion
18 Replies
14 Participants
Willie Williford
Honda Insight Forum
We’re the ultimate Honda Insight forum to talk about Honda’s hybrid car and its fuel economy and specs!
Full Forum Listing
Top