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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I grant this might be a bit off the mark even for this section but, hey, FWIW...

Yesterday I "celebrated" the installation of a brand new upstream O2 sensor (and the potential recovery of some MPG by virtue of no longer running rich) by driving directly to the gas station and topping up so that I could zero-out my Trip A reading and see how I do on the next take (compared to all previous since the P0134 code). So, in essence, the MPG from that point was more or less an "instantaneous* read.

Our home is 2 miles from the station (uphill) but I immediately saw an increase. Encouraging! A few hours later I drove back down the canyon to meet a friend for lunch. While dining, the village was hit by a major downpour, complete with small hail. As is not uncommon here, runoff from the streets on the hill put a large volume of water on the main thoroughfare, completely swamping the gutters and putting large streams across in many places.

The point of all this is that I noticed as I slogged my way back home that my still-almost-instantaneous MPG (fewer than 10 miles from fill-up) dropped like a rock as I drove through all that water. By the time I got home, my MPG had dropped 10 from 57 to 47...all, presumably, because of the resistance of driving against all that water.

In the 13 years I've owned my Insight, I'd learned how incredibly sensitive it is to tire inflation (my "inflation meter" is whenever I see a drop in MPG across a tankful)...but until yesterday I guess I never considered how much of a decrease driving against that much resistance might bring. Not unlike driving into a serious headwind, I guess.
 

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Weather and temperature do indeed have a huge effect on economy.

The difference between 70*F and 90*F alone is generally a solid 10 MPG or 10% on trips.
 
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