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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My experience with both 2010 Prius and 2013 Insight

Hi

I have a Prius (2010) and Insight (2013), just filled up the 1st tank for Insight.

With the same driving condition (same driver, same road), I can usually get about 55MPG+ for Prius. I am getting almost the same for Insight.

I realized why some people can't get that good mileage for Insight. Its because the gas paddle for Insight is much responsive than Prius (both in eco mode). You can say that Prius cheat a little bit meaning their gas paddle just doesn't give you the power when you wanted it (no wonder you see so many slow Prius on the road). This sluggish gas paddle responsiveness ends up giving you better mileage easier . When driving Insight, you really need to intentionally watch out how much you press the paddle.

Another reason is Insight's engine is ALWAYS on even you leave the gear to P or N (this burns gas). The only way to shut it off is via break paddle meaning the car is stopped and your foot is on the break paddle. However, Prius shuts down the engine when you car is stopped or starting to stop (no need to press the paddle, doesn't matter in P or N). The engine is on ONLY when you start requesting more power.

At last, driving Insight doesn't make you feel you are driving a Hybrid, and its very obvious for Prius. Just my sharing..
 

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I agree with all of your comments. I am sure ,however that these different types of hybrid systems are each suited to different driving conditions. I find that driving our CT200 in a certain manner on some of our slower country roads gets better fuel consumption than the Insight, however, extracting the best from the CT seems to require more concentration. The insight easily outperforms our old 2007 prius on slow country roads but the 2007 prius was better in town.
Those people who have plug in hybrids will each have their own story to tell. Some of them with daily round trips no greater than 30 or so miles will hardly ever use petrol, while those who have sustained high speed journeys will perform differently.
I still maintain that for all cars with automatic gearboxes, diesels are the best for high speeds , long distances. hybrids are good for towns and best at low speed long distances ( over 30 mile round trips) and plug ins are best for urban low speed shorter distances.
Automatic gearbox design seems to be improving year on year. I expect that soon there will be very little to seperate manual gearbox and auto gearbox performance.
I often wonder in this day and age of automatic gearboxes in formula 1 cars whether this technology will pass down to production cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am also very surprised that so few people buying this car. I am getting the same MPG as to Prius (56MPG). You have to drive really slow in Prius though. Insight is definitely more fun to drive.
 

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pictures?

Pictures paint a thousand words Backstreet. but they dont put the words in order. What do your pictures say?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Alright, some updates on my new 2013 Insight, this is the 3rd tank adding, surprisingly its getting 60 MPG, way better than the 2010 Prius. I remember the number on the window was something like 46MPG, was it measured by Toyota?
 

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Pictures paint a thousand words Backstreet. but they dont put the words in order. What do your pictures say?
I like the glasses :)
I don't like the chunk out of the chair for the seatbelt. I don't like the non-driver aimed controls. I don't like the steering wheel. I don't like, well all.

I like the Insight and assumed I could like the Prius too if need be. I'm not sure now.
 

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Hmm, I can easily out MPG the Insight with our 2011 Prius. In Florida last Summer, using A/C and dealing with crazy Tampa suburban/urban traffic, I was able to get a 60 mpg average for a tank. I usually get 53-55 mpg with the Prius when we use it for travel, fully loaded with more gear than we could ever use on any trip.

So far, my best tank with the Insight has been a measured 53 mpg (actually way better than I ever expected!). It should get better as the car continues to break in. But right now, the "Geek" Prius mobile has the upper hand when I drive it.

My wife drives the Prius on a daily basis and generally average 52-53 mpg with her car. Unfortunately, I don't think her schedule allows her to take it as easy as she should to allow MPG increased beyond that level.

Both cars get excellent fuel mileage, but use totally different hybrid approaches toward that achievement. Both of these cars have their great points and not so great points. I have to really think about how I drive when I switch from one to the other, they are that different.
 

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The bigger difference between I2 and Prius is the price.

I calculated you would have to drive 350,000 miles to break even.

If you have to pay interest on the difference in price - well, neither car will last that long.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
My calculation is this,

Per tank, a Prius can drive about 550 Miles, a tank is about 10 G, in CA, its about $40 . If you drive about 10,000 Miles/yr, total cost is about 727

10000/550x40=$727

Say a civic
Per tank, a Civic can drive about 290 Miles, a tank is about 10 G too.

10000/290x40 = 1379

1379-727= 652 . A Prius is about 24000, Civic is 18000, (24000-18000) / (1379 - 727) = 9.2 Yrs to break even. I don't know if its fair to compare Civic and Prius though. However, if the gas continues to go up, the 9.2 Yrs is going to be shorter. But again, if the Prius battery died, the 9.2 Yrs will need to be extended.
 

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That big price difference is why I started to look at the Insight. Definite big bang for the buck with this car compared to Prius, and a mighty thrifty and reliable hybrid to boot.

Still feel (by the seat of the pants) that our Prius is the car for long trips. It's a little bigger inside so it holds a little more travel stuff and the leather seats are so comfortable for all day drives.

But for my every day driving needs, the Insight is the better suited car. It still performs a lot better than I expected, by far.
 

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I don't know why people poke so much fun at the Prius or say they hate it so much. It's just a car. I've owned all three generations of the Prius and all of them were fantastic. I currently have both a second gen Prius and 2013 Insight. Both are excellent cars. I enjoy driving the Prius when I want a relaxed drive. I enjoy the Prius' roominess and actual backseat that can fit real people because of the longer wheelbase. Sure, it doesn't handle like a sports car, but that's not what it's trying to do. I also prefer the Synergy Drive system to the Insight. So much easier to drive smoothly without all the jerkiness I get from the Insight. Plus, I can wait in line at a drive-thru in the Prius and not burn a drop of gas, or be stuck in a traffic jam with traffic just inching forward, while the Insight has to restart the engine every time I have to move just a couple feet.

Last year I took the Insight to see Christmas lights at the park and cars were moving at 3-11 MPH which is right where the threshold is to either go into AutoStop, regen, or go to gas power. I can't tell you how annoying the whole tour was in the Insight because of the engine stopping, starting, then the jerk & buck of going from gas to regen, then to AutoStop, then to running again. I can't tell you how many times mine & my passengers heads slammed up against the headrests or jerked forward. In the Prius, there is NONE of that whatsoever. I would have cruised the mile or two on EV without the engine running, and when the engine would turn on to run to either warm up or charge the battery, there isn't a jerk or a buck.

I'm not saying the Prius is better than the Insight. I'm a strong believer that everyone has *their own* perfect car for them. I love the Insight too, otherwise I would not have bought one. Everyone of course is entitled to their own preferences in automobiles, but there is a line.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Amen! :)

Prius: really good for bumper to bumper drive, below 20MPH, maybe sluggish a bit to speed up but can ALWAYS get me 550 per tank which is ~62MPG.

Insight: good for anything above 20MPG. More like driving a gas car meaning more powerful and better handling. If driving above 20MPG at all time, it can get me 53MPG per tank.

Both are very good cars, love them both.
 

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Amen! :)

Prius: really good for bumper to bumper drive, below 20MPH, maybe sluggish a bit to speed up but can ALWAYS get me 550 per tank which is ~62MPG.

Insight: good for anything above 20MPG. More like driving a gas car meaning more powerful and better handling. If driving above 20MPG at all time, it can get me 53MPG per tank.

Both are very good cars, love them both.
Agreed. Once the Insight is cruising, it's a nice ride.

Some things that *I* personally enjoy about the Prius:

Stealth, Prius offers the ability to drive using only electricity without the engine running under certain conditions. The maximum speed available is 42 MPH (45 MPH on the third generation). And the maximum distance is typically about 2 miles. The total silence of this design is how the term was coined.

WOW! Factor, reduced consumption & emissions is what people associate the word "hybrid" with. Finding out there's also an aspect of electric driving is quite a surprise. Experiencing it is a true delight.

Parking Lots, pure pleasure is what parking lots become when driving a Prius. The slow speeds accommodate stealth wonderfully. With the engine already warm, getting to & from a parking spot without any sound or vibration is effortless. Every press of the accelerator pedal results in a smooth, silent glide.

Stop & Slow Driving, emissions have been growing as the population continues to grow, because highway congestion worsens. Prius deals with this situation extraordinarily well. When highway speeds slow due to heavy traffic, the engine shuts off. Those with traditional vehicles all continue to waste gas. You just roll along in silence using stored battery power. Stealth carries you along without any waste... or emissions. Short distances, like a river crossing or where traffic merges, can be traversed at city speeds without the need to run the engine.

Maximum Speed, 42 MPH (45 MPH on the third gen) (68 km/h) is the fastest electric-only speed the system is capable of sustaining with the engine at 0 RPM. Beyond that, the engine provides a boost so the motor and battery-pack doesn't have to work as hard.

Cruising, once you begin driving a Prius, you'll find long, flat roads with 30 or 35 MPH (48 or 56 km/h) limits to be your favorite place to drive.

With the engine warmed up, smooth & silent driving is a pleasure your can invoke by simply releasing pressure on the accelerator pedal just long enough to trigger stealth. The engine will shut off. Then when you apply pressure again on the accelerator pedal, only electricity will be used for power. When you encounter a hill along the way, try to accelerate lightly. If the engine starts back up again, don't worry. It will shut back off quickly afterward you reach the top.

1/2 mile (0.8 km) stretches are what you'll find most common for stealth cruising, since it's hard driving further than that without encountering some sort or a hill in the city. And after a few of those stretches, the engine will start back up to recharge the battery-pack. Doing that avoids deep discharges, which shorten the life of the battery-pack. Losing stealth temporarily is disappointing. Thank goodness it only take a few minutes of driving to replenish the charge enough to return to stealth again.

Acceleration, you can accelerate smoothly from a stop using only the electricity with no sound or vibration.

Distance, technically, anywhere from 6 to 10 miles (9.6 to 16 km) driving solely on electricity is possible, but it's a very, very BAD thing to do. (Fortunately, the only way that's even possible if you run out of gas.) Deeply discharging the battery-pack will shorten its life, that's why the system goes out of its way to recharge even though electricity is still available. Many, many years after the purchase of your Prius, you'll be quite pleased that the battery-pack was protected from stress for you automatically.

Prius will allow you to drive 1/2 mile (0.8 km) stretches in stealth routinely. In fact, you'll find there's sometimes enough electricity available to use stealth several times during a long trip (like on a typical commute to work).

Warp Stealth, When driving at speeds faster than 42 MPH (68 km/h) with excess momentum propelling the car (like when you gain speed going down a hill), the engine will continue to pump the pistons; however, fuel won't always be supplied. This avoided waste increases overall MPG. Owners have dubbed this condition: "Warp Stealth" (I also use this term for the Insight since it can drive on electric-only, but the engine always has to be turning with it.)
 
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