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Discussion Starter #1
This really isn't a modification issue, but I thought this forum would be more appropriate for a technical question. I'm replacing the brake pads on my 2001 Insight as well as having the rotors resurfaced. I don't [yet] have a service manual and was wondering if anyone out there with one would be willing to post the torque specs for the two bolts which hold each brake caliper on.

Thanks for any help,

---
Steve
 

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For _best_ results the rotors should be resurfaced while _ON_ the car. This has been Honda's standard for almost 20 years now. The precision required to "jig" the rotor in an off the car lathe frequently results in machining errors and a "wobble" in the rotor. I would recommend not machining the rotors if off the car is your only choice unless the unevenness of the surfaces otherwise require it. _Careful_ braking for the first few hundred miles to allow the new pads to conform with the rotor will likely have better (but not the best) result. Machining on the car is the recommended and best long term fix. See the link below.

Torque is not critical for these bolts. The "spec" is not so tight that you damage the threads nor so loose that is can come apart.

See this old thread:

http://www.insightcentral.net/forum/vie ... 57d882470a

HTH! :)
 

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There is a tool available, probably too expensive.

Edit: Tongue in cheek reference to arcane method of resurfacing rotors removed by myself for safety reasons. :oops:
 

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Shotster said:
Thanks for the reply. Is there a way for the "home mechanic" to resurface rotors while on the car?
Unless you have the tools, no.

AFAIK the Honda recomended (as used in the dealerships) is:

http://www.kwik-way.com/products/BLT/la ... k-view.htm

the first item in the list Model 108 (link was broken when I tried). Without the power drive it can be used by allowing the engine to turn the wheels. The cutter head is around $1800.00 AFAIK. It does take some skill in use. So its really not a beginner task.

PS. I Hope you read sarcasm in b1shmu63's reply. At least I _hope_ he's not serious. <g>

HTH! :)
 

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Unless you have "grooves" in the disc, leave it alone. I replaced my pads at 104,000, "deglazed" the disc and that was it.

How many miles on the vehicle? That is the most important question to be answered.
 

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Willie Williford said:
Unless you have "grooves" in the disc, leave it alone. I replaced my pads at 104,000, "deglazed" the disc and that was it.

How many miles on the vehicle? That is the most important question to be answered.
Miles aren't as important as rotor condition. High salt exposure, heavy downhill braking, or heavy stop and go traffic will take its toll. Some types of impending rotor "problems" aren't readily apparent even with careful inspection, hence the recommended _minimum_ required cut on the rotors to make them "perfectly" smooth and flat.

Can you get away without rotor resurfacing? Yup sometimes. It depends on their current condition and the type of driving, err braking the car is subjected to.

The best alternative to forgoing rotor resurfacing is careful braking for a few hundred miles. Rotors and pads live longest with this technique anyway, so its always good cost saving advice.

Should a previously "invisible" rotor problem crop up a couple of thousand miles down the road the only sure fix at that point is to again replace the nearly new pads and resurface the rotors.

And don't forget to manually tighten up the rear shoes when replacing the front pads. Honda's "self adjusting" rear shoe system is rather lax in this regard. Adjusting to factory new specs will result in a higher firmer pedal with shorter braking distance potentials. And help balance the braking load, limiting rotor heat stress and wear.

HTH! :)
 

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Yes John, I was not suggesting that anyone try this! (Thats why the smiley and the reference to the Heimlich maneuver while choking)

I removed the paragraph just in case someone took it seriously, thanks.

Incidently, I really respect and enjoy reading your knowlegeable posts!
 

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Sorry you felt the need to retract your humorous statement b1shmu63.

I only "clarified" it because I've seen too many people try to pinch a penny just to later have to spend a dollar to fix it right the second time.

Communication via the written word is a real challenge. One of the dimensions I enjoy here.


And if you haven't already noticed I'm frequently grammatically and tyopgraphically challenged myself. <VBG>

Thanks for your words of encouragement. I just hope my High school and College English teachers don't read in here. <VBG>
 

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When pads need replacing I replace the rotors as well.
That's the best way to go.
Maching removes too much material, the difference between the thickness of new rotors and when they should be replaced is only 2 mm! (please check the manual and tell me if I remembered incorrectly)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Guillermo said:
When pads need replacing I replace the rotors as well.
Wow, that seems like overkill to me. I don't know what the manual says, but I doubt the rotor wears as quickly as the pads. I believe in replacing/fixing only what's needed.

Guillermo said:
Maching removes too much material, the difference between the thickness of new rotors and when they should be replaced is only 2 mm!
2mm is actually a fair amount of metal. Shops have ways of measuring the thickness of the rotors, and they won't resruface them if the rotors are worn beyond a certain limit (which I think is specific to each vehicle). I'm sure there is even an adequate "safety margin" in that lower limit as well.
 

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At 70,000 km I went to replace the original brake pads to high performance William solo2 pads for more instant braking power. The original pads had about 30% material left but the original rotors were very close to the wear limit. So It seems they wore out at close to the same rate. Machining them would have taken them down to the limit if I was lucky so it wasn't worth it.

It's crucial to measure the rotors when replacing the pads.
Why buy new pads and pay someone to machine the rotors, only to buy new rotors soon afterwards?

If the rotors last over twice as long as the pads then machining the rotors can make sense. In my case both the pads and rotors wore at about the same rate.
Keep in mind I use my brakes very little on the street but I use them a lot and very hard every weekend when i'm competing in autoslalom races, and a few track lapping days.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Guillermo said:
It's crucial to measure the rotors when replacing the pads.
Why buy new pads and pay someone to machine the rotors, only to buy new rotors soon afterwards?
In my experience, no machine shop will resurface the rotors if they're too thin. They do measure the thickness of the rotors against the limits for that particular vehicle before proceeding. If they're too thin, they won't turn 'em.
 

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If they're too thin, they won't turn 'em.
That requires trusting the mechanic, we all know that doesn't always work out well :roll:
 
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