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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking to replace the hybrid battery on my 2000 Honda Insight and I want to know if ennocar batteries are any good? I am trying to find the best battery I can without spending too much. And after some research I am confident the battery is 100% cooked
 

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I am looking to replace the hybrid battery on my 2000 Honda Insight and I want to know if ennocar batteries are any good? I am trying to find the best battery I can without spending too much. And after some research I am confident the battery is 100% cooked
A link to their website would help. All I could find on them is for 12 volt batteries.

Do you grid charge the battery you have now? How old is it?

Try Bumble Bee batteries on this website.
 

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You might very well be able to salvage your original battery... there are those on this forum who have done so with a grid charger. If you're certain you want to skip that step, Bumblebee is probably the most respected name in town.
 

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+1 For BB, they are extremely nice people, and have amazing customer service!
 

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mjhannes: Your link eventually shows they are located in CHINA. Do you really want to go that way?
What price are they quoting you.?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You might very well be able to salvage your original battery... there are those on this forum who have done so with a grid charger. If you're certain you want to skip that step, Bumblebee is probably the most respected name in town.
I also know we kept resetting the IMA system on the car whenever the light came on and I just recently did the mod to drive the car without the hybrid system because the IMA reset we were doing did not last more then 30 miles when previously it would easily last 1,000 miles
 

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I don’t have a grid charger but from what I can tell about my battery is the battery is the OG battery from the Honda factory
And the link:Shop Reliable Honda Insight Gen1 1999-2006 Hybrid Battery Replacement
A grid charger is also used as a maintenance tool to keep your battery in good health by balancing the cells. It is also used to rejuvenate a battery that still has some life left in it by using a [light bulb] discharge load. If you've never done that you really ought to buy or build your own for less than $100.

My Honda warranty replacement battery will be 9 years old in Jan 2022 and it's still working by using my grid charger/discharger setup.

Click on the CRX area below this post to go to my website for details on building, usage etc of my V2 grid charger/discharger.
 

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Ennocar is selling individual sticks....from China.

Are you prepared to fully disassemble the IMA battery?
Further, are you prepared to perform the necessary steps required to build up an IMA battery from new sticks? There are temperature sensors that need to be attached to select sticks with oversize heat shrink tubing. You may or may not need to do a PTC bypass. Probably some other pitfalls I'm not aware of too.

Are you comfortable dealing with high voltage direct current (HVDC)?


If there is a problem, what do you think the likelihood of getting warranty service is? From where I'm sitting, it's slim to none.
If there is a problem, are you prepared to do stick level troubleshooting?
If there is a problem, are you prepared to do all the labor of pack assembly....again?
Are you prepared for the $1100 to be a complete waste of money?

I work on Insights for a living right now, am technically adept, and more than capable of physically assembling an IMA battery. Even if I had the time, I would still much, much rather buy a pre-assembled pack from reputable source like Bumblebee or Hybrid Revolt.
 

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It sounds like your battery could still be in good shape chemically, but is just really unbalanced. If you're technically savvy, you can build a grid charger for under $50. Otherwise, you can buy a pre-built grid charger, which will still be many times cheaper than new cells.

FYI: $1100 for unverified NiMH sticks isn't a good deal. For $1095 you can get a refurbished pack from Bumblebee. For $1600 you can get brand new cells from a reputable dealer, who also performs the work to install them into the enclosure.
 

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Here's the bottom line with aftermarket sticks: with the exception of a few reputable rebuilders like Bumblebee, the forum's experience has not been good. Vendors like Bumblebee have identified suppliers that provide them known good cells. But that was after the community endured crap sticks that seemed ok at first but cannot tolerate the regime they are put through by normal car use. These older sticks end up leaking corrosive alectrolyte that damages the mounting plates, or self-discharge during periods of non-use and do not come back to life. I know this because I have seen it with my own eyes. I have two packs worth of aftermarket sticks and most have some degree of vented electrolyte visible on their ends.

Why is this so? Honda's original sticks were made by Panasonic which later changed names to Primearth. These cells could be the best you will find in NiMH without going to some highly specialized industrial application where weight is not a factor. When NiMH cells reach top of charge they start to heat up and produce gas. The OEM cells are built to tolerate this; in fact, the car depends on this to perform top balancing when it detects imbalance at engine start. I know this, because I see it on the pack I am currently using. I need to service this pack, but I am not in a rush because I've not seen any evidence of venting in the three or four packs worth of OEM sticks I've encountered. I am convinced that when a car starts to do this to crap sticks, the risk of venting is elevated.

The pack I'm running now is a pack holding original Panasonic sticks that I got for free from another member who was cleaning out his garage. This pack probably had not been used for years before he parted with it and then it sat at a friend's house for most of a year before I finally brought it home. I reconditioned it and was satisfied enough to drive across the country with it. It has some balance problem I need to solve, but after engine start and a few minutes of balancing it puts out tons of current.

Compare that to another pack of used aftermarket cells that came with a car I acquired. I let that pack sit for a year, and unlike the Honda sticks which seem to almost improve with years of non-use, a number of sticks in the aftermarket pack will not charge back to their original voltage. A pack of even older aftermarket cells has some sticks visibly leaking and most sticks will only partially charge.

I mentioned "recondition" earlier but I have not provided any detail. This is because it can't be explained in a single post and I'll not even try. Trying to do it yourself and achieve good results in the long term may not even be possible, at least not without buying or building some very expensive tools (BK Precision 8610 anyone?) and having a lot of extra sticks to build a pack that remains balanced over time and temperature. A lot of the best minds here have tried and moved on. To truly understand what is going on, one needs to test, test, test. I have over 1000 hours of individual cell data on two sticks on an automated tester I built at home.

So what's so bad about giving this or another vendor a try? Because building quality NiMH cells that can handle up to 100 AMPS over and over and over is HARD. I've blown good money on experiments with cheap EGR valves to learn why some of the cheapest aftermarket valves don't work and I am able to test a valve with a tester I built to tell of a valve really is bad. I've learned a lot from this. But the cost of such an experiment with no-name NiMH sticks is too high when the likelihood of an adverse outcome seems almost assured. I only had to open up one pack of aftermarket sticks to know that will never buy them.

Except maybe from the supplier that supplies Bumblebee, through Bumblebee, and in the form of one of the Bumblebee packs with a five year warranty. I've seen Eli's setup, and he knows how to qualify and characterize sticks. Which is what I would recommend to everyone, unless they want to attempt to build packs from used original Honda sticks, which requires more time, money and self-education (read: years) which is not of interest to anyone but the hardest core Insight nut jobs (read: myself) who are not able to choose alternate projects whose outcomes would provide much higher value. Not to mention the hazards of fooling with dangerous voltages and currents.

My suggestion is to spend the money to buy a Bumblebee pack with a five year warranty, don't look back, and use the time saved for more worthwhile projects.
 

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A battery direct from China? NO. Warranty would be impossible or harder.

I bought my HV battery from Greentecauto.com no issues, 36 month warranty. New 8ah cells, not "rebuilt".

Others have Bumblebee and are satisfied also.

Don't buy anything direct from China, It will not go well.
 
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Most of the Insighters would recommend this one: IMHO
 

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I went with Bumblebee, $2300 with all options selected. It took a day to do the replacement in my garage with a few tools. They have a YouTube video showing the step-by-step. Car works like new now.
 

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I am looking to replace the hybrid battery on my 2000 Honda Insight and I want to know if ennocar batteries are any good? I am trying to find the best battery I can without spending too much. And after some research I am confident the battery is 100% cooked
I have purchased two IMA batteries from Bumblebee and was very pleased with their service and product. They shipped the battery to my son's home, and I drove the car there. He replaced the battery, and sent the old one back to Bumblebee. It was very easy and quick. I recommend them.
 

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I am on my second one from hybrid revolt who gave me a very good deal with trading in the one originally purchased from them. I am by no means an expert here but replacement is not hard. Also, not mentioned in this string is the importance of the three ground straps in the engine bay. They are located on the drivers side of the car. You can find discussion of this elsewhere in the forum. My daughter drives the car now and I periodically check to make sure they are firmly connected. Years ago I found the OEMS had totally disintegrated and made my own with copper wiring and heat shrink wrapped tubing found at Home Depot attached to some connectors also bought there. You can find detailed information & instructions Elsewhere on this forum about how to do this. My second battery from hybrid revolt and the car has had no electrical problems for years since religiously staying on top of the ground straps.
 
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