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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Does anyone know or heard talk of Honda adding new options for the Insight this fall? No factory moonroof is a big detractor for me, and I really would like all-wheel disc breaks.

My Honda Pilot lease is up next February and looking at the 2010 models of the Ford Fusion Hybrid, Insight or Prius. I test drove the Insight earlier this week and liked it - my biggest complain beyond no moonroof and rear drum breaks is that the back seat is definitely somewhat cramped, but not a big issue for me.

Also, how is road noise - it's horrible in the Pilot - my previous cars (Infiniti G35 and Nissan Altima) were nice and quiet.
 

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You will not see anything new added to this Insight until the normal Mild Make Over in about 3 years as has been noticed on most of the Honda line. I believe Honda may offer Leather seats at that time, perhaps a tweak to the front and rear lights but do not see a Moonroof at all. The Civic Hybrid has never seen a moonroof either during its 4 years on the market.
 

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Why all the stink about rear drums? In this car i doubt if you'd even feel a difference! Especially if your using the REGEN like you should for max mpg.
 

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Perhaps I don't have enough feel for my cars, but I have not notice the difference with drum breaks. Had a 09 Civic, 08 Accord and now Insight with the rear drum breaks and everything seems about the same for me. Others may. :cool:
 

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For '09, the Civic Hybrid was upgraded to four-wheel disc brakes. Not sure why Honda made this unexpected change half-way through its production cycle, nor why the logic would not have carried over to the Insight, as well. Moral: if you feel you want/need discs all around, maybe add the Civic Hybrid as a contender.
 

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rear drums

During hard braking the weight of the car shifts towards the front axels. If the brakes were identical front and back, the rear wheels would lock up first and the car the car loose steering control. Using less powerful drum brakes on the rear wheels helps compensate for this effect. Cars with 4 wheel disc brakes reduce the relative pressure to the back brakes and/or use smaller disks in the back. If your driving/racing requires disk brakes on the rear you will also need more powerfull disc brakes on the front.

However, In my opinion rear discs would be easier to service and look better with certain "mag" wheels.

oa5599; Do you know if European cars are required by regulation to have rear discs?
 

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If the brakes were identical front and back, the rear wheels would lock up first and the car the car loose steering control. Using less powerful drum brakes on the rear wheels helps compensate for this effect.
While conceptually you are correct, the front/rear distribution of force is controlled by the proportioning valve, rather than by the size or type of brake. Here is an except provided by howstuffworks.com:

Proportioning Valve
The proportioning valve reduces the pressure to the rear brakes. Regardless of what type of brakes a car has, the rear brakes require less force than the front brakes.

The amount of brake force that can be applied to a wheel without locking it depends on the amount of weight on the wheel. More weight means more brake force can be applied. If you have ever slammed on your brakes, you know that an abrupt stop makes your car lean forward. The front gets lower and the back gets higher. This is because a lot of weight is transferred to the front of the car when you stop. Also, most cars have more weight over the front wheels to start with because that is where the engine is located.

If equal braking force were applied at all four wheels during a stop, the rear wheels would lock up before the front wheels. The proportioning valve only lets a certain portion of the pressure through to the rear wheels so that the front wheels apply more braking force. If the proportioning valve were set to 70 percent and the brake pressure were 1,000 pounds per square inch (psi) for the front brakes, the rear brakes would get 700 psi.
 

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For '09, the Civic Hybrid was upgraded to four-wheel disc brakes. Not sure why Honda made this unexpected change half-way through its production cycle, nor why the logic would not have carried over to the Insight, as well. Moral: if you feel you want/need discs all around, maybe add the Civic Hybrid as a contender.

For the adventurous, can the rear HCH disk brakes be retrofitted to the Insight II?

Some Porsche 914 owners fitted Toyota MR2 brakes as an less expensive alternate...
 

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Also, how is road noise - it's horrible in the Pilot - my previous cars (Infiniti G35 and Nissan Altima) were nice and quiet.
infiniti = luxury cars
nissan = luxury cars
honda = affordable, quality cars

your paying extra for that road noise reduction. i listen to my music at a slightly higher than normal level, so road noise isnt an issue for me :)
Some Porsche 914 owners fitted Toyota MR2 brakes as an less expensive alternate...
did you just use "porsche owners" and "less expensive" in the same sentence?
 

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did you just use "porsche owners" and "less expensive" in the same sentence?

Yeah, a 20 year-old 914 is sort of affordable.....;-0

My 1986 944 was cheaper than my 2005 Prius...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
re road noise: I'll give you that on the Infiniti - but a Nissan Altima is NOT a luxury car - and my $27,000 Pilot is not exactly cheap. I think it's just something Honda doesn't put a priority on, and was hoping maybe that had changed with the Insight.

I prefer disc brakes for a few reasons (less prone to fade, easier to service yourself, less affected by water, look better, etc) - drums aren't a deal breaker, but I'd prefer discs.

While I like the mileage of the 3 hybrids I'm considering, the mpg isn't my primary concern.
 

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He was talking about the 914, which was a VW badged as a Porsche for the US market. The 914 started at under $4K new and proved to be a major embarrassment to the Porsche marque.

Still one of the great autocross/slalom cars of all time...and, no embarrassment att all, except to the larger cars:)
 

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Also, how is road noise - it's horrible in the Pilot - my previous cars (Infiniti G35 and Nissan Altima) were nice and quiet.
The only time I notice any noise is at highway speeds, and it's not bad. My old '98 CRV was MUCH louder.
 

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Still one of the great autocross/slalom cars of all time...and, no embarrassment att all, except to the larger cars:)
In six-cylinder form, the 914 was an interesting slalom vehicle. But as a daily driver, it was... pathetic and horrendous. I owned one, and was on the slalom track almost every weekend.
 

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My 2010 Insight seems quieter than the Hondas in my past: 1991 Civic, 2004 Insight, and 2007 Fit Sport.
 

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I was also a bit bummed out by the drum brakes. But my one and only reason for that is because drum brakes are a pain in the rear to replace. Disc brakes can be done in half the time or less. However, I was willing to overlook it due to the fact that hybrids usually don't need their brakes changed nearly as often. I've heard of Prius's getting over 100K miles before a brake job.
 
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