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Discussion Starter #1
First, thanks for having me. I'm a gearhead that grew up wrenching on stuff and was the guy in high school that changed cars like underwear. Previously had a Smart for two, a MK1 Rabbit diesel, loads of Jeep XJ's and a bunch of others not worth mentioning. Currently have a MK4 TDI wagon, a 1999 Jeep TJ (my handle) and a BMW i3.

So why am I on here? Great question. I need your advice and help.

Here's a bit of back story on my new project G1. One of my coworkers was the second owner of a 2000 5spd W/AC silver G1. He purchased it from the original dealer that retailed it new. The original owner traded it in on a brand new Insight. My coworker drove it for a little less than a year and had to leave it here when he transferred last summer. It had the IMA light come on, he was sure it needed an IMA battery and couldn't drive it to his new place across the country. So it sat in the lot completely neglected, I always thought these were groundbreaking and quirky cars, just the kind of stuff I enjoy. So I worked a deal and I am now the third owner of this 100% dealer maintained previously garaged G1. I just couldn't leave it to sit on the lot anymore. The paint is awesome, the interior is complete and original as well as very clean. Not a spot on the headliner and the seat belts are even dry today after about 3" of rain. The brake lines look solid, but surface rusted, same for the fuel lines. The rear axle again has surface rust, but for a 20 year old Michigan car, it's in amazing shape. It's never been hit and is straight as the day it left the factory.

This place was a wealth of knowledge getting me up to speed on the common faults and a great buyers guide. Thank you all for compiling all this. I checked the stuff that would indicate the car had been neglected previous to my coworker buying it. My coworker didn't have a lot of knowledge of the car, I don't think he gave a much concern about it and just drove it enjoying 60 MPG or so. So he was certain it needed an IMA battery, and that the battery has been replaced in 2009 by the dealer at 90k ish miles. I don't see that on the CarFax from when he bought it. I see "replaced battery" the 12V is dated 2009 as well.

When I went to jump the car so I could confirm the mileage, and inspect it better. The car of course wouldn't start on the IMA battery, but it wouldn't crank on the 12V battery either. I found the two ground straps for the engine corroded completely apart. After re-crimping one it fired right up on the 12V battery. The 12 battery light was on for a while, but the IMA was charging and then after about 4 minutes the 12v system voltage went up to 13 volts and the battery light went out. Great news, the car isn't dead. Reading on here the DC-DC converter will shut off if the IMA pack is below a certain threshold. That must have been the case. The IMA light was on with a P1756 code. I didn't know enough to check the flash code, read about that after the fact.

Took about a week to finish the deal and transfer the title. Today I threw a new 12v battery in the car. It fired right up on the IMA battery and it immediately started charging the 12V battery. No battery light no IMA light no CEL. The car charged the IMA until 4 bars which took about 5 minutes, and then dropped into low idle and neutral charge/assist. I haven't taken it on the road yet, just a few hundred feet to the lift for inspection. I have a list going of things that will need attention. All the ground's cleaned rebuilt or replaced. The lower radiator hose clamp is completely rotted off so the coolant is staying in the car by magic. I want to clean out the EGR plate, do the catchup servicing on all the fluids. It's going to need brakes from sitting. I want to wire brush and POR-15 or rust convert the rear axle, the hardlines, and the hardline mounts.

So that's my long story so far. I'm just a bit overwhelmed by the amount of data on here and the more I read it seems the more lost I get. So if you'll humor me I'll ask you a few direct questions.

Given my backstory above.
1. How can I determine if this is a Honda battery from 2009? Should be a primus pack with Orange cells right?
2. Do you think this pack bottom balanced over the last year?
3. Should I try a grid charger or just bite the bullet and replace the pack? I'd have to buy both.
4. What am I missing that I should be checking for before I spend big money on a pack to bring this old girl back?
5. What should I be watching for on this first drive home?

Thanks again for all the great knowledge so far.

-Sean
 

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1) 2009 is right on the edge, I think it would probably be a Panasonic pack with yellow cells.

2) Very likely

3) You may as well drive on the pack in the mean time, you might be surprised at how long you get out of the pack, especially if you invest in a grid charger. It's normal that it stopped charging after 4 bars, but do not drive it in this state - it is unlikely that you will get the IMA battery as high in SoC as you could with the proper procedure. The proper way to charge the IMA battery is to rev the engine to 3000RPM or higher until the battery gauge reads full. It's important that you do this, especially in lieu of a grid charger after the battery has sat.

4) It seems like you've got it pretty well covered. The one alarming thing I've heard about lately is a small coolant leak near the head that often goes unnoticed until catastrophe. Scott or others can chime in there.

5) Coolant temp; the Insight's coolant temp gauge sucks. If it EVER goes above 6 bars, pull over immediately - it hits 8 bars around 250F IIRC.

Highly recommend an OBDIIC&C Gauge to monitor things like coolant temp and IMA battery parameters.
 
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Welcome - it's nice to have another gearhead join the party. It sounds like yours fell into your lap like mine have. As a gearhead you may already have experience with what I'm writing below but I've already written it and it may benefit others.

4) It seems like you've got it pretty well covered. The one alarming thing I've heard about lately is a small coolant leak near the head that often goes unnoticed until catastrophe. Scott or others can chime in there.
My second Insight was given to me because it was having a systemic overheating problem. The previous owner had dropped many thousands of dollars into repairs to fix damaged done by overheating and related work.

However, we don't hear much about overheating being a problem. I probably read all the overheating threads to determine that a tube in the coolant recovery tank was the culprit. This tube has a friction fit over a smaller tube in the cap. However, it has been reported that these have fallen off.

The function of the coolant recovery tank is to capture coolant that is forced out under pressure as the engine heats up and the coolant and any residual air bubbles expand. When the engine cools down, the coolant and air bubbles contract and the resulting pressure drop sucks the coolant back in. The tube going into the tank is kind of like a straw in a cup of soda.

If the straw falls out, the coolant enters the tank when the car heats up, but when the engine cools and the vacuum develops, air is sucked in instead of the coolant. At some point the tank will fill and overflow (but probably after the owner has already left the driveway) and this might be the first outward sign that something is wrong. Air expands a heck of a lot more than coolant when it heats up. Also, the overflow tube is NOT at the highest point in the cooling system. So, some amount of air can get trapped in the head if the overflow tank is not kept filled and air is sucked in while the engine cools, or the straw (tube) has fallen off, or in the case of my car, some mechanic noticed it had fallen off, and replaced it, but the replacement tube was hard plastic and did not seal well, the result being kind of like sucking soda through a straw that has a crack in it - you get a mixture of soda and air. So the previous owner would have a major overheat event (once the head is dry, it only takes a few minutes of operation), the mechanics would burp it and find nothing wrong, and a number of hot/cold cycles later, enough air would have entered for it to overheat again. (One of the repairs was a head gasket job).

Indeed, after reading one or two posts about this tube falling off, I checked the tank and yep, the original tube was still inside. I removed the hard plastic tube, carved barbs into the smaller tube in the cap to better grip the rubber tube, and wrapped a bunch of enamel motor wire around the junction so that there would be no chance of it falling off again. (There is no room for a hose clamp).

You will read in the forum about the occasional camshaft snapping. This does enough damage to the head that the easiest solution is to replace the head. This has been blamed on oil problems, and in fact some of the engines pictured look extremely poorly taken care of (lots of gunk and deposits). But I have not read of a single oil system failure (though someone might not report their oil running dry) and some of the engines look clean. Some failures have been reported on the freeway, which is when the load should be greatest. After finding this overheating problem and that multiple tubes have fallen into recovery tanks, I have to wonder if an accumulation of air in the cylinder head is a possible cause of some of these failures. However, I don't know how much air actually gets trapped in the head, or how the flow of coolant while the engine is running redistributes the air pocket, so it's just an alternative theory at this point.

Bottom line, a few of these cars might have benefitted from an "early warning system" that sounds an audible alarm if the coolant temperature rises above a certain point (because of the poor resolution of the gauge in the dash) and monitors the high and low water points of the coolant tank to detect the introduction of air into the system. (Some people have reported radiator leaks.)

Best,

Sean
 

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Awesome on the car and excellent posts Sean and Eli. Thank you. I overheated mine and had issues but now it isn’t doing what it did before. Was going to kswap to avoid having to replace battery pack but I want the mpg so I’m going to be saving for the lithium so I can refresh my insights. Thanks for sharing about the head gasket. In my impression wi would have thought the rings would be shot necessitating more than just a head resurface and or valve job to replace the guides and seals.
 

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...My coworker didn't have a lot of knowledge of the car, I don't think he gave much concern about it and just drove it enjoying 60 MPG or so. So he was certain it needed an IMA battery, and that the battery had been replaced in 2009 by the dealer at 90k ish miles. I don't see that on the CarFax from when he bought it. I see "replaced battery" the 12V is dated 2009 as well...

1. How can I determine if this is a Honda battery from 2009? Should be a primus [Prime earth] pack with Orange cells right?
Despite your coworker thinking the pack was replaced in 2009 "by the dealer," the fact that you don't find a record but instead find one for 12V battery replacement - by the dealer - creates the distinct possibility that the pack wasn't replaced. It's been known to happen - people conflating 12V battery replacement with IMA pack replacement.

The only way I know of to verify the vintage of the pack is to look at the serial number sticker on the sticks. The 4th or 5th character is a letter that indicates the year. Off the top of my head I recall "L" is 2007, so anything higher is newer, anything lower is older. So "K" is 2006, "J" 2005, and so on. "N" would be 2009 - if my recollection of "L" being 2007 is correct...

Other than that, I recall there's a blue sticker on the pack case. I'm thinking the later stickers say "Prime Earth" or something like that, while earlier ones say "Panasonic EV Energy," or something like that. Maybe Eli can elaborate. Not sure when the change took place...

As far as I know older Insight packs tend to be orange sticks. You can look through the fan opening to see the color...
 

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Despite your coworker thinking the pack was replaced in 2009 "by the dealer," the fact that you don't find a record but instead find one for 12V battery replacement - by the dealer - creates the distinct possibility that the pack wasn't replaced. It's been known to happen - people conflating 12V battery replacement with IMA pack replacement.

The only way I know of to verify the vintage of the pack is to look at the serial number sticker on the sticks. The 4th or 5th character is a letter that indicates the year. Off the top of my head I recall "L" is 2007, so anything higher is newer, anything lower is older. So "K" is 2006, "J" 2005, and so on. "N" would be 2009 - if my recollection of "L" being 2007 is correct...

Other than that, I recall there's a blue sticker on the pack case. I'm thinking the later stickers say "Prime Earth" or something like that, while earlier ones say "Panasonic EV Energy," or something like that. Maybe Eli can elaborate. Not sure when the change took place...

As far as I know older Insight packs tend to be orange sticks. You can look through the fan opening to see the color...

Well, the service report to carfax didn't specify either way. Just said replaced battery. Can I see the serial numbers without pulling and dismantling the pack?
 

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Thanks for the replies. I had to drive it home about 3 miles from work. I kept the RPMs up and did my best to stay out of the assist. The car charged up the IMA in about 7 minutes. The battery gauge showed full and I continued the driving regim of higher RPM and no assist until I got home about 5 more minutes after the gauge went full.

No IMA light or CEL. I plan to fix the lower radiator hose clamp, the grounds and maybe do some rust conversion/remediation tomorrow.

How long should the car take to charge the pack back up from 4 lines?
 

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Welcome - it's nice to have another gearhead join the party. It sounds like yours fell into your lap like mine have. As a gearhead you may already have experience with what I'm writing below but I've already written it and it may benefit others.



My second Insight was given to me because it was having a systemic overheating problem. The previous owner had dropped many thousands of dollars into repairs to fix damaged done by overheating and related work.

However, we don't hear much about overheating being a problem. I probably read all the overheating threads to determine that a tube in the coolant recovery tank was the culprit. This tube has a friction fit over a smaller tube in the cap. However, it has been reported that these have fallen off.

The function of the coolant recovery tank is to capture coolant that is forced out under pressure as the engine heats up and the coolant and any residual air bubbles expand. When the engine cools down, the coolant and air bubbles contract and the resulting pressure drop sucks the coolant back in. The tube going into the tank is kind of like a straw in a cup of soda.

If the straw falls out, the coolant enters the tank when the car heats up, but when the engine cools and the vacuum develops, air is sucked in instead of the coolant. At some point the tank will fill and overflow (but probably after the owner has already left the driveway) and this might be the first outward sign that something is wrong. Air expands a heck of a lot more than coolant when it heats up. Also, the overflow tube is NOT at the highest point in the cooling system. So, some amount of air can get trapped in the head if the overflow tank is not kept filled and air is sucked in while the engine cools, or the straw (tube) has fallen off, or in the case of my car, some mechanic noticed it had fallen off, and replaced it, but the replacement tube was hard plastic and did not seal well, the result being kind of like sucking soda through a straw that has a crack in it - you get a mixture of soda and air. So the previous owner would have a major overheat event (once the head is dry, it only takes a few minutes of operation), the mechanics would burp it and find nothing wrong, and a number of hot/cold cycles later, enough air would have entered for it to overheat again. (One of the repairs was a head gasket job).

Indeed, after reading one or two posts about this tube falling off, I checked the tank and yep, the original tube was still inside. I removed the hard plastic tube, carved barbs into the smaller tube in the cap to better grip the rubber tube, and wrapped a bunch of enamel motor wire around the junction so that there would be no chance of it falling off again. (There is no room for a hose clamp).

You will read in the forum about the occasional camshaft snapping. This does enough damage to the head that the easiest solution is to replace the head. This has been blamed on oil problems, and in fact some of the engines pictured look extremely poorly taken care of (lots of gunk and deposits). But I have not read of a single oil system failure (though someone might not report their oil running dry) and some of the engines look clean. Some failures have been reported on the freeway, which is when the load should be greatest. After finding this overheating problem and that multiple tubes have fallen into recovery tanks, I have to wonder if an accumulation of air in the cylinder head is a possible cause of some of these failures. However, I don't know how much air actually gets trapped in the head, or how the flow of coolant while the engine is running redistributes the air pocket, so it's just an alternative theory at this point.

Bottom line, a few of these cars might have benefitted from an "early warning system" that sounds an audible alarm if the coolant temperature rises above a certain point (because of the poor resolution of the gauge in the dash) and monitors the high and low water points of the coolant tank to detect the introduction of air into the system. (Some people have reported radiator leaks.)

Best,

Sean

The straw is firmly attached to the expansion tank cap on this car. Great tip for a small thing that will kill the car though. The gauge stated right a 4 lines even with my high RPM no start stop driving technique and the A/C running. I think the cooling system is pretty rock solid on this car.
 

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Well, the service report to carfax didn't specify either way. Just said replaced battery. Can I see the serial numbers without pulling and dismantling the pack?
OK, I see, you said "replaced battery" followed by noting the 12V has a date code of 2009...

Unfortunately, no, you can't see the serial numbers without dismantling. Your best quick bet is to peek into the fan shroud and check the color, as well as to find that blue sticker on the black pack frame and see if it says "Panasonic" or "Primearth"... I can't remember where it is or if it's visible with pack in place. If I remember I'll go look at my pack tomorrow and report back, if no one else chimes-in first...

How long should the car take to charge the pack back up from 4 lines?
Hard to say -- since in-car background charging and regen charging current can vary so much. If your pack was totally self discharged from sitting so long, then usually the voltage curve would be very flat across most of the charge state range and would take a while to charge completely. On the other hand, it can be flat but also sometimes too high, which can trigger 'full' prematurely...

If it wasn't totally self discharged it could be anything. 4 lines (bars) alone is probably no more than about 10%, and then you'd have another...maybe 40% to go. 40% of total capacity is 2.6Ah, and typically the background charge is about 7 amps (if you were just cruising steady, and background charge continued). So 2.6Ah/7A = 0.37 hours, or 22 minutes...

In the near future, when you're driving with IMA in-play, watch for the BAT gauge making large jumps, either from high or mid to the bottom, fast like 'tick-one thousand, tick two thousand', or vice versa - from low or middle to the top real fast. If everything's up to snuff the gauge shouldn't make the big jumps. With your pack having sat for so long it wouldn't be unexpected to see some 'warbles' of this kind...
 

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OK, I see, you said "replaced battery" followed by noting the 12V has a date code of 2009...

Unfortunately, no, you can't see the serial numbers without dismantling. Your best quick bet is to peek into the fan shroud and check the color, as well as to find that blue sticker on the black pack frame and see if it says "Panasonic" or "Primearth"... I can't remember where it is or if it's visible with pack in place. If I remember I'll go look at my pack tomorrow and report back, if no one else chimes-in first...



Hard to say -- since in-car background charging and regen charging current can vary so much. If your pack was totally self discharged from sitting so long, then usually the voltage curve would be very flat across most of the charge state range and would take a while to charge completely. On the other hand, it can be flat but also sometimes too high, which can trigger 'full' prematurely...

If it wasn't totally self discharged it could be anything. 4 lines (bars) alone is probably no more than about 10%, and then you'd have another...maybe 40% to go. 40% of total capacity is 2.6Ah, and typically the background charge is about 7 amps (if you were just cruising steady, and background charge continued). So 2.6Ah/7A = 0.37 hours, or 22 minutes...

In the near future, when you're driving with IMA in-play, watch for the BAT gauge making large jumps, either from high or mid to the bottom, fast like 'tick-one thousand, tick two thousand', or vice versa - from low or middle to the top real fast. If everything's up to snuff the gauge shouldn't make the big jumps. With your pack having sat for so long it wouldn't be unexpected to see some 'warbles' of this kind...
Yeah, it's a crap shoot. The guy I guy I bought it off said that was the H.V. pack replace date. I just found that to be suspect since the 12V date matches and the service record doesn't specify. I'd expect it to note the H.V. pack if it were indeed the high dollar battery that was replaced. I'll report back the pack color and if I can find the sticker. I want to open that compartment and evict any rodents straight away and inspect and clean up any suspect connections, so I'll be in there regardless.


I did my very best to stay out of regen and keep the RPMs to a steady 3K with super gradual acceleration to that end. I don't think the pack got more than 30 seconds of regen charging. So I'd guess I'm looking at a false full or a toasted pack. I did try to let it regen down from 55MPH one time after the pack showed full and the regen gauge didn't light up, so I'm thinking the car was acting like it was full.

I'll work on the other stuff that I'm worried about like the hose clamp and get the brakes cleaned up or replaced depending on how they look. Then I guess I'll put a few miles on it and see what it does. I'm not scared to put a pack in it. I just don't want to waste money if this one is serviceable.

Thanks for helping me talk through this. It's great to get a gut check on my thinking.
 

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I did my very best to stay out of regen and keep the RPMs to a steady 3K with super gradual acceleration to that end. I don't think the pack got more than 30 seconds of regen charging. So I'd guess I'm looking at a false full or a toasted pack.
At or above 3000 RPMs, charging off the ICE (what we've been calling 'background charging', even though it's not always in the background) - it will be a lot higher current, maybe around 15-20 amps around 3k.
 

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Decided to order a grid charger and try that. So when that gets here I'll open up the back and try and get a better idea what battery is in it. I figure the grid charger is kind of a necessary add on either way. In the meanwhile I dug into the rust remediation on the underside. The steal lines were rusty but not scary yet, so this was the perfect time to attack them all with a wire brush, some rust converter and then my favorite top coat, rust reformer spray can.

I'm amazed at how good this car looks for a 20 year old Michigan car. I bet this car was mint until the guy I got it from drove it on a dirt road daily for a little over a year. Anyone ever see one of those spring style hose clamps disintegrate like this? That was a first for me.

B49224A1-C7D3-4F2C-B68D-160FCE1FCB10_1_105_c.jpeg 885E4415-B3DA-4DFD-8874-45DC66050921_1_105_c.jpeg 4C263BB8-ED3E-4860-8005-0E51180D2CEA_1_105_c.jpeg EB05B28D-55A7-4779-8E7D-9D056DFFCCE1_1_105_c.jpeg 9D704140-AA70-428D-80F8-ADD4152FC055_1_105_c.jpeg
 

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I have not had much luck with grid charging my pack which is starting to act up, and I think I need to do a gentle discharge. @eq1 has a process that limits current that employs the short circuit current limiting built into the Battery-to-BCM connection that he can speak about. I really wanted to develop a pack conditioning regimen, but I haven't had the time.

Then again, my pack is not yet throwing codes and mostly works. But it is definitely imbalanced, particularly after an overnight rest.

The steal lines were rusty but not scary yet, so this was the perfect time to attack them all with a wire brush, some rust converter and then my favorite top coat, rust reformer spray can.
Thank you for this tip!
 

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Two days of commuting on my admittedly easy 12 mile 60 MPH max drive. No IMA lights, no CEL and I've exercised the pack a little bit. The car seems to be in very good shape considering. The battery has stayed above 7/8 and besides the brakes sounding like rust on rust the car has done real well. It's running like crap on the old gas, herky jerky for sure. So I've got an EGR gasket set so I can clean the EGR plate, a set of B indexed plugs, and a valve cover gasket coming from Majestic.

Anything I'm missing on the rough running engine?
I'm pretty sure some fresh gas will help, but I want to burn the injector cleaner before I add any, and the fuel gauge hasn't budged sitting at 1/3 of tank. Got a set of rear wheel bearings coming too since they also sound like garbage.
 

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Put the new wheel bearings in the rear tonight. Car is actually pretty quiet, I can't believe how loud they were and that the P.O. let them get like that. I'll keep the radio at a much lower volume now, and might hear my phone ring. Maybe I should put the loud ones back so I can't hear the phone.

Changed the plugs, One of them wasn't tight. Did the EGR plate clean out. The EGR plate was not terrible, probably half blocked. Adjusted the valves to since they were a bit clackity. Car runs soo much better and is like a sewing machine instead of a TDI now. Took it for a bit of a spirited drive to blow out the sea foam I let soak on the back of the valves while I cleaned to EGR plate off.

The IMA battery was full, so I figured I'd lay into it now that the Herky Jerky seemed gone. Nice long pull in 4th gear, all the way up to 75MPH and the battery gauge went down two diodes. No IMA light, no CEL, this was the first full assist pull I'd made with the car, since owning it. It actually has power with all three cylinders joining the party and letting the IMA do it's thing. I put probably 100 miles on it driving it like my EV, keeping as much regen as possible. The last two drives it had stopped regening so I'm pretty sure the battery was actually full. Did I really get this lucky with this battery? Or is it going to crap out suddenly and catastrophically next week?

I'd like to do a few cosmetic things, but don't want to blow the battery budget. Stuff like the fix the A pillar/roof mouldings. They both have one or two of the metal clips along the roof that aren't seated right and the fenders are outside the mouldings so they are sticking out. I'd never have noticed if it wasn't for you guys. Could use a new belly pan and some fresh rivets and hardware as well.

Here's the valve train, pretty clean for nearing 200K. I think this car was someone's baby, I'm glad I can save it. You can see the soot on the number 2 Cyl plug from what has to be it being just barely loose.
EBCED738-6745-4C4A-9F49-A6338BAD35F4_1_105_c.jpeg 38CFF8D6-CF7A-4AC4-9F22-A01890CA9ED7_1_105_c.jpeg 0A691954-19A2-453E-8665-0CD9AD1177EE_1_105_c.jpeg
 

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The IMA battery was full, so I figured I'd lay into it now that the Herky Jerky seemed gone. Nice long pull in 4th gear, all the way up to 75MPH and the battery gauge went down two diodes. No IMA light, no CEL, this was the first full assist pull I'd made with the car, since owning it. It actually has power with all three cylinders joining the party and letting the IMA do it's thing. I put probably 100 miles on it driving it like my EV, keeping as much regen as possible. The last two drives it had stopped regening so I'm pretty sure the battery was actually full. Did I really get this lucky with this battery? Or is it going to crap out suddenly and catastrophically next week?
Hard to say. My pack is quite weak, but still provides a surprising amount of usable assist. My battery gauge also almost always shows full. I'll get ~4 weeks of driving with no issues, assist works, regen works, auto stop works, but the batter gauge is just always full. Then I'll get a few recalls and IMA light. Sometimes during strong assist, sometimes just randomly. From what I've read none of this is uncommon behavior for old packs with weak cells.

If I pull the fuse to reset the computer I can get a couple trouble free weeks of driving before another IMA at which point I usually don't push it and just plug it in to the grid charger. If I proactively grid charge every month, the IMA light stays off.

So all this is to say - I'd not get too attached to the idea you have a strong pack. It may have issues, even if it works. You'll just have to drive it a while and see. But the good news is packs don't usually fail catastrophically. Weak cells get progressively worse and cause more frequent and severe issues. The fact that it's working fine means that even if it has some issues, you've probably got something you can work with. So even if you get an IMA light next week when you mash the assist, I wouldn't let it get you down, you can potentially string it along for years as many forum members have done.
 

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So all this is to say - I'd not get too attached to the idea you have a strong pack. It may have issues, even if it works. You'll just have to drive it a while and see. But the good news is packs don't usually fail catastrophically. Weak cells get progressively worse and cause more frequent and severe issues. The fact that it's working fine means that even if it has some issues, you've probably got something you can work with. So even if you get an IMA light next week when you mash the assist, I wouldn't let it get you down, you can potentially string it along for years as many forum members have done.
Thanks for the reply, your supporting my theory on this pack that it's probably weakend, but not dead yet. I'm certainly not banking on this pack, but I'm glad that it's not complete trash and I can put some miles on it and not feel rushed into spending the big money. I guess I'm just struggling with determining how bad this pack is without an object of comparison.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
So tonight the rear hatch started whirring and not opening. The key wouldn't open it either. I found a couple threads for the 3D printed clutch and stuff, but shouldn't the key still open it if the clutch was the only failed part?

I can easily open it from the inside so the linkage feels intact at first glance, but I can't seem to find a real good thread with pictures for my dumb mechanic brain.


Jesse emailed me back in what seemed like seconds when I emailed him to confirm he was still selling the clutch. I'm sorry for adding myself to the list of idiots emailing you rather than digging around on here more. I found the master thread this morning.

Thank you all for being such an amazing resource for these cars.
 

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You can open it with the key, but you have to twist it farther than you think. Then you squeeze the handle.

Sam
 
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