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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I purchased a 2006 CVT with 37K miles a couple of months ago. The lifetime MPG is 42 and I'm currently getting 43. I have read a ton of threads with tips and tricks, but I have not seen anyone say they are getting this low MPG. The last owner was a collector and sold roughly 30 of his cars in an auction when I purchased the Insight so it sat for an unknown amount of time. I have replaced the tires, changed the oil with Mobil 1, changed the trans fluid with CVT fluid from the dealership, replaced the air filter, and that's about it. Everything seems to work fine and it runs great, was just expecting better MPG when I bought it. I will be inflating my tires, I saw someone recommends 42/40?

I currently live in Mississippi near the coast so it's not terribly cold. My daily drive to work and back home is around 45 miles (mostly interstate). I usually drive 70-75 MPH to avoid getting run over by the crazy drivers here.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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2002 Monte Carlo Blue CVT
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Try new plugs, or at the very least, try checking the torque on the plugs. Bridgestone Potenzas inflated to 45 psi, Scott Kulbeck's belly pan, and try to keep the RPMs between 1500-2000. That gets me in the mid fifties or better. Mostly better on summer gas.

Jack up the car and spin the wheels. Dragging brakes will kill mileage faster than almost anything.

Change all fluids -- brake fluid especially -- if the car was sitting.
 

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Slow down. See what you get at 60-65. I recently did a test. 600 miles at 60-70 got me ~67. 600 miles at 70-80 got me ~54. 5-speed.

Sam
 
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2002 Honda Insight [manual]
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To me that seems alright for a CVT but not as good as it gets. Make sure you've got all your aero panels (I'm sure it does with that low of mileage) and keeping it a bit lower speed on the highway will help tremendously like rainsux said.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you all for the suggestions. I'm definitely not upset with 43, I was just expecting to be in the 50's at least. I'll work on the way I drive, slow down a bit, inflate tires, check brakes, change fluid and see what happens.

Thanks again!
 

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Drive as though you have a raw egg between the sole of your shoe and the gas pedal. Light touch. When you reach your desired cruising speed, ease pressure off the gas, watch the mpg slider go up and try to maintain your speed. Mpg improvement will result.
 

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2005 Honda Insight Automatic
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I also just want to point out as I didn't see others point it out, the CVT and manual are a bit different.

The manual version can enter "Lean Burn" mode and it will get higher mpg than the CVT because of that.
 

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You said you replaced the tires, did you put RE92’s on?

Scott
 

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Any non Bridgestone RE92 tire will cost you 8-10 MPG. On the other hand, they probably have better traction and ride.

At what speed did you achieve the 54.4 MPG above, and was it a continuous trip?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Any non Bridgestone RE92 tire will cost you 8-10 MPG. On the other hand, they probably have better traction and ride.

At what speed did you achieve the 54.4 MPG above, and was it a continuous trip?
The majority of the trip was interstate at 65 MPH to and from work. Around 10 miles was city at 25-35 MPH.
 

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If these are 175s instead of 165s that's even worse. You're going to drive ~50K miles before you replace them? When you do you'll be really sorry you didn't do it sooner. Maybe you can return them where you bought them.

Sam
 

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You know, I’ve always wondered if the manual takes a greater hit on alternative tires than the CVT would. With no leanburn to try and maintain, I’m just guessing that (to a certain point) we CVT drivers won’t notice as much a difference.
I’ve been wrong before, of course ;-)
I do want to second the dragging brakes check. If nothing else, after a nice drive, feel the wheels. The temps should be the same left and right. If one is significantly hotter than the other, you’ve found a stuck one!
 

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Oh, and I’d also be curious if you’ve done any battery maintenance. An unbalanced battery will cause the car to background charge a lot more, and that soaks up MPGs.
 
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