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Discussion Starter #1
The spark plugs are definetly one of the draw backs of the Insight. Special, special, special. Make sure you get the right stamped plugs prior to walking out of the dealer. The Honda parts guy said they were all "B" stamp and so I checked. One of the three was an "A" stamp. Very important to get the right ones. I'm assuming the plugs come with the gap pre-set, Right? What if they are damaged in shipping and the gap is moved? Where do I find the correct gap for a "B" stamped plug? How would I ever know if the gap is correct or damaged somehow?

All I can say is that I'm glad the plugs only need to be changed every 100K miles. BTW I just joined the 100K club this week!
 

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The index mark is not based on the gap, it is based on the position the electrode takes once the pluge is torqued down. On each letter of plug, the threads are cut slightly differently to properly position the side electrode.
 

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Owner's manual

Yep, mighty glad those hyper overpriced plugs last 100k. Just changed my today also. And adjusted the valves. Runs so smmmooooth now. 8) I have to keep checking the tach to see if it's slipped into autostop when I'm not wanting it to.

I think you'll find the plug gap in your owners manual. The plugs come with paper tube protectors on them, so if the box is OK then the plug should be also. My old plugs came out looking much the same as the new ones,except for the dirt.

If you can't find the gap in the owner's manual, I have a service manual that I can look it up. Sorry, old geezer moment here, can't remember the gap. :roll:
Probably takes a special gizmo to adjust if they're off, though.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yeah two of the plugs came out of the box without the paper tube on the threaded part. They all looked the same, but one can never be sure.

I should probably adjust the valves now as well. Was adjusting the valves a tough job. Or is like any other Honda valve adjustment?
 

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commuter said:
Make sure you get the right stamped plugs prior to walking out of the dealer. The Honda parts guy said they were all "B" stamp and so I checked. One of the three was an "A" stamp. Very important to get the right ones.
This why dealerships piss me off so much, their service and parts guys don't know anything! The best thing to do is get your own service manuals and check the forums before you purchase parts or service.
 

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$60.90 for mine. You got a deal, or I got ripped off.
 

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Now's the time

Yeah, now is the time to do the valves, cause when you've got the plugs out (all 3 at once) you can easily turn the engine by hand using the accessorie belt pulley, where you need to, as you go thru the valve adjustment. HEY, but when you have all 3 plugs out, put some paper towel or clean rags or whatever into the plug holes. Just in case you drop a small bolt :!: Fishing it out from under a rocker arm would be bad enough. Out of a cylinder, Hooboy :oops:

A short, straight length of rubber hose, of a size that will go over the plug porcelain, will make getting them back in without cross threading a snap. Just poke the plug into the hose, then use the hose as a 'handle' for threading in the plug. When your plug is nicely screwed all the way in, just pull off the hose. Torque on the plugs is another crucial step also.

The valve part:
The intake side goes at .009" the exhaust at .010", stone cold engine. Nice to work on, all cool an comfy on the hands. Follow the torque specs on the adjuster lock nuts, don't wanna have 'em come loose. It was easy, just need a decent length 10mm box end ( the nuts are really snug on the adjuster screws) and a straight blade screwdriver and a feeler guage. It takes a very light touch on the screwdriver or you get the adjuster screw too tight, but just play with it until you have a firm (judgement call here) pull on the feeler guage, then duplicate that thru the rest of the valves. Double check the feeler guage after you torque the nut back. Unless you have a manual to tell you, look for the cam lobes to be opposite each other, and 'horizontal' for the cylinder valves you're doing at the first postiion mark on the camshaft sprocket. The intake lobe to the front of the car, the exhausts to the back. The order that you do them, (i.e. 2,3,1 cylinder) is not important, as long as they're all done. Mine started off with #2 available first, so I started there.


If I was working on these for a living, I'd have to get a super light torque wrench, cause some of these bolts, etc. are WAY lightly torqued compared to other cars.

After you're done, what a smooth idle you'll have. Nice! 8)
 
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