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Discussion Starter #1
i ran across some used watlow pad heaters at work today. they ohm out ok: 280 ohms each. they are rated at 50 watts each at 120 volts and measure 5" x 2". i have cleaned off the rtv from where they were stuck to some equipment. the plan is to rtv one of them to the bottom of the oil pan and cover it with some high density foam to stop excess heat from radiating down to the aero fairing. A one amp fuse in each lead by the wall outlet with a disconnect under the hood and an ac timer and i am good to go. pics to follow...
 

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think you'd be better off with a radiator block heater instead, lot less work and more productive, but good luck. :D
 

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this is not for use while under way. it is to pre-warm the oil and engine to avoid the lousy gas milage seen during the first few miles when the engine is still cold. i have a quick-drain for the oil pan, so i cant use a heater that goes there. i figured this was just as good.
 

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Ya, that's what a raidiator block heater is for, so that you can keep the coolent warm, so it doesn't take so long to warm to operating temps. Don't think an oil heater will be as efficent is all.
 

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oh, i already have the radiator block installed. and it helps the engine warm up and stay warm just fine. i am just trying to eliminate the warm-up entirely. nothing like starting up your car in the dead of winter to ruin your gas milage. :?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
the foam block has been milled out to accept the heater pad. now to scrounge up the wiring, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
wiring is done. the socket and fuse holder are mounted on the black plastic flow blocker above the passenger's side of the radiator. a one amp fuse is in place. i have set the heating pad under a large aluminum dutch oven (to simulate the oil pan) and put in about 3 quarts of water. after 3 hours the water and pan are sitting at 123 degrees. granted, its not 30 degrees and windy in my kitchen, and maybe i will need one or two more pads for this to work outside in the winter (its december 23rd, and 70 degrees right now), but its a start!
 

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Ha! I have you beat. I think it made it up to 80 here today.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
yeah, it only got to 71 this afternoon. oh well, it cant all be cold and snowy... what a darn shame... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
ok. finally some pics:



this shows the complete system, minus the AC cord that is run out to the grill. The object in the lower left is a new heater pad. it is 5" x 2". in the upper left is the used pad mounted in the foam block. the pad is flush with the top of the foam. the plastic flow-blocker has the power jack and the fuse holder mounted in it.




this shows the underside of the flow-blocker. nothing fancy, just soldered, shrink-wrapped joints.

hoping to install it in the morning.
 

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I am thinking about making an oil pan heating system which operates on DC alone. (I do not have access to a 110V outlet during the week, so that's why the 12V limitation.)

There are some low wattage ones on eBay such as http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Engi...42495QQrdZ1QQsspagenameZWDVW#ebayphotohosting Which is similar to this, but 1 1/2"x8" and is only 80W:

It draws about 6.67 amps.
I plan on utilizing a 12 V timer, so I can limit the operating time from 5AM to 6AM, which "should" warm the oil to reduce cold-start wear and help bring to operating temps much faster to help save fuel as well. I am concentrating on the oil heater instead of the block heater, because of the lack of 110 V power.

The plan would call for plugging the timer in the cigarette lighter.

What is not clear to me yet (many things, but let's start here) is:
What is an ideal target temp increase worth pursuing?
Could the 80W heater accomplish this?
How much time would it take to warm the couple of quarts of oil by about 30 or 40 degrees F? (I know environmental conditions affect this. But if we take wind out of the equation and assume 30'F ambient temp.)
Would this amount of time drain the battery too much?
Could this seriously decrease the 12V battery's life?


I would like to hear pro's and con's of this idea. Especially from the EE types. And feel free to speak in layman's terms not worrying about insulting my intelligence - I am an electrical retard.
Thanks!
-pete
 
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