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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've searched the forum but can't find the problem I'm experiencing. I don't know if these two things are related or not. The 12v battery is being overcharged. It's leaking all over the place and it's a HUGE mess. When I test it with a commercial tester, it tests 12.8 volts, which is normal for a 12v battery AFAIK. The indicator on the battery itself however, says it requires charging. Additionally, the driver's seatbelt is soaking wet. I cannot find water or dampness anywhere in the car. But since the belt runs down beneath where the voltage sensor is, I'm worried.

Everything else is functioning normally and the charge shows about 18 bars full on the original pack. It's an '06 CVT.

p.s. I'm an old user, but lost my username & password so I've just created a new account.

Edit: Disregard the wet seatbelt. I just read some posts on that!
 

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I have never heard of the Insight overcharging the 12V battery, quite the opposite actually.. it usually maintains it at ~12.1V, which is quite low.

Wonder if your DC-DC converter is stuck on somehow?
 

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Sounds ike someone overfilled the 12V with H2O. If it is a stock battery, not a replacement they were junk. If it has the "eye" on the battery they are not accurate, as it only reads one cell. If your battery is being charged at 14,2 V that is normal.
Need more information.
HTH
Willie
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Eli, can I reset the DC-DC converter by pulling a fuse or anything?

Willie, it's the original 12v battery with the eye, and as you know, can't be filled with water. Perhaps it's kaput? Maybe the other cells are dead and therefore can't hold the charge being put into it?
 

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What do you mean it can't be filled? If it's a regular flooded lead acid battery, it can have water added to it. It wouldn't be leaking electrolyte if it was a sealed lead acid.

But I take it you've never added water?

The DC-DC should turn off and on as loads are presented to the 12V system.. I'm not really sure what's going on here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What do you mean it can't be filled? If it's a regular flooded lead acid battery, it can have water added to it. It wouldn't be leaking electrolyte if it was a sealed lead acid.

But I take it you've never added water?

The DC-DC should turn off and on as loads are presented to the 12V system.. I'm not really sure what's going on here.
It says it's a maintenance-free battery right on it. There's no need to add water and it doesn't have the removable plastic caps on top to fill it. If there's a way to add water, I don't know how.

So, I take it the easiest/best solution is to replace the 12v battery and see what happens.
 

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It says it's a maintenance-free battery right on it. There's no need to add water and it doesn't have the removable plastic caps on top to fill it. If there's a way to add water, I don't know how.

So, I take it the easiest/best solution is to replace the 12v battery and see what happens.
Oh wow...

Yeah, if it's an SLA and leaking, it needs to be chucked. That shouldn't be happening.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Oh wow...

Yeah, if it's an SLA and leaking, it needs to be chucked. That shouldn't be happening.
Yeah. It's leaking from where the top is sealed to the body. But the battery isn't bulged. Anyway, I will replace it immediately. Thanks for your help.

Wille - not sure. It's the original battery which was in the car when we bought it new at the Honda Dealer.
 

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Years ago (1983?) I purchased a new Sears Incredicell battery. It was a super battery. When it was about 12 years old it needed more water but appeared to be a sealed unit. I was pissed that I could not add water and called the local Sears. I was told that those were not sealed and water could be added. I took it to Sears, the guy had never seen one like it (evidently they changed it after the first year). The top half was black and the bottom half was white. The black was really just a giant cover. When you pulled (pried, wedged, pried, bigger pry bar, etc) it off is was actually the water covers moulded into a giant top cover piece. I used the battery for another 5 years or more. I had it at least 20 years. Whenever I had a battery that was getting weak I would take it with and give myself a jump until I was able to get a new one for the specific vehicle. Boy did I get looks when I opened the passenger door, attached jumper cables to the engine, and gave myself a jump.

If the battery is the original one from the 2006 Insight, even if it is not the battery I would not see it as a waste of money to put a new battery in at this time.
 

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Yes, technically even SLA batteries have vents where you can add water, which is where his battery is leaking from. I didn't want to get into all of that for the purposes of this discussion though. Better to just replace it, especially if it's boiled over. ;) It's usually kinda a PITA to add water or electrolyte to an SLA, but it can be done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I agree, it seems like it's time to replace it, and it's just easier to replace it than fiddle with it to add water. And it helps that my sis works at a Honda dealer and I get a family discount. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Update:
I was unable to get a new battery in Canada. My family works at the dealership, and even they were unable to order it. The closest fit was the FIT battery (151R), but the posts are reversed and the cables don't reach.

I called around to industrial battery builders and they were unwilling to rebuild it for me. So I popped the top off myself and added distilled water to the one cell that was low. I then hooked it up to my new battery tender. It apparently has some sort of pulse technology and claims it can recover even a heavily sulphated battery.

I don't know what my issue was but since my dad's BMW is still running on the original 1997 battery, I figured there's got to be a way to make this one run longer. I let it charge about 4 days, and the battery stopped boiling over. I've been driving around on it ever since with no issues!
 

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That's nuts that nobody could find a battery. Even Walmart carries the correct size around here...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I know it seems ridiculous. It's because the CVT and the 5 speed use different batteries and the CVT was never sold in Canada. And for some reason, our dealer is not permitted to order from the U.S.
 

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Update:
I was unable to get a new battery in Canada. My family works at the dealership, and even they were unable to order it. The closest fit was the FIT battery (151R), but the posts are reversed and the cables don't reach.

I called around to industrial battery builders and they were unwilling to rebuild it for me. So I popped the top off myself and added distilled water to the one cell that was low. I then hooked it up to my new battery tender. It apparently has some sort of pulse technology and claims it can recover even a heavily sulphated battery.

I don't know what my issue was but since my dad's BMW is still running on the original 1997 battery, I figured there's got to be a way to make this one run longer. I let it charge about 4 days, and the battery stopped boiling over. I've been driving around on it ever since with no issues!
Could I have more information on this pulse battery charger please; i.e. make, model, links?

wiki is my friend

"Pulse
Some chargers use pulse technology in which a series of voltage or current pulses is fed to the battery. The DC pulses have a strictly controlled rise time, pulse width, pulse repetition rate (frequency) and amplitude. This technology is said to work with any size, voltage, capacity or chemistry of batteries, including automotive and valve-regulated batteries.[3] With pulse charging, high instantaneous voltages can be applied without overheating the battery. In a Lead–acid battery, this breaks down lead-sulfate crystals, thus greatly extending the battery service life.[4]
Several kinds of pulse charging are patented.[5][6][7] Others are open source hardware.[8]
Some chargers use pulses to check the current battery state when the charger is first connected, then use constant current charging during fast charging, then use pulse charging as a kind of trickle charging to maintain the charge.[9]
Some chargers use "negative pulse charging", also called "reflex charging" or "burp charging".[10] Such chargers use both positive and brief negative current pulses. There is no significant evidence, however, that negative pulse charging is more effective than ordinary pulse charging.[11][12]"
 
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