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Discussion Starter #1
Had a car come in the shop the other day with a P1565. Started with a visual inspection and found the suspect problem almost right away. The electrical connector for the commutation sensors at the electric motor is located below the 12v battery, toward the center of the car. The pig tail of the sensors only comes out of the electric motor about 4”. It then plugs into the engine harness. The connector/plug is the type that plugs together and then snaps on to a metal tang, the tang lock the plug together. To service this connection you must first slide the plug off the tang, you must lift the lock on the side and slide the plug off the tang to the side, then you can squeeze the lock tab that hold the plug together and pull/separate the plug half’s. Don’t force it and break the plug.

On this car when I inspected it, it appeared there was damage to the wire harness on a green wire on the engine harness side of the plug. (See photos below).

To access this easier the 12v battery and battery box were removed, not the crossbar.

What was found was in fact the green wire was mostly cut through. There were also rodent droppings found in the battery box with at least one acorn.

I was able to unpin the electrical terminal from the plug. I had a spare engine harness and was able to get the same wire with more length. I soldered the repair added some heat shrink and put it back together. Cleared the codes, started the car and no more P1565.

Just because you get a code doesn’t always mean it is the sensor. There is a reason they call it Trouble Shooting and not sensor replacing.

HTH,
Scott
 

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Good to know.

When I got my car it also had a lot of issues with rodents chewing...

Abs sensor wire rear driverside chewed
AC compressor clutch wiring chewed
Emissions canister hoses chewed
Windshield squirter hose chewed

Not sure if chewed or old age failure
Intake manifold vacuum hose
Coolant temp sensor wiring

Needless to say all of these issues were fixed for basically no cost.
 

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2001 5S "Turbo"
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For info:
If you live in an area where rodents are prone to chewing on the wires, Honda has a "RODENT TAPE" that works great.
I have used the tape on my motorhome a long time ago. On the LRR, if it is going to be setting over two days (Which is rare) I leave the hood slightly open and that works to keep the "critters" away.

HTH
Willie
 

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You may well have but the large connector in the harness behind the seats bulkhead is also a potential failure point.
Mine went here, damp, age, whatever affecting the commutation sensors and I bypassed it.
 

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I have the ima cover off, which one is it? Any pictures? Obvious damage to wire or internally broken?
You may well have but the large connector in the harness behind the seats bulkhead is also a potential failure point.
Mine went here, damp, age, whatever affecting the commutation sensors and I bypassed it.
 

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There is a thread on here somewhere, sorry no pictures handy.
It was an internal problem just bad connection.
I just hacked the harness and bypassed it.

But you need to determine where the fault lies.
Mine was obvious as when I went over hard bumps or waggled the connector the car faulted.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
A 1566 code on the car requires quite a bit of time with a volt meter working from the front of the car at the plug coming out of the electric motor for the comutation sensors to the the plug at the MCM. There are 9 wires at the front of the car and with the volt meter you need to check the wires from the front to the rear for resistance. You need to set the volt meter to Ohms and test the wires from end to end. This is not easy as the distance from end to end is great and making the connection and getting back to the other end and connected is a lot of climbing back and forth.
It’s highly recommended that if you work on this electrical problem that you have the,
Electrical Troubleshooting Guide. The guide has pictures and diagrams that are invaluable. The problem with this harness run are the numbers of connections and that the wires change colors at some of the different connections.
There is the plug at the front of the car at the electric motor where the sensors plug in. The next plug isin the passenger footwell area, it is light blue and right next to the tunnel. Then there is the plug that is on top of the tunnel between the seats. Lastly there is the plug that connects to the MCM and it has 11 wires in it.
To access all of the areas that need to checked you really need to pull the passenger side interior out and roll back the carpet.
When you have access to all the plugs, like Peter said, you may need to wiggle test all the wires near the connections. We have some of the proper electrical terminals to help make the connections in the plugs to be able to connect the volt meter at the ends when necessary. Also, with our male electrical test terminal, we use it like a feeler gauge and test all the female terminals to make sure they are snug. If they are not snug, we unpin the terminal and make sure it is snug and has some resistance, then put it back in the plug.

Peter has found a bad connection in the plug between the seats, not the sensors.

In our shop we found a car with the damaged wire listed above and loose connections in the passenger footwell, not the sensors.

I have a car of mine that I rinsed the engine to clean an oil mess and later in the day it through the code. Knowing I had washed the engine, I went to the plug at the sensors. Pulled it apart and found a couple of drops of water in the plug. Dried it out, put a tiny amount of dielectric grease on the terminals and the car has been fine, not the sensors.

We have one right now in the shop, we have tested all the connections and tightened up any terminals we found not snug. With the interior out of the car we test drive the car. This particular car coded again. We double checked the resistance front to rear, all tests good. Clear codes and drive more, code comes back in about 10 miles. We just had the transmission out and swapped the sensors. So far, about 50 miles of test drive and no code, maybe it is the sensors this time.

Scott
 
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Discussion Starter #11
Couldn’t tell you, never considered it. Pretty sure you would have to make a whole new sub harness and figure out where you would route it.
For me, I will continue to diagnose and repair the original equipment.

Scott
 

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I have seen a couple of sets of actual damaged sensors usually with the end damaged by debris interacting with the commutation disk in some unfathomable way.

However you really want to be 100% sure it is the actual sensors and not the wiring before pulling the transmission.

I did make a prototype sensor analyser years ago you plugged in directly to the connector on the motor but it's still simmering on the back burner with 50 other projects. :(
 

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I have seen a couple of sets of actual damaged sensors usually with the end damaged by debris interacting with the commutation disk in some unfathomable way.

However you really want to be 100% sure it is the actual sensors and not the wiring before pulling the transmission.

I did make a prototype sensor analyser years ago you plugged in directly to the connector on the motor but it's still simmering on the back burner with 50 other projects. :(
I’d be interested in buying that :)
 
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