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Discussion Starter #1
Hey,

Does anyone know how to disassemble the passenger mirror, someone (possibly me) broke the mirror, not the glass, but some internal part. So, the mirror is still in there, it is just really loose. If I could get it apart, I could fix it up with some crazy glue or epoxy. I've got it off and all the visible screws out of it, I'm just at a loss as to how to get the stupid glass mirror out :(

Thanks
Paul
 

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If it is easy, be sure to let us all know.

I have a similar problem, but it isn't so bad that I really need to fix it...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Okay, I figured it out..
  1. Remove Door Panel
    There are several screws:
    • In the door handle & lock assembly, there is a small black cover, pull it back and remove the screw.[/*:m:sk1urdpd]
    • In the jesus handle (whatever that black thing is called) there are two, remove the top and bottom black covers.[/*:m:sk1urdpd]
    • In the speaker cover, there are three.[/*:m:sk1urdpd]
    [/*:m:sk1urdpd]
  2. Remove the small black triangle, the area where a manual adjuster would be.[/*:m:sk1urdpd]
  3. Roll down the window, remove the door panel.[/*:m:sk1urdpd]
  4. Disconnect the mirror wires, there is only one connector, it is obvious.[/*:m:sk1urdpd]
  5. There are three bolts holding the mirror on, remove them all. There are actually 4 bolts, don't worry if you remove the fourth it doesn't break anything. It may be a good idea to hold the mirror assembly at this point, as it will fall, if you do not.[/*:m:sk1urdpd]
  6. Remove the mirror.[/*:m:sk1urdpd][/list:eek::sk1urdpd]

    Now, once you have the mirror off..
    1. There are three screws in the bottom, they are very stiff, so use a screwdriver that fits or you'll strip them.[/*:m:sk1urdpd]
    2. There is a little black panel, which can be pried off w/ a screwdriver, near where you just disconnected the base.[/*:m:sk1urdpd]
    3. Now the tricky part, how the heck do you get the actual mirror off?[/*:m:sk1urdpd]
    4. You pull the mirror, to one side, not too hard. [/*:m:sk1urdpd]
    5. Get a flashlight, there are three small snap rings (like key rings) holding the mirror to the motor assembly.[/*:m:sk1urdpd]
    6. I used a small file to push the snap rings down toward the motor assembly.[/*:m:sk1urdpd]
    7. After you get them all, pull the mirror, somewhat hard and it will come off.[/*:m:sk1urdpd]
    8. There are three screws holding the motor in place, you can remove them if you need.[/*:m:sk1urdpd]
    9. There are two wires to the assembly just disconnect them...[/*:m:sk1urdpd]
    This was as far as I got, as I didn't need to remove the whole motor, if you have to do that, you're in for a treat, it will be a big hassle, because you'll have to disconnect the wire assemblies and feed them through the motor assembly.
<Edit>
So I just finished putting the assembly back together, it took me one hour to get the mirror back onto the motor assembly. There are these little ball and socket arms, which go into the back of the mirror, to get it to reattach, you have to get a really long and small pair of pliers, reach in and push the mirror REALLY REALLY hard, while prying up, but you have to be careful not to pry up too hard or you'll rip the little arm off, then you'll probably have to pay honda $$ to get a new motor assembly.

The "Craftsman Companion 2 pc. Pliers Set" would probably work well, Sears Item Number: #00930429000
 

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I had the misfortune of having crunched the driver's side rear view mirror twice.
Remarkably, the housing and glass survived both times, but the mount was significantly damaged.
Another Insight owner was kind enough to send me a drawing of the 3-bolt mirror arm flange. The rest I had to figure out on my own.
Unfortunately, I didn't have the benefit of vbrtrmn's detailed procedure at that time.
My first repair was an awkward form of orthoscopic surgery, because at the time, I didn't realize that the mirror could be "snapped" out of the the socket mount. The plastic-compatible epoxy injection worked great until the next unfortunate event.
The second "surgical procedure" took more time and patience, with the added frustration of screws dropping into the door several times. Thanks to the magnet-on-string "fishing" procedure, all's well that ends well. My mirror's adjustment range is more limited now, but I haven't had to adjust it since the second repair. I've been very gentle scraping off ice and snow.
Caution, attempted mirror repairs may be rated R for language.
 

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Door Mirror Glass Ball Pivot Broken - Fix/Repair

Hey,
...... the mirror is still in there, it is just really loose. If I could get it apart, I could fix it up with some crazy glue or epoxy. I've got it off and all the visible screws out of it, I'm just at a loss as to how to get the stupid glass mirror out :(
I pulled the glass off the motor housing screwed inside the mirror cover and I found the loose part was due to the central pivot for the mirror being broken off.
It was gone so couldn't be fastened back. The mirror glass was just held on by the two small adjustment balls. It was annoying in that the mirror flashed in the sun or with headlights of cars following and wouldn't stay in position when underway.

To replace the ball pivot, after a look in the auto recycling yards without finding anything easily and not wishing to part with 100 dollars for a recycled one off the web, I kludged the reattachment.
Basically my fix was using a piece of rubber to sort of reverse the ball and socket arrangement. Click here to see the composite picture. I had considered screwing a small bolt into the mirror motor housing and filling the socket with rubber cement, but I still wanted full adjustability from flex in the rubber and wasn't sure how it would set up and what it would be like in winter.

An old coil wire plug boot [Bosch] slipped over the outside of the mirror pivot's socket to grip tight. I trimmed it to form some tabs or 'feet' with a pair of small curved scissors and an exacto blade.
I experimented with turning the cut ring and tabs inside out so the 'feet' gripped better once stuffed into the holes in front of the mirror motor. It was necessary to jam them in using a metal probe which made the fit all the more secure. "Cut-&-Fit" a few times to get the depth correct as seen in the picture.
Only three tabs can be had: one slot is occluded by the actual mirror motor attached to the black plastic assembly. The rubber was trimmed down in stages with the curved scissors and exacto blade via deepening the grooves cut as seen in the image. Keep a good flush edge on to grip the socket.
I drew a pattern with pen onto the boot beforehand which helped with the cutting of the compound curved rubber surface for better accuracy.

After the rubber was well seated [maybe I should have used a bit of silicone to help bind where the 'feet' went, but i didn't] ...re-attachement of the glass mirror back was a somewhat blind matter of centering the socket part of the mirror over the rubber hose already firmly in place on the mirror motor assembly, and then pushing and wiggling the mirror downwards at the center [wet it first, it works better to slide over the rim].
Basically, after a bit of effort and circular motion it pops in. seats down with pressure, and will be suspended on it's own, that is ...the outer part of the socket is grabbed by the rubber.

Then next is lining up the two small balls that move in and out with the motor and pressing the sockets home. I did top first then the one lower down as it's harder to see. Get them aligned first:
When you press on the balls they will ratchet to their lower position, exactly like adjusting the mirror without using the electric motor. To help find the proper spot and guide them down gently before pressing on, you may want to raise the balls electrically to the top to find the spot, then do the "pushing gently but firmly downward" part until they snap into the tiny sockets on the back of the mirror. I did this with some trepidation but nothing broke. I removed the steel rings of the sockets before attempting this for easier fit; and the balls haven't popped out of the sockets yet.
No more jiggly passenger mirror so it can be seen out of for safer lane changes and less irritation with no more 'strobe light effect' from following traffic at night.

You could likely use any flexible hose of the proper inside diameter to tightly grip the pivot ball socket at the back of the mirror, or even cobble in a ball from another recycled mirror; make one out of a large headed bolt; or ???? likely a few ways to do it but the old Bosch spark plug boot worked for me.
 

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In about a week or so I will be replacing the mirror glass on my passenger side mirror. I hope I do not have to remove the housing itself from the car to do it. This might be one of those times I have to take the new mirror to Honda and pay them to do it. Last thing I want to do is shatter the new mirror glass.
 

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Okay, I figured it out..
So I just finished putting the assembly back together, it took me one hour to get the mirror back onto the motor assembly. There are these little ball and socket arms, which go into the back of the mirror, to get it to reattach, you have to get a really long and small pair of pliers, reach in and push the mirror REALLY REALLY hard, while prying up, but you have to be careful not to pry up too hard or you'll rip the little arm off, then you'll probably have to pay honda $$ to get a new motor assembly.

The "Craftsman Companion 2 pc. Pliers Set" would probably work well, Sears Item Number: #00930429000
I replaced the glass yesterday. I too was having a bear of a time trying to get the glass reattached. I initially gave up but KLR3CYL responded to my post over on the "Honda Insight Forum 1st-Gen Discussion" thread about how to do it.

1) Greased up the sockets on the back of the new mirror with some automotive lithium grease to make installation smoother and to allow the pivots to not get worn down. I noted the original mirror had grease in the sockets.
2) Using the palm of my hand on the mirror, I pressed the mirror onto the center pivot assembly until it snapped into place.
3) As this was the passenger side mirror, I set the mirror adjustment to fully down and fully left. This caused the adjustment arms to be fully extended and makes alignment with the sockets on the back of mirror much easier.
4) Again with the palm of my hand on the mirror, I pressed against the upper side of the mirror until the upper arm snapped into place.
5) Using all five of my fingers spread across the right side of the mirror, I pressed on the mirror until the side arm snapped into place.

The mirror now works fine. It was also pleasant to see how clear the mirror is. The original mirror had hard water stains on the glass and I did not realize how much they "fogged" it over. I never had a visibility problem but this new mirror is spotless.
 
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