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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2000 Honda Insight with 170,000 miles on it and a five-speed manual, my wife's daily driver. Two days ago it began to develop a harsh scraping sound, like disc brakes make when a car starts rolling after it has been sitting in a rainy environment for a few weeks, when the car is in gear. The sound is more noticeable in gears 1-3, and stops almost instantly when the car is taken out of gear. It is not a motor noise; with the clutch fully depressed, the engine can be reved from idle to high in the RPM range and the noise never occurs, but happens instantly when the clutch is released, even in neutral.

I've gathered from reading on here and elsewhere that the probable culprit is the intermediate shaft bearing. I've done transmission-out and engine-out work on my other cars so I'm not in the least bit intimidated to get my hands dirty, especially because I live in a rural area where the options for qualified mechanics nearby are pretty scant.

I'd love some insight (lol) from the masters here though, specifically in three areas:

1. I know having the transmission off is a prime time for other repairs. Anything else I should do while it's down? I'm committed to having this car until its wheels fall off and love it to death, so preventative measures are great.

2. Are there any guides out there on how to pull the transmission, or specifically, the intermediate shaft bearing, or do I need to buy the FSM? I ask partly because FSMs are sometimes more difficult to follow than a color photo tutorial.

3. Is there anywhere specific that I should buy parts, or just go to the dealership?

Thank you!
 

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Input shaft bearing

At 230,000 some miles I am facing the same problem. Another posting somewhere on this web site gave an average of 250,000 miles without giving a standard deviation for the failure of this bearing on manual transmission insights.

I am giving you -- without expertise -- a posting that you can view that will give you an idea of only some of the parts you will need.

http://www.insightcentral.net/forum...st-gen-discussion/54481-part-number-list.html

Other postings on this forum may help. The service manual is still available at Helminc.com.

I may do some jobs on this vehicle, but this I will probably have done by the Honda dealer.
 

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1) Obviously when the transmission is out is the right time to replace the clutch. I'd resurface the flywheel as well, it seems to make a big difference in smoothness when launching. The manual says the flywheel can't be resurfaced, but it can by a competent machine shop that knows to preserve the "lip". While you're deep in the engine bay is a good time to take a look at all your suspension bits, see how your front struts are doing, ball joints and such. Brake maintenance is also fairly easy to do at that point.

Edit: You also remove the rear engine mount as part of the process, and the rear engine mount is commonly bad and causes a shaky engine and jerky low speed behavior. Now is a good time to replace if needed. With a new clutch and new rear engine mount you might discover a whole new driving experience.

2) You can download the Factory Service manual from a post on this forum.

http://www.insightcentral.net/forum...0-2006-insight-service-manual-pdf-others.html

Between that and the pictorial guide here you should be all set.

http://www.insightcentral.net/forum...-5-speed-input-shaft-bearing-replacement.html

3) I buy all my parts from Majestic Honda Majestic Honda - The Internet's #1 Honda Automotive Parts Store, they seem to stock most everything, have good prices, and ship quickly.

Edit: You can buy the clutch kit cheaper from other sources. Just type "Honda Insight Clutch Kit" into google shopping and you should get it for around $200.
 

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Pretty sure you have the infamous Input Shaft Bearing problem. While you have it apart, it is a great time to modify the synchronizer clocking tabs so that you prevent the also common 3-2 downshift grind.

My 0.02 worth,
Tim
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The notion that the clutch kit doesn't include a new flywheel is totally bizarre to me, but W/E, anybody got any good NJ/eastern PA machine shop recommendations?

I'll do the mounts and stuff. The car doesn't have a downshift grind unless my wife is hotrodding its little 3-cylinder motor, so I'm a bit nervous about pulling a synchro cone. Maybe I'll do some reading and see how daunting that is. It'll be nice to work on a transmission I can carry; the transaxle on my Corvette was half a block long and weighed like 300 pounds.

One thing I've got here is a lot of really top-notch audio and video equipment, so I think I might create a really comprehensive DIY video if I get through this without losing my mind.
 

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The notion that the clutch kit doesn't include a new flywheel is totally bizarre to me, but W/E, anybody got any good NJ/eastern PA machine shop recommendations?

I'll do the mounts and stuff. The car doesn't have a downshift grind unless my wife is hotrodding its little 3-cylinder motor, so I'm a bit nervous about pulling a synchro cone. Maybe I'll do some reading and see how daunting that is. It'll be nice to work on a transmission I can carry; the transaxle on my Corvette was half a block long and weighed like 300 pounds.

One thing I've got here is a lot of really top-notch audio and video equipment, so I think I might create a really comprehensive DIY video if I get through this without losing my mind.
doing the synchro is not very much additional work considering. I recall doing it without any real special tools (I did use an impact wrench to take the large nut off the the countershaft (taking note that it's left hand threaded). If you have a soft-jaw vice you probably don't need the impact. The manual makes it seem like you need fancy bearing separators but if you follow the various forum advice you'll note that you can disassemble the shaft once the nut is off by carefully dropping it onto a hard surface from about a foot up (holding onto it loosely to keep it all vertical). To put it back together, a collection of large sockets and a hammer will do the trick. Just make sure you put each piece back the way it came! The manual is actually pretty good at walking you through the assembly.
 

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The notion that the clutch kit doesn't include a new flywheel is totally bizarre to me, but W/E, anybody got any good NJ/eastern PA machine shop recommendations?

Did you mean pressure plate?
 
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